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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shock Waves Blue Underground's Region Free Blu ray review.
Ken Wiederhorn's classic 1977 zombie gem Shock Waves finally gets a much needed HD upgrade courtesy of Blue Underground, the company who gave fans the then definitive DVD version way back in 2002. The Blu ray is region free and playable on all Blu ray players worldwide so order with confidence. My copy came with the usual slim line case that is the norm for American...
Published 6 months ago by Mr. E. A. Williamson

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a "Video Nazi"
I must say i was expecting more from this film, which in effect, is a timid little outing with no bloodshed and no reason for it to be an 18 cert.
It's quite annoying in the way that the score often rises to a crescendo to lead you to believe that something horrific is going to happen then something banal happens.
Cushing is just OK in a poor role for him, and...
Published 18 months ago by JONESY


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shock Waves Blue Underground's Region Free Blu ray review., 21 Dec. 2014
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Ken Wiederhorn's classic 1977 zombie gem Shock Waves finally gets a much needed HD upgrade courtesy of Blue Underground, the company who gave fans the then definitive DVD version way back in 2002. The Blu ray is region free and playable on all Blu ray players worldwide so order with confidence. My copy came with the usual slim line case that is the norm for American imports but also came house in an embossed slipcase.

The set up is simple with a visibly traumatised girl (Brooke Adams) floating dazed and confused aided only by a small glass bottomed life dinghy somewhere in the middle of the ocean. She is promptly rescued by a fisherman and it is from this point that she narrates her story of a doomed pleasure voyage aboard the rickety Boneventure captained by the incredibly grumpy old sea dog Ben Morris(John Carradine) and his two man crew. After the ships compass is damaged due to a strange solar phenomenon (which is never fully explained) the Boneventure finds itself miles off course where it is nearly crushed by the hull of a huge rusted old warship that seemed to loom from nowhere out of the dark watery night. With the Boneventure taking on water and also the fact that the captain has mysteriously disappeared the first mate decides to take the passengers to a nearby island. Seemingly uninhabited, and sporting a huge and once grand deserted hotel the rag tag bunch of survivors believe they have a safe place to wait for a rescue. Unfortunately things go from bad to worse when the lost captain turns up dead and a strange island recluse (Peter Cushing) with a distinctive German accent arrives on the scene warning them of the untold dangers on the island concerning a platoon of specially manipulated and bloodthirsty Nazi zombie stormtroopers called The Death Corps, who had been contained in the rusting innards of the warship for decades but who are now free and lie in wait around the coast and waterways of the small tropical island.
The idea of Nazi zombies now seems abit of a cliche and is indeed nothing new with a resurgence of undead SS officers in such films as the Outpost series and The Bunker. The sub genre was also parodied in the incredibly gorey Norwegian black comedy Dead Snow and its sequel to the point of ridiculousness . Back in 1977 though the notion was still relatively fresh with nothing really quite like it unless you consider the 1966 helmed head transplantation flick The Frozen Dead. As was always the case European movie makers jumped on the idea churning such unforgettable titles as Jean Rollin's Zombie Lake (which also plagurised the underwater theme) and Jess Franco's Oasis Of The Zombies.
Shock Waves has always remained a firm favorite of mine ever since i saw it on a battered VHS tape from Vipco in the 90s, so for me to do any real critical analysis of this much loved picture is hard as I always look at this film through rose tinted glasses. That said Shock Waves is far from perfect and is definatly not to all tastes. Technical problems abound from bad continuity through to plot holes and the movie hardly looks polished. Also any newcomers to Shock Waves expecting a 70s zombie gorefest along the lines of The Living Dead At Manchester Morgue, Dawn Of The Dead or even the original 1968 Night Of The Living Dead will be surely disappointed with the lack of onscreen carnage as hardly a drop of blood is spilt throughout the whole picture so much so that it originally recieved a PG rating in the US and if re-submitted to the BBFC today would more than likely get away with a 12 certificate as the old Vipco release only carried an 18 rating due to the inclusion of trailers for other far more graphic movies. But to me non of this matters as Shock Waves remains as effective now as when I first saw it for a number of reasons. First and foremost Shock Waves is atmospheric to the core from the tropical island setting which as to be expected has drawn similarities with Lucio Fulci's Zombie Flesh Eaters through to the often grungy 16mm photography. Much like another 1970s cult horror favourite, Tobe Hooper's Texas Chiansaw Massacre, Wiederhorn manages to pull off quite a few shocks, moments of creepy imagery and raw power without resorting to over the top bloodletting often associated with the genre. Its these scenes, mostly involving the zombies rising from the water that are most effective giving the movie an eerie dreamlike quality. The cast too are mostly excellent with the two big marquee names in both Carradine and Cushing perfect in small cameo roles, adding a touch of class, experience and professionalism to such a low budget production despite being given relatively little to do. The remainder of the cast are good without being overly memorable with the exception of a pre Invasion Of The Body Snatchers Brooke Adams in her first credited starring role. A special note must also be made about the wonderful electronic soundtrack by Richard Einhorn which adds to experience immeasurable and dare I say it enhances the mood and atmosphere to help create what is a very unique movie.
For me Shock Waves is a minor classic with some wonderful moments, brimming with 70s horror atmosphere so thick you could spread it with a knife. As I mentioned before its not for everyone but if you like discovering forgotten cult horror then I can wholeheartedly recommend Shock Waves.

