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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic banquet from 1968
After the 1967 pop-psychedelic `Satanic Majesties' project, the Stones returned to their rock/blues form in style with `Beggars Banquet' featuring some storming tracks which subsequently became all-time concert favourites. BB introduced the `main sequence' of classic Rolling Stones albums including `Let it Bleed', `Sticky Fingers' and the epic `Exile on Main Street'. BB...
Published 13 months ago by The Guardian

versus
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars new vinyl review-it sucks!
Firstly, this is a classic album. There is no doubt about that. So I was excited to see this vinyl version which was released along with the dsd remasterd cd version. I have a very good vinyl set up, so was thoroughly looking forward to being blown away by the audio quality.

Oh dear! The vinyl was thin sounding, lacking the bass punch of the previous cd...
Published on 5 Mar 2011 by Raving Russell


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic banquet from 1968, 18 Aug 2013
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Beggars Banquet (Audio CD)
After the 1967 pop-psychedelic `Satanic Majesties' project, the Stones returned to their rock/blues form in style with `Beggars Banquet' featuring some storming tracks which subsequently became all-time concert favourites. BB introduced the `main sequence' of classic Rolling Stones albums including `Let it Bleed', `Sticky Fingers' and the epic `Exile on Main Street'. BB was also the last time Brian Jones recorded with the band, though his contributions to the album are sporadic and generally unmemorable because for much of the time, he failed to show up at the studio.

The opener `Sympathy for the Devil' sets the tone with ironic and edgy lyrics sung from the Devil's point of view, backed by a simple samba rhythm played on congas and vocal `whoops' to give it a primitive, raw feel. The high standard never lets up, with `No Expectations' the sole track where Jones' contribution really shines as he plays some mean slide guitar.

There are no fillers on this collection but the defining track is `Street Fighting Man' which came to embody the spirit of student rebellion in 1968, and even now is often deployed as a soundtrack for film pieces about the political unrest of `summer 68'. In 40 years, there has probably not been a single live stones concert where SFM has not been performed. Other highlights are the R&B `Dear Doctor', the raunchy `Stray Cat Blues' with its overtly sexual lyrics, and the folk-themed `Factory Girl'.

On BB the Stones finally found their definitive style as composers and performed with a new maturity & confidence. It still sounds fresh even in the 21st century, and is perennially voted into the `top 100 greatest albums of all time.'

Due to a minor error in the original analogue tape mastering process BB was heard for over 30 years at a slightly slower speed than it was recorded, so the key of each song on all releases before 2002 is a semitone lower than performed by the band in the studio. This was finally put right in 2002 when the ABKCO release restored the recordings to their true key and tempo. Subsequent releases (like the 2010 one from Universal) are at the original tempo and 30 seconds shorter than earlier versions, so if you want to hear the music as the band intended in 1968, buy a recent version.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You don't have to be a Stones fan to appreciate this., 11 Sep 2005
This review is from: Beggar's Banquet (Audio CD)
Beggar's Banquet is a great album that I'm only recently beginning to appreciate, despite the fact that I first bought it in 2003. I'm no great fan of The Stones, as yet (always preferred the Kinks when it comes to 60's British rock) but I can certainly understand why their peak albums, such as Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and this, are so well respected, with Mick and Keith really creating a melting pot of different rock n' roll elements that are advanced upon wonderfully by the other members of the band.

The overall style of the album is loose rhythm and blues, with nods towards country, folk and bluegrass thrown in for good measure. There's also that legendary opening track, Sympathy For The Devil, a song that has been covered, sampled and trotted out onto the soundtracks of so many films (most notably, Interview With The Vampire) that it must be recognisable even to people who think they've never heard the Rolling Stones in their life. From that exotic and sexually charged opening epic, the album moves into the more obvious country-inflected rhythm and blues numbers (the standouts amongst them including No Expectations, Parachute Woman and the immense Street Fighting Man). Jigsaw Puzzle is a nice piece of epic blues-rock with a great overall performance from the band and Jagger on fine vocal form, whilst the later Prodigal Son (a song credited to Rev. Wilkins) is a disorienting piece of carnival blues-rock in the same vein as Dylan's Rainy Day Women No's 12 & 35 from a few years before.

