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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Tramp was indeed Super!
It's great to see Supertramp back in the limelight with the recently released Retrospectacle compilation. Although their repackaged material certainly works well in its own right, I would strongly recommend all of the series of albums comprising Crime of the Century, Crisis? What Crisis?, Even In The Quietest Moments and Breakfast In America - corkers every one of...
Published on 26 Jan 2006 by Julian Heath

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I really like Supertramp, but I must confess I found this ...
I really like Supertramp, but I must confess I found this album a disappointment with nothing very distinctive or memorable about it. I shall not be listening to it very much but prefer the other albums.
Published 4 months ago by A. J. Montgomery


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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Tramp was indeed Super!, 26 Jan 2006
By 
Julian Heath (Bournemouth, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
It's great to see Supertramp back in the limelight with the recently released Retrospectacle compilation. Although their repackaged material certainly works well in its own right, I would strongly recommend all of the series of albums comprising Crime of the Century, Crisis? What Crisis?, Even In The Quietest Moments and Breakfast In America - corkers every one of them.
CWC came a year after COTC - a hard act to follow by any standards - and it stands up well in comparison to that album. Rather than simply produce more of the same the band wisely adopted a more relaxed, less heavily produced approach which has meant that the album has hardly dated at all. Was this really made 30 years ago??
Although Rick Davies is curiously subdued on this album compared with the others (with the exception of Nobody But Me and the spendid Another Man's Woman), Roger Hodgson makes up for it with some of his best-ever songs: in my humble opinion, Sister Moonshine, Soapbox Opera and the utterly exquisite closer, Two Of Us knock spots off the likes of Logical Song and Breakfast in America.
What is also notable is that, despite the vocal/songwriting/instrumental contributions of Messrs Davies and Hodgson, this sounds like a real GROUP effort. John Helliwell embellishes every song with one of a number of wind instruments which he plays with style and panache (not to mention his highly distinctive backing vocals). And as for Dougie Thompson/Bob Siebenberg.... was there a better rhythm section in the business?
Despite its obvious quality, the album was somewhat overshadowed (undeservedly) by COTC and, due to the fact that it was followed by the even-better EITQM and their commercial pinnacle that was BIA, it is the most overlooked of their "classic era" albums. That's too bad but with attention focused on Supertramp again and CWC available in re-mastered form and sounding even better than ever (although the production was pretty damn good in the first place), now is the time to familiarise yourselves with this classic piece of work. BUY IT!
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic, 20 Sep 2008
By 
K. O'Leary (Milton Keynes, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
A very good album which is just a touch below the creative standards of "Crime of the Century". It seems to lack some of the power of that album, but ironically also sounds more mature. The writing is still of a very high standard, and there are no weak tracks.

The sound is actually very similar to the proceeding album in it's arrangements, with plenty of the band's trademark electric / grand piano , but there is now the welcome element of 12 string acoustic guitars which appear on many of the tracks, particularly "Sister Moonshine" reminding me of their later hit "Give a little bit". A Sitar also makes an appearance on a couple of occasions. There are two rockers ("Ain't nobody but me" and "Another man's woman") both penned by Rick Davies, Roger Hodgson appearing to be responsible for the more introspective tracks this time round. Two highlights he contributes are "Lady" (classic Roger Wurlitzer moment), and "The Meaning" (possible the best track on the album). There are also a couple of really beautiful wind solos from Helliwell on "Poor Boy" and "Just a normal day" - I think this is the best work he ever did for the band, which is saying a lot as he rarely disappoints.

