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36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bruce has risen
It's been said that people can do their best work when faced with adversity. Bruce Springsteen, back with the E street Band for the first time on a proper studio album since - lets face it - Born In The USA, has done just that. From the first listen this cd grabs you and never lets its grip slip. The band are at their tightest ever and the introduction of string sections...
Published on 30 July 2002 by alcunners

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's more good than bad for the most part.
What attracted me to this album was the fact that the E-street band were accompanying the Boss for the first time in a considerable while,so I believed my ears were in for a musical treat,however,upon listening to this album my first reaction was,"Where are the guys hiding!!!".
Only on a few tracks are they distinguishable,if at all.....Lofgren and Van Zandt's guitar...
Published 24 months ago by N. Fitzgerald


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bruce returns and about time too!, 30 July 2002
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
Seven years since his last studio album, seven years!
It was always going to be worth the wait, and was. Fifteen songs, some with a 11 September theme, some haunting ballads, some classic E Street Band rock. So varied - Mary's Place could have been on 'The River' - it reminds me of Sherry Darling and Out in the Street. Further on (up the road) harks back to The Long Goodbye off Human Touch (a much underated song) and the Rising is truely uplifting. Paradise is haunting, up there with some of his best songs, and The Fuse is a great rocker.
It's a very long album, two or three of the weaker songs being left off would have made it 5 starts, but then we'd moan for not having them!
Up the Boss!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Boss is back!, 28 July 2002
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
When the opening chords of the rising start you wonder if you have put the wrong cd in by mistake.It is a beautiful string arrangement.Then the guitars start and Bruce and the E street band roll back the years.We have missed them so.'Lonesome day' is a strange choice for a single but is a good opener.It gives way to 'Into the fire' which is familiar territory for
springsteen,Just think slide guitar,however just as your thinking its a filler song it goes into a prayer type chorus which is very moving.Since this album is heavily influenced by the 11th september it needs to be listened to in that context.'Into the fire' is about the men and women who lost their lives saving others at Ground Zero.'Waiting on a sunny day' is destined to become a concert classic.Open the windows turn up the stereo and enjoy its simple hook.Coming down from that is 'Nothing Man' which is one of my favourite songs on the album.It is very close in style to his recent solo work,beautiful melodic and haunting.'Counting on a miracle' lifts you from your reverie and is vintage e street think hungry heart or cadillac ranch from the river and your not far off.'Empty Sky' is another sep 11th song and is deeply moving but is also an allegory for loss generally.
'Worlds apart' is a big departure with indian/islamic religion fused with traditional rock music fittingly entitled worlds apart.You expect Springsteen to tackle difficult subjects as he has in the past(think aids,the gulf war,vietnam,drugs) and he does not let us down challenging the view that America always = good Islam =bad.After that 'let's be friends' is a welcome mood lightener and very poppy!'Further on up the road' takes us back into more familiar territory but is another political statement very like Souls of the Departed from Lucky town.'The fuse 'is a poor track but just when you think Springsteen has run out of ideas he changes up a gear 'Mary's place' is classic stuff and its good to see he has not lost his skill for a feel good rock song.'Your missing' is the second of my favourite stand out tracks.Very haunting and heartbreaking about loss and not being able to say goodbye.The title track is again a poor track with nothing outstanding about it.'Paradise' is very like his tom Joad work acoustic and soulful.A hushed studio and bruce on his guitar almost speaking.The final track is the one he performed at the America for heroes benefit.'My city in ruins 'is the perfect track to close the album.It is filled with hope in the face of adversity.At 15 tracks its probably 3 tracks to long.But when bruce finishes with the cry to 'rise up' you can forgive him the extra tracks and even the cheesey synth.Bruce is back ,older,wiser and aflame with hope and dreams.This is not his best album ever but it is great to see he still has it.I doubt this will him any new fans but old ones will revel in the new music from one of the worlds greatest living rock stars.Springsteen finds extra ordinary stories in the very ordinary lives of people and in doing so gives all of us a bit more hope in a world where it is in short supply.BUY NOW
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back at his best, 15 Dec 2002
By 
Chuck E (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
I'd put off buying this album due to the lukewarm response - there's nothing more disappointing than seeing a hero fading away but, for me, this is among the best things Bruce has ever done - in fact I'd go so far as to say, lyrically at least, it is the best!
To approach 9/11 without veering into sentimentality or patriotic posturing is a class act. To be able to articulate the conflicting emotions of the time and inhabit the feelings (or, in 'Nothing Man', the emptiness: "Darling give me your kiss/Only understand, I am the nothing man") wrought by those fateful moments is the achievement of a true poet.
Stand out tracks being the immensely affecting 'You're Missing' ("You're missing when I shut out the lights, you're missing when I close my eyes, you're missing when I see the sunrise"), 'Empty Sky' ("I want an eye for an eye, I woke up to an empty sky"), and the elegiac 'My City of Ruins' (written before 9/11 but hard not to relate to that day). Along with the ruminative there is the healing and celebratory ('Waitin' on a Sunny Day' a classic E.Street Band song in the mould of 'Hungry Heart', or 'Mary's Place'). 'World's Apart' tries to find a context, and a way forward - "Will the living let us in, before the dead blow us apart".