Stray Cat Blues is a great piece of rock and roll in the traditional sense of the word; with those swaggering vocals leading a top-notch band performance in which every member of the group seemed to be playing at their absolute peak. It leads us nicely into my favourite song on the album; the more folk-influenced Factory Girl, which has some fantastic acoustic guitar playing and an interesting approach to percussion. It's probably my favourite Stones song (although I'm not going to pretend that I've heard single song they've ever recorded... it's just the one that most appeals to me), and is a great track to lead us into the closing song on the album, Salt of the Earth. This is another excellent song that draws on bluegrass and folk, with the guitar and piano merging perfectly... complimented by Jagger's vocal, which here, seems to possess an innocent naivety far removed from the possessed intensity of some of the preceding tracks. The use of backing vocals towards the end of the song establish a soulful feeling that would carry over into Let It Bleed, making Salt of the Earth not only a great way to end Beggar's Banquet but also, strangely enough, a great place to start Let It Bleed.

Beggar's Banquet is a great place to start for those interested in discovering the music of the Rolling Stones, with the general critical consensus arguing that Beggar's Banquet is not only one of the best albums ever released by the Stones, but quite easily, one of the key rock albums of the 1960's. And, it must be said, that with songs like Sympathy for the Devil, No Expectations, Street Fighting Man, Factory Girl and Salt of the Earth featured on it, it's hard for me to disagree.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars worth buying again!!!!, 3 Nov 2012
This review is from: Beggars Banquet (Audio CD)
This is a brilliant album and contains some of the absolute best Stones tracks, not all that well known. Having seen them talk about Brian's brilliant and probably last contribution in No Expectations in the new video Crossfire Hurricane, I got out my vinyl only, to my horror, to find a scratch on it. Aaaaargh. Just bought it on CD along with Let it Bleed, another absolute classic with brilliant tracks not all usually included in compilations. Both recommended. And Crossfire Hurricane when it comes out. Compensating myself for failing to get Stones ticket!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Hear!, 11 Nov 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Beggars Banquet (Audio CD)
I remember getting in trouble for comparing this album with later efforts from the Grateful Dead. Whether you agree or not, this is a must hear! "No Expectations" features some fine slide from Brian and some nice bass lines from Bill. Keith sings his 1st solo on the 1st verse of "Salt of the Earth" (a song which starts out slow and mellow and winds up fast and raucous) and features a cool guitar solo at the end of "Stray Cat Blues". Charlie's drumming is at his finest on "Street Fighting Man". Mick is at his most poetic on "Jigsaw Puzzle".
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5.0 out of 5 stars Back to Basics, 29 Dec 2008
This review is from: Beggars Banquet (Audio CD)
In a year when the big guns of the British music scene were releasing some of their finest works, The Rolling Stones in 1968 took a step back from the Psychedelia that the band had dipped their toe into with Their Satanic Majesties Request, and instead opted to return to the style of music they found more comfortable, the Blues.

In 1968, Beggars Banquet was released on the Decca record label. It marked a return to the essence of what Keith Richards and Mick Jagger are all about. With Beggars Banquet they returned to the sound that got them into music in the first place, demonstrating a passion and purpose to their writing, which I think to some extent, was missing from their 1967 release. It also marked the end of Brian Jones fully contributing to a Rolling Stones album.

Produced by Brooklyn born Jimmy Miller, producer for great Blues connoisseurs The Spencer Davis Group as well as later landmark Rolling Stones albums, the sound on Beggars Banquet is very primal in nature and could be straight from 1930's Chicago, with many of the songs featuring sliding acoustic elements like No Expectations and the unbelievably underrated Jigsaw Puzzle

There are some Rock and Roll numbers to be had on this record as well. Whilst John Lennon was promoting a more passive revolution in the troubling times of 1968, Mick Jagger was right in the thick of London's antiwar protests. The result of his feelings towards these troubling times was the song Street Fighting Man, arguably one of their finest moments as a band.

The opening track to the album also stands out as one of the bands finest moments. Sympathy for The Devil with its very Luciferesque lyrics and an upbeat voodoo feel must have been quite the song in 1968, as it still stands up as a belting epic song to this day.

The Rolling Stones tried outright Psychedelia in 1967, and for me personally, there were bands out there that were much better at writing that sort of material. But when it came to out and out British Blues with a twist, The Rolling Stones were champions and head and shoulders above the rest. In Beggars Banquet they let rip and produced an exceptional album, not just for 1968, but for anytime, the front cover aint that bad either.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An embarrassment of riches..., 17 Mar 2008
This review is from: Beggars Banquet (Audio CD)
The first time I ever heard "Sympathy For The Devil" I was 15 and it absolutely blew me away. It was all too much - the slyly witty lyrics, the strident bark of Jagger's delivery, the creepy ambience...and when the indecently distorted guitar solo kicked in it was the coolest thing I'd ever heard. It more than deserves its reputation as one of the Stones' finest hours, and repeated listening does nothing to dull the magic. And that's just the first track.