If you like Supertramp this is essential, if you like mild Prog / pop and 70's bands like 10cc or Steely Dan you should enjoy this too.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 31 Mar 2005
By 
John Heaton (Budapest, Hungary) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
This was the 1975 follow up to their breakthrough album 'Crime Of The Century' (1974) and has been regarded since as a second class citizen in comparison. But not in my opinion. On this album they continue the remarkable musicianship of 'Crime' and produce what for me is probably my favourite album of theirs. Although it's a mighty close call of course when you have the exquisite 'Crime' and 'Quietest Moments' and the triumphant 'Breakfast In America' to compare against. These four albums from Supertramp from 1974 to 1979 are of such a remarkable quality that one can only marvel at.
And so to this album. The opener 'Easy Does It' is a wonderfully understated opener, but utterly charming nonetheless with its uplifting and slightly haunting melody. And the whistle is great, as great as it was on Lennon's 'Jealous Guy'. An underrated instrument for sure. And then it leads into 'Sister Moonshine' which rocks and charms with such effortless ease. It is one of the very best Supertramp songs without question. Not well known but for those who do know this track you will surely agree! Roger Hodgson gets a rare opportunity here to display his tremendous guitar skills which are frankly and sadly in the background on most of Supertramp's work. 'Aint Nobody But Me' is a pounding piano based Rick Davies number which again features some all too rare and quite brilliant lead guitar work from Mr Hodgson.
But then we come to the cream of this album. 'A Soapbox Opera' is just perfect. I read that Roger wasn't happy with the studio recording. I cannot for the life of me think why. It is pretty close to perfection. And what a great lyric, especially the wonderful line 'Mary...oh tell me what I'm living for....'cos I feel that I'm tossed in the river....have you a son to deliver?'. You don't have to be a Born Again Christian to realise what a great lyric this is. Marvellous. 'Another Man's Woman' is as good musically although Davies' lyric is altogther more down to earth. But just as heartfelt and meaningful as all Supertramp lyrics were from this period. What an incredible last 90 seconds on this song. Musicianship of the highest class.
'Lady' opens Side 2 (vinyl record) in fine style. Again here is Supertramp at their mesmerising best with a pulsating beat and great melody. Invigorating. 'Poor Boy' is quite nice though less memorable. 'Just A Normal Day' sees Davies and Hodgson combine their talent on a great mournful ballad. But it is John Anthony Helliewell's sax solo (or is it clarinet?!) which really lifts this song up into the stratosphere. What a gorgeous and perfect set of notes he plays! 'The Meaning' is decent but unremarkable. But the closing number 'Two Of Us' is perhaps the most perfect Supertramp song on record. Sublime melody, sublime lyric and such a great vocal from Roger Hodgson. The only Supertramp ballad which even comes close to this is 'Lord Is It Mine' (1979). When 'Two Of Us' finishes, one's impulsive reaction to play it again. And that must be the sign of a great song.
God Supertramp were good. Even if in later years after 'Breakfast' they would fail to match their earlier achievements, all I can say is that firstly it is hardly surprising and secondly nothing can detract from this golden five year period of theirs, of which this album reached as supreme heights, and possibly higher in places, than any other. One day maybe more people will appreciate just how good this band was. Until then, we are the chosen few.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crisis, what crisis?, 17 Sep 2003
This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
This is a very good album. It is hard to define the style exactly- its jazzy, rock like , and classical in places too. The opening 'Easy does it' speaks for its self. The next track 'sister moonshine' has a folk feel to it with its whistles but there are two great guitar solos too. Ain't nobody but me and Another mans woman are two of the strongest tracks and very catchy.
The harmonies of supertramp are excellent, especially in my favourite track- Just a normal day. This is a moving track with soaring string passages and great vocals.
The last song is 'two of us' which a gentle , haunting end to the album. This is definately one of Supertramps finest moments- there is no crisis about with this album
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another quality album from Supertramp's zeitgist middle period, 21 July 2010
By 
LXIX (scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
Supertramp's development can be broadly categorised into 3 stages: 1) the first 2 albums before they 'made it' 2) the golden period when Davies & Hodgson were rattling off top tunes with apparent ease (1974-1983) and 3) the period when the band continued after Roger Hodgson left (post-1983).

So, Crisis? What Crisis? is another chip off the block from their golden period. Released in 1975, the album contains 10 tracks. As usual, there's the Davies/Hodgson split (whereby the vocalist is apparently the main songwriter). Classic tracks that have stood the test of time here include "Ain't Nobody But Me" and "A Soapbox Opera".

Made at a time of Britain's economic austerity in the mid-70's, the back cover features a contrasting picture of the lads all looking windswept and interesting on a beach in California. So as the nation was tightening its belt, these guys really were roaring and riding the storm of the 'crisis' back home.

This is a very popular Supertramp album and it contains great variety in style and influence. Definitely one for fans of the band.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Super-pop, 31 May 2013
By 
D. Thomas "D R Thomas" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
A great band Supertramp. Starting life as a bunch of prog-hippies singing plaintive odes to marijuana soaked blokes in faded jeans stinking of patchouli oil and sweat. They then became a stadium band who's appeal crossed over to the mass market with 'Breakfast...' This looks to be a mid-way point. A charming selection of great tunes melodious enough to make the lost milkmen of the seventies whistle with pleasure whilst delivering your full fat and semi. Which is where this album begins...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crisis? What Crisis? Supertramp's finest album?, 22 Oct 2012
Ok, so Crime of the Century and Breakfast in America are the groups better known albums. The latter was a comercial attempt at hitting the USA - it produced some good music but not to the standard of 'Crime'. C?WC? has some excellent music with lyrics to match. It hasn't the depth that 'Crime' offers but the album is definitely more fun and, in some ways, more listenable. Seriously, give it a go.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Some Kind of Progression, 3 Sep 2014
By 
Mr. Peter Steward "petersteward" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
It was always going to be difficult to follow something as good a Crime of the Century, but Crisis? What Crisis was a pretty good effort with some decent, if not classic, material on it.

There's a nice Eastern feel about the opening track and there is a distinctive warmth throughout the album. although at times the material might fall just short of the mark. There is more of a simple feel to this album. Whether that is a good thing or not is open to personal opinion.

At times the music does become more middle-of-the-road but at least there is some kind of progression and in "Two of Us" the band put together one of their more enduring songs. Throughout the album there's plenty to interest the discerning listener.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The supertramp album to own, 8 Aug 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
To me this album gathers a good deal of the band's best songs (not the most commercial ones though) - A soapbox opera; Another man's woman; Lady...
Combined with the album 'The Very best of' these two albums will definitely provide the best of Supertramp. The only drawback, the song 'Don't Leave Me Know' is not featured.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Supertramp how can you go wrong?, 21 May 2014
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This review is from: Crisis? What Crisis? (Audio CD)
Great album and great to hear it again after my scratchy vinyl version. If you love Supertramp you will love this.
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Crisis? What Crisis?
Crisis? What Crisis? by Supertramp (Audio CD - 2003)
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