Customer Reviews


23 Reviews
5 star:
 (12)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better with age
I remember seeing this in a cinema during a wet holiday in Wales when it was on general release. My mother cried her eyes out at the end and my brother and I weren't far behind. Words like beautiful, poignant and sensitive get used a lot in movie reviews but they all apply to this, by far the best treatment of the Robin Hood legend ever on film. Because Lester shows us...
Published on 29 May 2008 by D. Herbert

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A blast from the past
I am a fan of Connery & Hepburn & fondly remembered this film! But times have changed & it now looks rather dated & not so adventurous. I suppose special effects have become so good that I have good used to faster paced films. But it's a gentle watchable film.
Published 13 months ago by Village life


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better with age, 29 May 2008
By 
D. Herbert (Meriden, West Mids United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
I remember seeing this in a cinema during a wet holiday in Wales when it was on general release. My mother cried her eyes out at the end and my brother and I weren't far behind. Words like beautiful, poignant and sensitive get used a lot in movie reviews but they all apply to this, by far the best treatment of the Robin Hood legend ever on film. Because Lester shows us a plausible Robin, as he might actually have been, but allows for some decent, if arthritic, heroics too - it's not a 'debunking' sort of movie. Someone else here has described the story as 'silly', which is banal and misses the point that whilst there's plenty of action this is not an action movie requiring a complex plot and a villain who dies three times. It's a character study about ageing, change and the ways in which the protagonists choose to deal with it. Suffice to say that an ageing Robin returns to England a lordless man and attempts to make the world the way it was when he was younger and happier, a bit like an old rock band doing a revival tour. The Sheriff, sadly for both of them, is still around and the relationship between the two is one of the best adversary-dynamics I've ever seen on film.
Hard to say more specifically without spoiling it too much. But I think the movie is really about what Dylan Thomas meant when he wrote 'rage, rage against the dying of the light'. Only someone very young and lacking in empathy would not 'get' this film, - so get this film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great unpretencious film - Deserves a wider audience, 30 Dec 2005
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
Offers a very believable but alternative view of how Robin ends his days with Marian at Kirklee Abbey.
The scenes are some of the most realistically portrayed I've ever seen: Robin and Little John get puffed out on scaling Nottingham castle's walls, waking up in a cold forest first thing in the morning is a shock to the system for all and the final battle is a one-on-one struggle to make you flinch. I for one have never seen such easy-to-identify-with real life touchs in a film, before or since. They made me smile.The extras dot the entrance and exits of scenes with clever touchs of Pythonesque humour too.
Add to this the underlying love story with the action and you have a highly enjoyable film, sometimes profound, mostly light-hearted but always gripping for the both the men and the ladies.
Connery, Hepburn, Shaw and Harris interpret their characters with great skill and perform superbly.
Highly entertaining, highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Little Film, 6 Nov 2007
By 
D Skilton (east sussex uk) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
This is really a great little film. It offers a totally different take on the Robin Hood story. Robin and Little John return to England older and wiser after 20 years with the Crusades. They find Nottingham still in the grip of the Sheriff. So they team up with their old comrades and do battle. Robin also rekindles his relationship with Marian who is now a Nun. This film has an inspired cast and a wonderful script. Also a good music score by the always reliable John Barry. Sean Connery has never been better as Robin and Audrey Hepburn is her usual lovely self as Marian. Also special mention to Robert Shaw as the Sheriff, Nicol Williamson as Little John and Richard Harris in a cameo as a mad Richard The Lionheart.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The day is ours, Robin,' you used to say, and then it was tomorrow. But where did the day go?", 18 Jun 2009
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
Of the three adventure films that Sean Connery made in the mid-70s, Robin and Marion is the one that people tend to overlook or even passionately hate. Certainly it's a film whose melancholy tone isn't for everyone - which is possibly why it took so long to get made (it was while researching this that James Goldman stumbled across the antics at Chinon that inspired The Lion in Winter). Returning disillusioned from the Crusades, its Robin is very much a man past his prime struggling to live up to the legend that's grown up around him in his absence and finding it an impossible task. It's at times achingly sad and was probably hobbled by expectations - Audrey Hepburn's comeback, sold as a romantic adventure and a love story (they changed the original title from The Death of Robin Hood to make it sound more romantic), Connery crossing swords - literally this time - with Robert Shaw again for the first time since From Russia With Love, from the director of the Three Musketeers movies and what you get is a film about legends past their prime destroying themselves trying and failing to live up to the impossible legends that have grown up around them. Talk about setting up the wrong expectations... Small wonder that, unlike The Wind and the Lion and The Man Who Would Be King, it barely recouped its budget worldwide.