In an age when music is more than ever regarded as 'product' and bought to fill in empty space like wallpaper, albums with true meaning and relevance are hard to come by, but 'The Rising' is an exception to prove the rule.
The best album of the 21st century?
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very surprising album from the Boss, 29 July 2002
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
Every single one of Springsteen's albums sounds different. Could you really define the man and his music with "Born to Run" or "Nebraska"? He has, over the years, approached an incredibly diverse range of themes and styles, and this album is... really different.
While his earlier albums, notably "Born to Run" and "Darkness" tackled the theme of the problems faced by American society during those times, this album expands to cover the whole world, and updates the problems to those we face today.
It has a much more modern sound, as Bruce promised us, and features some absolutely amazing lyrics. The vocals are strong with more presence than the music, which is also very good, and fits together perfectly. While I felt that some of the music was not perfect for the lyrics, particularly with "further on up the road", Bruce had taked a lot of risks with it. It would be so easy for this album to be a failure, in which Bruce poorly tries to imitate the sound of this time in the hope of appealing to people other than those over the age of 30 (I'm 15, but have loved the guy since I heard his Greatest Hits!). Instead, he manages to catch the sound perfectly and fit his own style smoothly around it.
There are some very surprising steps Bruce takes. He sings the chorus of track 1 in a distinctly Alanis Morrisette style, with the music fading away before he sings the final line, and then rising (No pun intended) right back up again. In "Worlds Apart" he opens with some Middle Eastern (I think) music. I thought someone had replaced the CD with my "Dead Man Walking" soundtrack. He then turns it into a rock song, and back to the lull of the sitars again. And yet, he manages to pull it off superbly.
"Into the Fire", a September 11 inspired track, features some great, exotic-sounding acoustic guitar work, and "Paradise", one of the most haunting songs The Boss has come up with, moves along gently to some James Taylor-esque guitar picking and a weird, electric background noise similar to crashing waves. The title track is stunning, both lyrically and musically. Some great, clean guitar riffs flow along with the perfectly-paced vocals, and it's almost worth the price of the whole album.
On the whole, there was only one weak track: "Mary's Place". I don't know what other people thought of this song, but I felt the lyrics were poor, so poor they had to be obscured by some confusing music that couldn't seem to work out if it was jazz or rock.
On the whole, this is an excellent effort, retaining all the magic of previous albums while tackling a wider - and more current - range of issues.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new sound for bruce?, 2 Aug 2002
By 
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
On first listen, it sounds pretty good. Some decent tunes. Quite a nice sound to it. Original aswell, which was a surprise. Bruce has managed to put a contemporary edge to his music without it sounding like an old rocker trying to sound young.
2nd listen, and you find yourself singing along with some of the choruses. Hey, this is quite a catchy record. By the 3rd or 4th listen, it is a work of art. The second track "into the fire" about the world trade centre followed by "waiting for a sunny day" (the first decent happy song he has written since Sherry Darling) really works well.
My only complaint is that the E Street Band is too tight these days. They sound like one big unit rather than individual musicians.
So all you people out there who thought that Bruce wasn't so good at writing since he met Patti and became a happy chappie, give this record a chance, it really is very good.
Stewart.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Its a cliche but the Boss is Back...., 6 April 2003
By 
Dundalkman (Scotland, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
The Boss travels the American continent to produce a record with a multitude of styles. Very relaxed, assured album this. Lets walk the tracks.
(1) Lonesome Day - with it's irresistible climatic chorus & upbeat groove -supreme Springsteen flavoured big stadium punch. Damn good punch this. (2) Into the fire - semi mystic Nebraskan Indian laid-back acoustic chant - excellent. (3) Waitin' on a Sunny Day - Light hearted Caledonian jig - a whistle inducing wedding dance floor romp. Totally infectious. (4) Nothing man - pure Tunnel of Love - soft haunting 10th floor downtown apartment TV off 1am reflection.(5) Countin on a miracle - busy full-on sound, a little bland saved by a brilliant scaled chorus. (6) Empty sky - Beat-led, piano-thumper of a song - not absolutely memorable - shortest song on record - needs the bite of a chorus. (7) Worlds apart - very complex sound, evocative haunts of Aztec incantation fused to classic Springsteen rock, works surprisingly well(8) Let's be friends - smooth, boppy Motown sound. Very agreeable tune-making.
(9) Further on - Better than average road warrior number - you can taste the dust on this track. (10) The Fuse - Quite industrial sounding progressive rock - pushing a little into new territory here - lyrically wicked as well. More than a nod to a famous Irish band. (11) Mary's Place - Catchy "live-ish" concert blast - The whole song is just "waiting for the shout from the crowd". All the elements here of Born to Run era here - not ground breaking but definitely works. (12) You're missing - very pure mellow string-led swing - absolutely perfect for slow dancing your or someone else's partner. (13) The Rising - energetic, anthemic, very accessible first single. Pulsing bass line with clever vocal duopoly. Good without being brilliant. (14) Paradise - Rock poetry - Best vocals on album, How can a song seem to be shrouded in early morning Mississippi mist? Killer last line -" I break above the waves, I feel the sun upon my face". Stunning. (15) My City of Ruins - Passionate Country - western blended with church organ gospel. Worthy response to 911.