Picture:
Shock Waves has always looked a little rough around the edges which could have been attributed to the fact that the original elements had been lost many years before. Blue Underground's new Blu ray release states that it was created from the only known surviving elements but when compared to their old SD DVD release this is significant upgrade especially if your a fan who has seen the film many times. Presented in the correct aspect ratio of 1.85:1 and sporting an AVC encoded MPEG4 transfer this looks about as good as I expect Shock Waves ever will unless a pristine print is ever discovered. Obviously there is always going to be room for improvement but fine detail is far stronger than SD could produce and despite a few out of focus sections which would have been inherent in the original photograpy this is fairly pleasing. The HD transfer also handles the thick grainy image more accurately lending the visuals a natural filmic appearance and thanks to a decent bitrate there are no encode problems to report. Print damage is somewhat lessened compared to previous release. That doesent mean its completely clean and indeed there is the odd line and traces of spotting print damage but it is never overly distracting and doesent diminish the overall viewing experience. Contrast at times can be a little bright especially on the brighter outdoor scenes and the image can come across as a little pale with colours hardly ever popping but dark scenes show
greater depth and are more discernable than the old DVD despite some crush and obvious fading. It is also worth noting that more image is visible within the frame on nearly all four sides. There isn't a huge amount of difference but it is always a positive to get the most accurately framed version. Hardly an award winning restoration but taken on its own terms this is a worthy upgrade that should please fans although newcomers who demand pristine smooth presentations may find the grain structure a little overpowering.

Audio:
Blue Underground have remained faithful to the original sound design and presented Shock Waves in its original mono delivered here by a two channel DTS-HD Master mix. Obviously this comes across as a little limited slightly lacking in atmospherics and depth but then is how it would have originally sounded. Dialogue on this lossless track is almost always discernable if at times hollow and effects feature more punch than the DVD. The most notable upgrade from this lossless track must go to Richard Einhorn's soundtrack which does indeed sound far richer and as its possibly the most important attribute to Shock Waves' sound design make this new Blu ray a very worthy upgrade.

Extras:
If you already own Blue Underground's previous release then some of the extras will be familiar such as the audio commentary featuring input from director Ken Wiederhorn, make-up designer Alan Ormsby and B movie director Fred Olen Ray and the documentary 'From Flipper To Shock Waves concerning star Luke Halpin. But for its Blu ray premiere, Blue Underground have produced some brand new extras to really add value to an already worthy package. First up is an all new documentary entitled 'Nazi Zombies On A Budget' which features a 21 minute chat in full HD with producer and cinematographer Reuben Trane who talks about the production and how much it cost to bring in both Cushing and Carradine for five days work apiece. Another acquisition for this new release is a 13 minute interview again in HD with the music composer Richard Einhorn and last but not least is yet another interview recorded in HD with star Brooke Adams with the title 'Sole Survivor.

Shock Waves marks yet another worthy Blu ray upgrade from Blue Underground. The transfer is a significant improvement over standard definition and the new extras are the icing on the cake. Keep supporting Blue Underground's decision to re release their back catalogue in HD as there are still some very worthy titles languishing in SD DVD hell and this release comes highly recommended.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars BLOND AMBITION, 7 Nov. 2003
This review is from: Shock Waves [DVD] (DVD)
SHOCK WAVES has for years been a often referenced, reviewed and beloved little gem of a zombie film that could. But it was also hard to find on video for years, and most people had to make due with dupes or copies taken off late night television, but no more. SHOCK WAVES on DVD is finally here, and it is just about perfect. Presented in widescreen with a touched up print, and a host of extra's (a fun and informative commentary, a photo gallery that not only gives us some insight into the behind the scene work, but also clues us in on some of the footage missing from the film - plus a great selection of poster art and production notes), SHOCK WAVES is sure to please any fan of the zombie genre without question. My only complaint about the film is that, while it builds atmosphere, suspense and a general feeling of unease, it is up until the last third of the film a bit of a bore. It seems that the Nazi Zombies are everywhere and yet nowhere as well, and Peter Cushing, a true star, actually has nothing more than a cameo role here (spending most of his times either in shadows, long shots or on the run). But when the film finally cuts loose, it's a thrill ride up until the final frame that leaves you grappling to turn on the lights quickly and check under the bed, just to be sure. A powerful film that has actually inspired a "tribute" from Peter Benchley, the author of JAWS, in his novel WHITE SHARK, which is almost a novelization of this film. For fans, SHOCK WAVES is a must, no collection can be complete without it. For those new to the zomibe wasteland, SHOCK WAVES is a slow starter that once going won't stop until you're good and scared.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars .......................not just for hair., 31 May 2006
By 
M. Massey - See all my reviews
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The first, and best, of the Nazi Zombie movies, the others being: Zombie Lake (1981), The Chilling (1981) and Oasis of the Zombies (1983), SHOCK WAVES arrives courtesy of Blue Underground as a Region 0 disc.

When a group of American tourists get lost during a boating holiday, and run into Hammer favourite, the always watchable, Peter Cushing, sporting a facial scar and talking with a clipped German accent, you know you are in for quite a ride.

Unlike other walking dead movies, these zombies hunt in packs, not slow moving crowds, and kill only for the sake of killing. Mean. Granted, the majority of the cast deserve killing, anyway.

Throw in Forties horror star, John Carradine as the crusty sea captain, and you've got yourself one creepy little horror film.

Zombie fans used to Romero style gore may find this tame by comparison to the great zombie man's epics, but it is the unease you feel during, and after, that makes this worth a viewing.

The disc is presented in widescreen, remastered from the director's own print, and even though this is grainy, it does not detract too much. Nice set of extras; trailer, still gallery.

You'll never view the beach on holiday the same again......
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another rare horror from two class horror icons Cushing and Carradine - Region Free, 30 Mar. 2015
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Peter Cushing - John Carradine and Nazi Zombies - well if that hasn't sold you what about the fact that the oddness of the film adds to the eeriness of the film. The Zombies aren't to bad either. Well worth buying as its Region free!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Deffinatly worth watching, 30 April 2015
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This review is from: Shock Waves [DVD] [1977] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
Classic bit of old horror, Strange looking zombies, I probably wouldn't class as zombies but still a good watch when having some beers round a mates
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a "Video Nazi", 28 Dec. 2013
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I must say i was expecting more from this film, which in effect, is a timid little outing with no bloodshed and no reason for it to be an 18 cert.
It's quite annoying in the way that the score often rises to a crescendo to lead you to believe that something horrific is going to happen then something banal happens.
Cushing is just OK in a poor role for him, and the rest of the cast sleepwalk through it.
The heroines reaction to the death of one of the characters seems to be one of boredom which is really strange.
Although quite creepy in parts, the lack of scares and inventive kill sequences let this film down imo.
This is a film that could definitely have benefitted from the use of a few SS daggers and Schmeissers.
This film is crying out for a remake.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shlock Horror, 27 Jan. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Shock Waves [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Another classic from the vaults of Vipco distribution, "Shock Waves" is very similar to "SS Experiment Camp" in its use of Nazi imagery. The premise is this; a squad of genetically engineered super nazi soldiers are left in a submarine at the end of WWII. They come back to the surface some 30 years under water only to reak havoc on a yacht full of Americans. Pretty much run-of-the-mill gorey action in the style of TCSM. It is what it is.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 17 Jan. 2015
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perfect.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars shockwaves not for your hair, 29 Nov. 2014
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Not really a zombie film,alright the Nazis are the walking dead but not your bloodthirsty type and why do they kill Peter Cushing,is a bit silly but watchable as was hard to get hold of
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shock n roll., 23 May 2009
By 
Graham Walters (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Shock Waves [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Definetly one for the collector,good atmos and Peter Cushing is a far cry from his Baron Frankenstein days in it,simply bizaare,the nazi zombies look effective and menacing,grotesque at times,it probably won't appeal to the fulci/ romero zombie lovers enmasse but,definetly an icon to savour.
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