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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yoshimi Triumphant In Battle For Musical Perfection!
After The Flaming Lips' exhilarating and resoundingly seminal 1999 release, 'The Soft Bulletin', I doubted whether they would ever reach such heady heights again. However, this album vanquished all those lingering doubts into oblivion!

Contrary to the misguided assertions offered by certain critics, this isn't simply a rehash of the highly successful 'Soft...
Published on 19 Feb 2007 by Chris G.

versus
10 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 3 stars
I'd say that this album is only for the real fans of The Flaming Lips. This was the first album of their's that I've bought and I thought it was really quirky and fun. My favourite songs on it are mostly on the first half of the album.
Then I bought the album 'The Soft Bulletin' and found out it was waaaaaaaaay better then YBTPRs!
So if you're new to The Flaming...
Published on 1 Mar 2005 by Aida Attwell


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yoshimi Triumphant In Battle For Musical Perfection!, 19 Feb 2007
By 
Chris G. (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
After The Flaming Lips' exhilarating and resoundingly seminal 1999 release, 'The Soft Bulletin', I doubted whether they would ever reach such heady heights again. However, this album vanquished all those lingering doubts into oblivion!

Contrary to the misguided assertions offered by certain critics, this isn't simply a rehash of the highly successful 'Soft Bulletin' formula. Here, The Lips experiment more intently with synthesisers and drum machines. These help foster a staggering electronic soundscape, which evokes a mesmerising futuristic resonance. The music is as heartfelt and affecting as ever, with subjects such as loss, death and helplessness explored, but delightfully injected with the Lips' typical idiosyncrasies. The whole pink robots concept is utterly barmy, and a perfect example of the band's endearing ability to imbue ostensibly solemn subject matters with optimism and jocularity - whilst augmenting the music, not detracting from it.