Best and most consistent album, Springsteen has produced in very long time. No bad apples, just a couple that taste "funny". Welcome back to A street, E street Band! Needs shelf space in your life. 8.5/10.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 30 Oct 2002
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
Almost every track is a gem. I recommend you reserve judgement until you have listened to it a few times though because the first time I heard it I did not find it particularly exciting.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Understated Return For The E- Street Band, 27 July 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
The much anticipated return of the E-Street Band defiantly overshadows this CD. If you're expecting soaring sax solos, Roy Bittan piano and Steve Van Zant harmonies you'll be disapointed, as it has more in common with 'Human Touch/Lucky Town' than Born To Run. The only radical departure is 'Worlds Apart' which sees Bruce working with Africian musicians. Otherwise it's a solid collection of Bruce tunes.
For the first time recording outside New York/LA, Brendan O'Brian's production is not really a radical departure with a bit more strings having the Nashville String Machine on board, and there is not a rough and ready sound that some people have expected due to the quick (for Bruce!) recording and release.
Bruce has said that September 11 coloured his writing for this CD but lyrically there are no big political or social comments, with only 'My City Of Ruins' which was featured after the event, but written in fact before it for Asbury Park, New Jersey.
This is a contininuation of his work, not a radical departure that the location/ producer suggested or a step back that the E-Street Band returning made some hope for. You will have to live with it for a few months, but I'm sure that if you don't take the enormous expectations, and look at in the context of 2002 this is better than most offerings out there.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hey E Street!! Good to have ya back again!, 28 July 2002
By 
K. PETERS "tentacle67" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
As a Springsteen fan for many years, needless to say I was in a state of major anticipation for this and I was lucky enough to get hold of a copy (get the deluxe edition-comes in a little hard-backed book with lots of pictures and lyrics)a couple of days early and have been listening to it non-stop.
Anyone expecting to hear Born in the USA part 2 will be disappointed but hey it's been 18 years since that was released, the last "full" studio album with the E Street Band.
The first thing that hits you early on right from opener "Lonesome Day" and on several other tracks is a prevailing use of strings in the arrangments which I found initially off-putting but after repeated listenings add a nice texture to great songs underneath. "Into the Fire" resembles the gospel chorus from last tour's Land of Hope and Dreams"and has a country-ish feel to it over all. "Waiting on a Sunny Day" Starts off with a John Mellancamp-esque circa Lonesome Jubilee violin and sounds a bit of light hearted pop with a big sax solo from Clarence and wouldn't sound out of place on "The River". "Nothing man" glides in on that building keyboard sound a la "Streets of Philly" Bruce has been fond of using since "Tunnel of Love" and has great lyrics, the albums first real sombre, reflective piece. Next up, "Countin' on a Miracle" harks back to a "Human Touch/Lucky Town era sound and, again, the string arrangments add a nice almost Beatle-esque touch to the middle section."Empty Sky" is a U2-ish "Sweetest Thing" style number with a Neil Young sounding harp solo and leads into the albums truly phenomenal track "World's Apart" which combines a rousing Chorus-y Bruce style rocker with a middle eastern group of musos adding a real distinctive slant. You've really gotta hear it, only Bruce would attempt something like this post 9/11 and it really works after a couple of listens."Lets be Friends" took awhile to get my head around but would probably make a good single. "Further on up the Road" is more familiar territory and a rousing rocker fans will recognize as having been played towards the end of the '99 tour, one of only 2 pre Sept.11th songs on the album, the other being "My City of Ruins" which sounds strangely prophetic in light of that but was actually written about Asbury Park."Fuse", another slow starter but big builder is great as well. "Mary's Place" wouldn't sound out of place on "The Wild, The Innocent..." or "The River" and "You're Missing" is the most obvious reference to 9/11 with its theme of a partner coming to grips with the loss of a loved one.My next favorite song on the album is the title track which is pretty immediate and serves up another real catchy chorus, has a blistering lead guitar solo from Bruce and will go down a storm live! "Paradise" and "My City.." finish things off on a more sombre note on what is really a pretty upbeat and positive album.
This record is not as immediate as previous endeavors but the rewards are definately there to be reaped through repeated listenings.Alot of the songs that may at first sound abit over embellished in comparison to the stripped down machine of previous E Street albums will soon begin to sound like old friends and will really crank when they become road worn. They will take their place with the impressive list of classics in the
Sprigsteen cannon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sounds great!, 2 Aug 2002
By 
Peter Mee (Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Rising (Audio CD)
Just listening first time through now....
It's great to have the boys back etc. but the one big thing about this album is the production. The sound has a "gloss" which I've never heard on a Bruce recording before but which add so much to the overall ambiance and ties the tracks together (in a manner similar to the echo/reverb sound across "The River").
Destined to become a favourite and brings Bruce into the 21st century.
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The Rising
The Rising by Bruce Springsteen (Audio CD - 2004)
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