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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As good as their first album
Montrose set a high standard with their first album, but struggled to reach the same heights again on Paper Money. By the time they got to 'Warner Bros presents' Sammy Hagar had departed and Ronnie Montrose was back in control of his own band. This album was largely ignored but is still a classic. Covers of Twenty Flight Rock and Lucky Man demonstrated Montrose's gift...
Published on 9 July 2008 by CSB

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New line-up fails to impress
The departure of Sammy Hagar after "Paper Money" created 2 problems that this band never adequately overcame. Firstly his replacement Bob James, though possessing a good voice, was simply not in the same class as a singer and secondly he lacked Hagar's song-writing ability. Keyboards were now taking on a more prominent role and the sound of this album is barely...
Published on 18 Jun 2009 by Fergal Woods


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New line-up fails to impress, 18 Jun 2009
By 
Fergal Woods "Axe Victim" (Leitrim, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Warner Bros. Presents Montrose! (Audio CD)
The departure of Sammy Hagar after "Paper Money" created 2 problems that this band never adequately overcame. Firstly his replacement Bob James, though possessing a good voice, was simply not in the same class as a singer and secondly he lacked Hagar's song-writing ability. Keyboards were now taking on a more prominent role and the sound of this album is barely recognisable from their first two releases.

Production-wise the sound is recessed so that the stronger numbers like Black Train (great solo!) and Matriarch (both Purple-type rockers) lose some of their impact. Ronnie Montrose dispensed with the services of Ted Templeman and took on production responsibilities himself with mixed results. "Whaler" is a long plaintive song which is highly evocative of a winter seascape and "Lucky Man" is a very catchy cover.

However the real highlight is "All I Need" which has a lovely picked chord sequence as it's intro, a good melody followed by a heavier riff and tasteful solo. It's one of Ronnie's best compositions. "20 Flight Rock",the acoustic instrumental "One and a Half" and the dragging "Clown Woman" are fillers at best, and "Dancin' Feet" suffers from a poor mix, with guitar solos too low and a longish fade that cries out for another solo. For much of the album the sound is bottom-heavy and boomy.

Overall it's a patchy album which has it's moments but fails to reach the standard of its predecessors.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As good as their first album, 9 July 2008
This review is from: Warner Bros. Presents Montrose! (Audio CD)
Montrose set a high standard with their first album, but struggled to reach the same heights again on Paper Money. By the time they got to 'Warner Bros presents' Sammy Hagar had departed and Ronnie Montrose was back in control of his own band. This album was largely ignored but is still a classic. Covers of Twenty Flight Rock and Lucky Man demonstrated Montrose's gift for picking good cover versions and adding his own style - he would do this again with Gamma 5 years later. However, it's on his own songs that Montrose really opens up and shows what he was capable of. Tracks like Matriarch, Black Train and All I Need are as good as anything any rock band from the 70s produced - probably better. Montrose's style is often compared to Jeff Beck, and oddly he shares Beck's lack of commercial success. Both are guitarists who inspired others, but whose own work was largely forgotten except by a few diehard fans.

The reason it loses a star is that the production lets the album down a bit - always sounded to me like it was recorded in someone's garage. However, still well worth buying.
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