To be honest, I could spend literally days waxing lyrical over the merits of each song on the album, but I'm sure my self-gratifying grandiloquence will probably send most readers into a coma, so, instead, I shall tender an uncomplicated précis: 'Yoshimi' is a work of genius. Please buy it immediately for a considerable dose of life-enhancement.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have., 22 May 2004
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
In the tradition of popular music, concept albums are generally poor and unsatisfying. Dire, even, with the exception of that rare few - Van Morrisons seminal 'Astral Weeks', David Bowies loosely connected glam rock fest 'Ziggy star dust' and Mike Skinner's 'A grand don't come for free' are a few gems in a mine of mud and rubbish. It was with a certain degree of trepidation then that I approached a concept album about a girl battling an army of pink robots from a band who I'd never heard a lot about before, and despite critical acclaim, upon first listen I was dissappointed.
The second listen was the same. And the third. But gradually the psychedelic, digital, orchestral indie-rock on display began to seep into my psyche and dig away at me, until the album had me hooked and stayed on constant rotation in my cd player for a number of weeks. Now I know that psychedelic, digital and orchestral indie-rock all sound contradictory, and they are. But 'Yoshimi battles...' blends the various styles and influences seamlessly into what initially may appear random and scattered arrangement, but will progressively unravel until it all makes perfect sense, much in the fashion of Captain Beefheart's classic 'Trout mask replica'.
The album opens to a harsh electronic voice reverberating before breaking into a summery introspective tune which initially sounds reminiscent of 'Father and son' before finding it's own shape. One more robot / sympathy 3000-21 is blessed with Coyne's soft centred vocals which bring a ludicrous concept to have some emotional effect as he sings 'one more robot wants to be something more than a machine' to a pacy drum snare and electronic sounds. The two namesake songs of the album spiral towards a frantic and chaotic electronic climax yet somehow retain a sense of melody amidst the confusion of Yoshimi's screams and laser shots. Later the listener is sonneted by the innocent charm of 'Do you realize' as Coyne softly sings plaintive but touching lyrics to a low tempo track.
Such a medley of styles and influences would normally provide a stumbling block for any artist or band, but apparently not with The Flaming Lips. Traces of artists ranging from Captain Beefheart to Kraftwerk to Blur are detectable within this album, yet for all their contrast they blend perfectly. Though the subject matter is ludicrous, the psychadelia of the record and the heartfelt vocals of Coyne combine to submerge the listener in the story and the music. Small touches such as a chorus of girls making karate chop noises in the back ground to the lyrics of 'Her name is Yoshimi, she's a black belt in karate' are a measure of the intracicy of the album, it's quirkiness, and it's charm. The production from the band, Dave Fridmann and Scott Booker is pin-point accurate throughout the album throughout, and the track-listing is perfect - the cd plays as if it were one song flowing through different phases, not a collection of songs - as any good concept album should. Infact the term 'good concept album' is not applicable here. It would be more appropriate for 'Yoshimi battles the pink robots' to inherit that rarest of terms 'great concept album' which has been passed down from The streets, David Bowie and Van Morrison. Fantastic stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You won't let those robots eat me, 25 Jun 2003
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
ere are, unfortunately, not many albums like "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots." I enjoyed "Soft Bulletin" when I found it at a store last year, but what really dragged me in was the peculiar title of "Yoshimi." It's a fun, sweet, sad, immensely fulfilling album.
The songs tend to have a slightly futuristic feel; first off is the catchy "Fight Test" ("I don't know where the sunbeams end/and the starlight begins/it's all a mystery"), the haunting "One More Robot/Sympathy 3000-21" about a robot developing emotions (don't cringe -- it's done wonderfully), the poignant time-travel song "All We Have is Now," the somewhat more forgettable "It's Summertime (Throbbing Orange Pallbearers" and "Ego Tripping at the Gates of Hell," and the fantastic, almost pleading "Are You a Hypnotist?".
But my favorite tracks may be "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots"; part one is a delightfully cheesy description of a karate girl who is battling the evil robots. ("Oh Yoshimi/they don't believe me/but you won't let/ those robots eat me!") The second part is a funny instrumental, the actual conflict itself, punctuated by Yoshimi's bloodcurdling shrieks and the sound of those destructive pink robots.
If you can't handle music that stretches the imagination, then this isn't your album. Some songs ("Do You Realize?") would fit easily into a different album. But many of them ("All We Have is Now," "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots Pts. 1 and 2," "One More Robot/Sympathy 300-21") have that slightly fantastical, science-fictiony feel. The music is fast and deftly-performed, with the surreal notes that the lyrics demand. The overall effect is fun, catchy, sweet and sometimes quie funny. (The only distracting element was the cheering and applause)
Most albums leave you unsatisfied, craving something indefinable, but "Yoshimi" didn't do that to me. When I finished the last track, I just hit "play" again and listened to the entire album a second time. Highly recommended, a pleasant quirky piece of work.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite simply my favourite album ever., 18 May 2007
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
It looks like the other reviewers have done a good job of giving this album the respect it deserves. I doubt I will be as succinct and lucid as some of them, but I felt I just had to add my tribute.

I have a long history with this record. It started back in 2002 when I went to Amsterdam with some friends and took this record with me. The whole group of us just fell in love with it instantly, and would happily sing along in our mashed up states. These songs are so beautiful that some of them make me physically ache when I listen to them - "In the Morning of the Magicians" particularly.

"Do You Realise" was partially responsible for me getting together with my girlfriend. It's now "our song". I dount many couples have a "song" as cool as ours.

Not long after my girlfriend and I got together, we ate some magic mushrooms and had a bad trip. I had a particularly bad one as I'd taken 6 and a half times more than the recommended dose. While flailing around in the depths of despair and insanity I was listening mostly to the Screaming Trees' "Dust", which I used to like; but perhaps not surprisingly I haven't listened to since. Anyway, as the effects of the mushrooms lessened, and I started to realise that I wasn't dead or insane, I put this album on. Not only did everything get better, with the room starting to glow reassuringly, but Wayne Coyne's lyrics seemed to explain to me everything that I'd been going through, and everything I was then experiencing. It was a beautiful moment, and it helped to make the whole experience both the most terrifying experience of my entire life, and the most enlightening and worthwhile.

Perhaps that sounds sad to you, but I assure you that I feel enriched because of it, and wouldn't change a thing.