It's certainly one of Connery's very best performances. A simple man, past his prime (it's one of his earliest non-toupee roles) and gradually realising that he has outlived his moment and has to face up to his oncoming death, the film carries a real emotional charge as he, Marion and his ageing followers try to snatch a few last moments of love and glory. Yet it's also often surprisingly funny without ever degenerating into the broad slapstick Lester's other period pieces are prone too: everything flows naturally from the characters' humanity and mortality. Probably the last Richard Lester film that's especially well directed before he went into a horrendous decline, it also boasts a strong supporting cast - Nicol Williamson, Richard Harris, Ian Holm, Denholm Elliott, Ronnie Barker and Esmond Knight among them - and a beautiful, yearning score from John Barry (a last-minute replacement for a rejected score by Michel Legrand that has only now been released on CD). If only, as Connery often said, they the original title instead of selling it as a romantic adventure it might be better remembered today - it's a film that's well worth remembering.

Columbia's DVD is extras-lite - just a trailer for the film and The 7th Voyage of Sinbad - but offers a good widescreen transfer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Robin and Marian - Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn in the most moving version of the legend of Sherwood., 2 Sep 2010
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
I was very very surprised when I first saw this film. Starring Sean Connery as Robin Hood, both of them legends of heroic fantasy, I was expecting a thrilling rollercoaster of a ride, full of big action and adventure. Very unexpectedly, it turned out to be one of the most touching and moving films I have ever seen. I absolutely loved it.

Richard Lester and Connery present us with a Robin Hood who is growing old and feeling his years. Coming back from the Crusades after the death of King Richard (a superb cameo from Richard Harris), he finds England under the heavy hand of John, and he sets out again to e the hero, saving the day and the girl. But it's not as easy as it was 20 years before!

At the heart of the film is the reignited love between Robin and Marian, now the local abbess. There is a real chemistry between Connery and Hepburn, and their time on screen together is most touching.

Robert Shaw puts in an excellent performance as the Sherriff, a more human character rather than the usual evil cipher. And Nicol Williamson is a superb Little John, who cares for Robin almost as much as Marian. Look out also for Ronnie Barker, Peter Butterworth, Bill Maynard and Ian Holm in memorable cameos.

Richard Lester brings all his usual touches to the direction of the film. The era is brought to life with a gritty realism, and the various fights are very realistic. No Hollywood choregraphed fights that look like ballet, it's dirty, bloody, exhausting, and the actors looks as though they really want to hurt each other. It's great stuff.

The ending, which I will not spoil for those who have never seen it, is almost Shakespearean, and is so moving I am almost brought to tears every time I see it.

This is a decent presentation. Widescreen, with a nicely cleaned up picture that looks really good, and shows every line on Robin and Marian's faces. There are no extras, apart from a trailer for the `seventh voyage of Sinbad', which is a bit of a shame.

An excellent DVD, I cannot recommend it enough.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much under rated classic., 11 May 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
ROBIN AND MARION DVD 2002

Richard Lester's ROBIN AND MARION is one of those much under rated films which slipped by almost unnoticed at during it's general release and seemed to fade into obscurity not being released on PAL DVD until 2002.

The story picks up where most Robin Hood films have left off, 20 years after the days of the Merry Band of outlaws and their adventures in Sherwood and opens with an older Robin, Sean Connery, returning to England after Richard the Lionhearts death following years on crusade and campaigning with the king played as a cameo role by Richard Harris.

The aging Robin, now an unemployed soldier finds that everything is not as he remembered it; the band of outlaws has faded away, Marion, played beautifully by Audrey Hepburn has retired to Kirklees Abbey and the ordinary people are still as troubled as they were before he left, and the Sheriff of Nottingham, Robert Shaw wants him gone from his shire seeing him as a troublemaker. That is just what Robin becomes, pride and disappointment cause him to once again rebel raising a small band of equally aged followers and launching an attack against the castle at Nottingham.