The rest of the album is stuffed with tremendous songs, from the beautifully wistful "No Expectations" to the yearning lyricism of "Jigsaw Puzzle" to the strutting classic "Street Fighting Man" to the seamy celebration of the joys of jailbait that is "Stray Cat Blues" (these were more innocent times), the Stones could do no wrong on this record. It's that rare thing, an album that sounds so damned amazing on a first listen that you know you've just found a new friend for life.

Along with "Sticky Fingers" and "Exile..." this is one of my all-time Stones favourites, and if you've never experienced its seedy pleasures then you're in for a treat. Enjoy!!
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An embarrassment of riches..., 1 Mar 2005
This review is from: Beggar's Banquet (Audio CD)
The first time I ever heard "Sympathy For The Devil" I was 15 and it absolutely blew me away. It was all too much - the slyly witty lyrics, the strident bark of Jagger's delivery, the creepy ambience...and when the indecently distorted guitar solo kicked in it was the coolest thing I'd ever heard. It more than deserves its reputation as one of the Stones' finest hours, and repeated listening does nothing to dull the magic. And that's just the first track.

The rest of the album is stuffed with tremendous songs, from the beautifully wistful "No Expectations" to the yearning lyricism of "Jigsaw Puzzle" to the strutting classic "Street Fighting Man" to the seamy celebration of the joys of jailbait that is "Stray Cat Blues" (these were more innocent times), the Stones could do no wrong on this record. It's that rare thing, an album that sounds so damned amazing on a first listen that you know you've just found a new friend for life.

Along with "Sticky Fingers" and "Exile..." this is one of my all-time Stones favourites, and if you've never experienced its seedy pleasures then you're in for a treat. Enjoy!!
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Introduction to The Stones most creative Period, 6 Sep 2003
By 
Mr. C. W. Smith "karyobin@hotmail.com" - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Beggar's Banquet (Audio CD)
With 'Sympathy for the Devil' re-released, remixed and heading back up the charts this recording may well be one of the first stops for a new generation of Stones fan and it's not a bad place to start at all.
BB was the last album to feature Brian Jones (if you belive the press his only contribution was the photo shoot for the cover) and the first to feature producer supream Jimmy Miller whose deft touch is felt all over these sumptious tracks (another legend is that Miller and Wyman saved some of the tapes from a fire at the recording studio).
SFTD has to be one of the best album openers ever and the Stones don't look back, every track is a little masterpiece of its own. SFTD, 'Street Fighting Man' and 'Stray Cat Blues' all ended up on the live set list of the 69 US tour and 'Parachute Woman' has to be one of the best Stones LP tracks ever.
If your new to the Stones this is a great LP if you've been a fan for years the re-mastered version allows you to hear very clearly the instrumentation, such as Traffic's Dave Mason on the shenai on 'Street Fighting Man'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beggars Banquet, 10 Nov 2012
This review is from: Beggars Banquet (Audio CD)
This 1968 album is a return to their raw, bluesy roots and contains classic songs, such as 'Sympathy For The Devil' and 'Street Fighting Man. This is the first in an incredible run of albums that cemented their reputation as arguably 'The greatest rock 'n' roll band in the world'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beggars Banquet, The Rolling Stones - A veritable feast of delights, 16 Nov 2009
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Beggar's Banquet (Audio CD)
Following the band's well publicised problems - jail for Jagger and Richards, the growing rift with Jones and the rather odd `Satanic Majesties Request' album, it all seemed over for the Stones. But they found a new musical vision as a hard rock outfit, and recorded an impressive run of albums, of which this is the first.

This is an album chock full of instant classics. From the catchy opener `Sympathy For The Devil', the seemingly autobiographical `Jigsaw Man', the raucous `Streetfighting Man' through to the album closer, the paean to the working man `Salt of The Earth', there is no filler to be found here.

Finally the Stone's back catalogue is being given the treatment it deserves in this series of re-mastered SACD hybrid discs. On a normal CD player the sound is excellent, with a great mix that brings out so much more detail than the old, murky, releases. On a SACD system these will just blow you away. You really feel like you're in the studio with the band. My only complaint is the lack of any kind of liner notes. Some recording details and an essay about the band at the time would have been nice, but hey - it's the music that's really important, and that is superb.

Highly recommended to all.
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