I am listening to this record now. I'm at work. On Fridays I always bring a selection of CDs with me, and today I brought Yoshimi, and it is tapping into my emotions and psyche as potently as it did when it was new. I just never tire of this record.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing pyschedelia for a young generation, 14 Mar 2006
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
Well wow! This album grabs you from the first listen.The opening track is worthy of any psychedlic fans attention and is reminiscent of Cat Stevens.The two part Yoshimi... is a brave attempt at threading a concept into the album and works well. The Lips' music has become better with time and this album sees them put new textures and sounds into their already quirky music. There are synthesizers washing in the background along with anime voices to capture the imagination and paint the story of Yoshimi. There are certain themes developed such as life,love,death and positivity throughout - particularly in the beautifully poignant Do You Realise. Overall the album ranks alongside any modern attempt at a concept album without being over-worked and laborious. If you like this lo-fi chilled yet uplifting tunes with a pop element then this is the album for you. Smoke a peace-pipe and enjoy ;)
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Creative and challenging - with great tunes!, 27 Aug 2002
By 
Dave (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
How do you follow up The Soft Bulletin? Easy, you create a album based loosely around the concept of, well, a girl called Yoshimi battling pink robots and saving the world from destruction. Sounds mad? Yes, but it also sounds fantastic. And this is the Flaming Lips, who just don't have it in them to create songs about things that don't matter, they don't care about or aren't interesting or odd or challenging. So here they follow up The Soft Bulletin - science, mortality and loads of other things that probably went over my head - with this. The songs all hang together and tell a story, but it's not a nasty concept album. Because when you take away the concept, the songs should stand up on their own. On Yoshimi they do, regardless of the concept. A lot has been written about Do You Realize? - and quite rightly so, it's a joyous song about death that celebrates life. It's probably the single of the year, but it's debatable that it's the best song on the album. Brilliant from start to finish, Do You Realize? is just one of many, many highlights. Fans will have this already, so I really am preaching to the converted. Non-fans should love this, though. Yes, the song titles can scare people off - but one listen to this should melt even the flintiest of hearts. Constantly creative and challenging, it's also a wonderful album filled with great tunes. And, yes, she does save the planet - what else did you expect?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A realy good album, 13 Aug 2002
By 
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
Billed as a great, i listened to this expecting too much and was initialy disapionted. But this album does improove the more you listen and cirtanly has tunes that justify its high ratings. The general sound is from a melodic and chilled out veiwpoint that is very easy to listen to.
The best track isn't the single, but 'In the morning of the magicians' which is a reflective song following up the battle between Yoshimi and the robots. But it's not the story told that makes the album great, it's the subtle sounds that make the music fit together just perfectly, like the rythmic clappimg in this song appearing only occasionaly to leave you wanting more.
What you get with this album is a very cleverly plotted 11 tracks that all contribute to an upbeat take on, well life.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wondrous album, 19 Jan 2008
By 
The Conman (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
I had been aware of The Flaming Lips for at least a year, but I only decided to buy one of their albums about three weeks ago. Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots was the one that I chose. My initial reaction to the album was very positive, but it has continued to grow on me for the last three weeks.
The Flaming Lips are a weird but wonderful pop/rock band from America, who have constantly challenged themselves throughout their career, releasing many great albums, so I'm told. To describe this album's sound, I would say that it has a fairly poppy sound mixed with large amounts of psychadelia and space rock. I consider this album to be too experimental and complex to be called pure pop. The production is flawless and the band creates a wide sonic palette using synthesisers, electric and acoustic guitars, basslines, strings and drum machines. The effect is that the album sounds symphonic in an electronic way, the various electronic sounds lifting these heartfelt, endearing songs into space.
As soon as the opener Fight Test kicked in with its wonderful vocal melodies and acoustic guitar backed up by squelchy analog synths to create originality and a more psychadelic sound, I was blown away. The production made all of these beautifully crafted and layered sound very clear. However, the album then changed direction in the more subtle and almost ambient One More Robot/Sympathy 3000-21, which uses ominous digital noise and relaxed piano chords to build a large amount of atmosphere, but also makes use of tempo changes for the song's optimistic chorus. This particular track has lyrics that ask the question, can robots learn to feel emotions? The album is packed with lyrical meanings, sung in an always heartfelt and whimsical way by singer Wayne Coyne. On a similar theme, there is the fairly daft but metaphorical tale of fighting evil machines in part 1 of the title track. This is an extremely catchy pop song with a chopped up acoustic guitar riff and bouncy drum machine. Part 2 of the Yoshimi suite is a noisy instrumental, meant to symnolise Yoshimi defeating the pink robots, as crazy sythesizer licks are placed alongside crashing drums and piercing shrieks.
After this, the album seems to shift gears lyrically, encouraging listeners to live life for the present and enjoy it while they can. This is most obvious in Do You Realize?? This is the album's biggest hit, which has a very grand symphonic sound and moving lyrics. However, I actually prefer the preceding song It's Summertime, the album's most beautiful and perhaps moving song, where Coyne sings, "Look outside, I know that you'll recognize it's summertime". This is perhaps telling us when we are depressed to realise that we are in fact living in our golden years (and yes, I do like Iron Maiden). In the Morning of the Magicians is a semi-epic with many beautiful sounds and a more complex song structure thrown in to make give the song a wistful, shifting feel, similar to its vocals and lyrics. There's also Ego Tripping at the Gates of Hell, which has a great bassline, wonderful expansive synths, insectide rhythm and beautiful vocals. This then segues into the moody expansiveness of Are You a Hypnotist? This song has a very spacey feel and is another of my faves. All We Have Is Now is the album's weakest song, but it is by no means bad, and adds to the album's message of living life for the present. The closing instrumental, which won a grammy award, is incredible. The layering of sounds which both contrast and compliment each other make the perfect dreamy atmoshpere to end the album. In this track,and throughout the album, the bands ability to be so strange and creative but also accessible is astounding.
All in all, I am very glad I bought the album. The symphonic layering of electronic sounds, wonderful melodies, heartfelt vocals and lyrics and excellent songcraft make Yoshimi a truly brilliant and inventive album that no one should miss out on. Compare it to just about any pop on mtv today and you'll understand.
By the way, the album covers, both front and back are very cool.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The battle to keep this disc out of your CD player, 15 July 2002
By 
Simon A. Woodhart (Bristol, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
Being somewhat new to the sounds of The Flaming Lips, only having bought The Soft Bulletin two weeks prior to the release of Yoshimi... I am probably not the best person to review this. Well, not for the veteran Flaming Lips fan at least. Saying that I think my views count as much as the next person, so here we go. This album is incredible! Honestly I have not heard anything quite like it. This is some of the most beautiful music I have heard in ages, it is quite staggering. To sum up this music in sound bites would be impossible. It is something close to electronic folk rock, but only due to the fact that this is rock with acoustic guitars, Neil Young-esque vocals and electronics, so classification is rendered quite useless. What this music has in abundance is eccentricity, power, beauty and ambience with well crafted songwriting, intelligent lyrics and sublime production. Listen to songs such as "One More Robot..." , "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots", and "It's Summertime" which are some of the stand-out tracks, to get a small scope of how this album sounds. But the best way to enjoy this gem of a disc is to sit back and listen to it in it's entirety, sit back and drift away, and when it is finished hit play once more. This is quite exceptional.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truely genious concept based album., 15 Nov 2002
By 
M. Young "Amuro Ray" (Liverpool UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Audio CD)
The flaming lips are famous for writting sureal lyrics over brilliant pop harmonies. This album does not differ. This time around the Lips prefare acoustic guitars and sound effects to electric guitars (early lips) and orchestral segments (soft bulletn), yet still shows signs of old lips traits. The songs are brilliant and is hard to pick highlights. Ego tripping at the gates at hell mixes an amazing melody with thoughtful, lost love lyrics. Morning of the Magicians ponders the realitys of love and hate and One more Robot and yoshimi battles the pink robots part one and two tell the story of, as u would guess, a girl called yoshimi fighting pink robots. However as hinted in the "Fight Tests" brilliant pop and lyrics the theme of this story is that sometimes you have to fight for what is right, and with the robot falling in love with yoshimi, that any man can be bought to clarity by love (as the lyrics say amazingly "is it wrong to think its love, when he trys the way he does".
Its Summertime is about dealing with death, and is put amazingly, and "Are You a Hypnotist" emphasises the sudden mystery of love and deception. All We Have Is now has a brilliant tune and messege that you should treaure life and the album ends on a glorious instrumental track. However the highlight of the album is Do You Realize, in my opinion one of (if not THE) best songs ever written. It makes you feel warm and appriechiative of life, and has brilliantly simplistic melodies and lyrics. Alot of the things mentioned you actually don't realize about life and the songs bring you to a blunt, yet strangly pleasing evaluation of life ("everyone you know will someday die, but insted of saying all of youre goodbyes yet them know you realize....") This song, and album is better and more simplisticly genious than anything the beach boys or any band (apart from the lips themselfs on the soft bulleton) have made.
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Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots
Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots by The Flaming Lips (Audio CD - 2002)
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