The story is handled in a sensitive and sometimes emotional style unlike Lester's treatment of the Three Musketeer trilogy. A most enjoyable film and one that every lover of the genre should own as it portrays a very realistic '20 years after' story of what happens to heroes when they start to get old.

Watch out for the cameo appearances of Ronnie Barker and the first class supporting role of Nicol Williamson.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful movie, an old tale with a new twist, 12 Oct 2009
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
Saw this years ago when it came out & just loved it, in fact I saw it several times at the theater in 1 week!

It's a terrific movie with some great humor, typical of it's director.

Wonderful performances throughout.

Nice wide screen copy, the extras are nothing special, but I only buy movies for the film, the extras don't bother me 1 way of the other.

Sit back & enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gem, 27 May 2009
By 
Barbara (Croydon, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
This film focus on several relationships: Robin and Marian, Robin and Little John, Robin and the Sheriff of Nottingham - but also a relationship barely there and often overlooked, that of Marian and John, who adores her. Each relationship is different, yet oddly tender: at one point the ageing Robin even helps the equally ageing Sheriff stand up, enemies though they are. And each is acted by a master of the art: Connery, Robert Shaw, Nicol Williamson and the incomparable, incandescent Audrey Hepburn.

Don't bother with this film if you want to see battles, but if you want to see the legend ending in a deeply sad, yet oddly satisfying and human, way then this is well worth watching.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sean and Audrey, 14 Jun 2013
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
Returning from the Crusades, having fought for the increasingly despotic, mysanthropic Richard the Lionheart (Richard Harris in fine form) and witnessing his death, Robin Hood and Little John (an uncharacteristically relaxed Nicol Williamson as his very Scottish sidekick) gladly ride back to the forest, in which they can perhaps lose themselves and grow old in the greenwood.
Not a bit of it.
For one thing, The Sherriff of Nottingham (a rather genial, if deadly, Robert Shaw at his sly best) is still lording it over the region, and stolidly humourless Sir Ranulf (a rare sighting of Kenneth Haigh) is itching to get his hands on the infamous robber, Robin. For another, Marian has - oh horror - become a nun in Robin`s absence, and needs rescuing from both her calling and the Sherriff.
Meeting up with Will Scarlett (a slightly wasted, but welcome, Denholm Elliott) and Friar Tuck (Ronnie Barker, of all people, underplaying nicely) Robin and John abduct Marian and set up camp in the woods.
But Robin is restless, even as he and Marian rekindle their old romance, and the remnants of the Merry Men - older and creakier now - reform. The Sherriff has a score to settle, Sir Ranulf is champing at the bit, and newly crowned King John (Ian Holm, suitably petulant and irascible) is only too happy to have Robin out of the picture.
Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn are perfect in the title roles of this autumnal, elegiac film from a mellowed Richard Lester. Their scenes together are at times unbearably moving, both still only in their late forties when the film was made, but playing a little older. Both look wonderful, Connery coming into his stocky, full-bearded maturity, and Hepburn never lovelier or more poignant. You can believe they once rolled in the hay as a young, carefree couple. Sean has occasion to do his "Who, me?" innocent bit as the ageing Robin, and Audrey is both feisty and vulnerable as the still fresh-as-a-dewdrop Marian.
The woods look gorgeous, the mock-up of the then small town of Nottingham is credibly medieval, and the whole thing has an air of authenticity about it. My one carp is that we are longing to spend just a little more time in the company of the merry band in their forest, which might make the last, tragic scenes even sadder and more to be regretted.
The final scene is beautifully done, the tear that falls from Marian`s/Audrey`s eye reflected by the tear that invariably falls from mine each time I watch this unusual, underrated and mostly wonderful film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Worth seeing, 10 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] (DVD)
We've had many films featuring the legend of Robin Hood, including the Russell Crowe effort presenting the supposed events leading up to Robin Hood becoming an outlaw. Here we have the ageing Robin and Marian returning to the greenwood in later life, after the crusades. It culminates with the famous and mythical shooting of an arrow to mark Robin's final resting place. A gentle film, beautifully shot and starring a host of well known actors. Worth seeing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002]
Robin and Marian [DVD] [1976] [2002] by Richard Lester (DVD - 2002)
4.76
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews