Customer Reviews


34 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (13)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AND NOW....ETERNITY....
Genius is arguably the single most abused word in the English language, its common, offhand usage numbing it of much of its pure potency. But its hard not to place DJ Shadow under that label, as he's done the impossible. He's produced an album that is as good as its predecessor, "Entroducing" (an album that has been hailed as a classic).
Its much broader in...
Published on 22 May 2002

versus
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars still waiting......
After such a highly acclaimed fist solo album in Endtroducing... which showed Josh Davis to be amongst the greatest and experimental of producers a follow up LP was eagerly anticipated and to an extent demanded by an over-awed audience .
'The Private Press' is as an album as experimental as its predecessor but feels like a selection of individual tracks...
Published on 28 Jan 2006 by Doodlebub


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AND NOW....ETERNITY...., 22 May 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
Genius is arguably the single most abused word in the English language, its common, offhand usage numbing it of much of its pure potency. But its hard not to place DJ Shadow under that label, as he's done the impossible. He's produced an album that is as good as its predecessor, "Entroducing" (an album that has been hailed as a classic).
Its much broader in style and feel than "Endtroducing" and has much more of an innovative type production than his regular cut and paste ethic. Take the track "Monosyllabik" for example: a basic two-bar sample that is shredded and ripped up into tech-funk which sounds like Roy Ayers being produced by Aphex Twin. Another track that is unlike anything heard before by Josh Davis is "Mashin' On The Motorway", it features MC Lateef clumsily crashing into other drivers over a K-Hole funky baseline. Its this sparkling originality that helps me compare this album to other favourites like David Holmes "Lets Get Killed".
But Mr. Davis does tread into older territory with "Walkie Talkie": a scratch-happy thumping beat that has a baseline that feels like a chainsaw buzzing through your head. Here you can refer to his previous classics like "The Number Song" and "High Noon".
Also "Blood On The Motorway" is a beautiful piece of epic soul that reminds us of how deep "Entroducing" was. But this album is not as emotionally weighted as "Endtroducing". It has a brash sense of fun throughout the album. With the twisted skits bouncing around and "You can't go home again" sounding like an instrumental 80's New York pop song that never departs from Shadow's incredible production values.
To sum up, DJ Shadow has created a maginificient soundscape (again), as well as being one of the most enjoyable albums I have purchased in recent times. And I am being honest by telling you that there is not ONE track in this LP that I do not wanna hear again.
Really, its that special.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars COMING OUT OF THE SHADOWS, 9 May 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
It's been six years since Shadow released the ground breaking 'Endtroducting', and six years is a long time to wait for a fully fledged follow up. But was it worth the wait?
When I first listend to it fully, I was a little disappointed. But the more I listend the more it grew. There really is only two points where the record falls down. First being 'Monosylabik', a track created round a 2 bar loop. There is no denying the talent and how pain staking it must have been. But the track is too long and the texture of it bland. The second falling down point is 'Mashin' On The Motorway' A full rap vocal track about a road rage driver creating havoc on the road. The track is delievered with humour and is far too throw away.
The rest of the record shows a man who has not lost his spark. Do not expect to hear 'Endtroducing part 2'. Shadows went out of his way too make sure that the listener can only make limited comparisons. There are elements of electronica,80's synth and 80's hip-hop and all sit comfortably together.
The First major player is 'fixed Income' a big live sounding beat track with lovely guitar and piano sections layered over the top. 'Walkie Talkie' is a simple breakbeat track which transends into an industrial sounding horn. But the first epic is just around the corner.
'Giving Up The Ghost' has all the qualities that I love about Shadows instrumental music. Etheral sounding with a lovely beat and drving bass. It's a slow burner which gradually exposes it's full potential. A real jem on the record. '6 Day War' sees Shadow using a mostly full vocal sample from a 70's psychedelic rock track based around the Israel attack on Egypt, Syria, Jordan and Iraq in 1967, called, yep, 'The 6 Day War'. I wasn't too sure of it at first but proved to be a real grower with a clever use of a marching band type beat to coinside with the lyrical content.
'Monogrel..../Meets His Maker' is effectively two parts of the same track. It has a beautiful ambience to it. With some lovely layers of guitar and pianos and typically Shadow driven beat.
The real stand outs are left to the end. 'Blood On The Motorway' for me is the track of the record. Dealing with the transition from life to death in the second phase. A slow build up with no beat. Just chimes and pianos with a spoken word sample. By the next phase of the track the beat comes in and a Stevie Winwood sound alike comes in with the vocal. All well constructed, brillantly paced a true classic Shadow epic.
Which leads into my second favourite track. The single 'You Can't Go Home Again'. A stright beat driven track with the live sounding beat and precussion. One that'll have your head bobbing without even you noticing. Nice scratchy guitars and driving bass which lead up to an intoxicating driven finish.
This album is not 'Endtroducing' and it doesn't try to be. The flow isn't as well constructed as 'Endtroducing' but when the music on this is good, it's exceptional. A worthy sucessor, kicks all wanna be's to the kerb and show's how it should be done.
Highlight tracks :
Fixed Income.
Giving Up The Ghost.
6 Day War.
Mongrel....Meets His Maker.
Blood On The Motorway
You Can't Go Home Again.
ASB.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grooving Shadow, 4 Dec 2002
By 
Mr. Abbas Rana "abbas_rana" - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
The hooded genius returns with his first solo album of the millennium. DJ Shadow - aka Josh Davies - was responsible for giving the world the haunting and beautiful 'Midnight In a Perfect World' single in 1997. He collaborated with James Lavelle on UNKLE to produce an arrray of splendid tracks, namely 'Be There', 'Rabbit In Your Headlights' and the ultra-cool 'Guns Blazing'.
On this record, Shadow loses the overt guitar riffs and decides against featuring any high-profile vocalists. There are still a fair few characteristic spliced and chopped samples on this record and some more bizarre than ever. Yet it is the amazingly written and produced 'Blood and the Motorway' that grabs the most attention. Emotive Foreigner-esque (for all you eighties fans) vocals sit on synthesized swansong organs and the result is incredible.
There are a couple of infectious instrumentals too where Shadow combines stripped and raw hip hop beats with electronica hooks. 'Giving Up The Ghost' is one such track that springs to mind. Shadow proves that he can still scratch and sample as good as anyone else on 'Walkie Talkie' - a funky ditty powered by heavy basslines.
Admittedly, Private Press takes a few listens before you truly appreciate the array of intelligent and creative sounds and its impressive hooks and beats. It's a clever album and Shadow isn't even afraid to get a little breakbeat and dancey with us on 'Right Thing'. If we're talking about the greatest music artists of our time, Shadow would definitely be up there.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Different, but just as good, 9 July 2002
By 
With "Endtroducing" being widely acclaimed, releasing this disc must have been an apprehensive moment all round. In the six year interval between, DJ Shadow's original and refreshing take on beats, loops and instrumental hip hop have often been imitated. However he continues in his vein to produce an album that is undoubtedly DJ Shadow, but is very different to Endtroducing.
There is a far more evident nod to the breakbeat style of the early eighties in the middle tracks, and the overall feel is one that is not quite so raw and gritty as it's predecessor.
For me, the standout track on Endtroducing was "Midnight in a Perfect World"; here it is "Blood on the Motorway" for similar reasons. It's evocative, emotive and totally addictive. Try listening to it in a dark room with no chance of being interrupted. Fantastic.
Richly layered, putting samples together from the most unlikely of sources, it's a deep and rewarding album that won't disappoint.
Only one gripe - the special edition comes with another disc, at a high price. For the extra cost you get 12 minutes of noodling and beats that I bet most people will listen to once, if you manage to sit through it all. Otherwise I'd have given 5 stars.
Another breath of fresh air and another great album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sensational!, 28 Jun 2002
By 
Michael (United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
DJ Shadow has much improved since "Endtroducing." All the elements that made you love him on that album--the fantastic drumming, smooth melodies, and head nodding groves--are back again and better than ever. A new twist to this album is an 80's modern rock vibe. The drumming has become more fixed than the constant changing in Endtroducing.
The album starts out with a golden era Hollywood sample explaining why this album's taken so long to come out and then launches right away into a classic DJ Shadow tune, "Fixed Income." The next track, Un Autre Introduction, is another intro track. The forth track, Walkie Talkie, featuring lyrics "I'm a bad, mother (deleted) DJ" is a hard core hip-hop song but has a humourous quality to it as well. "Giving Up the Ghosts" reminds me of "Long Stem" (as do a lot of songs on this album), but I dare to say GUTG is much better. "Six Days" is one of the few music tracks that feature lyrics on this album. It has a more low-key 70's ish sound to it than the other songs here and is a bit different from anything that I'm aware of that he's done. Then comes "Mongrel" and "Meet his Maker." These two tracks are of the same ilk and are classic Shadow tunes once again. "Right Thing" is kind of a silly, early 80's progressive techno sounding song with lots of samples. "Monosylabik" I find a bit boring and hard to listen to because of constant quick oscillation of silence mixed within the sampling. Mashin' is another comedy song. It reminds of the opening of "Memory Loss" by Deltron 3030. "Blood on the Motorway" is a very beautiful song featuring, sparsely, vocals from a guy who sounds like Elton John (but don't let that make you not think this is a wonderful tune). This song and "You Can't Go Home Again" are probably the best tracks on this album and that's saying a lot. A sensational end to a sensational album. Bravo!
This is one of those albums, like Endtroducing, that constantly rewards the listener upon repeated listening. I highly recommend.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DJ Shadow deserves credit for this amazing album, 9 May 2004
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
An amazing crossbreed album, with a huge variety of different sounds - some sound like the Avalanches gone psycho, others are eerily chilled out. If you are a fan of UNKLE, Beastie boys, samples and originality theres plenty of new musical corridors opened up by this great CD. Don't be put off by one of the tracks having been destroyed by an incredibly random and retarded TV ad, theres still plenty to enjoy on this masterpiece.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Follow up follows suit, 30 July 2002
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
A few years ago Josh Davis brought his eclectic record collection out of his bedroom and turned the music world on its head with 'Entroducing', fusing dance with hip-hop and funked up samples. In doing saw DJ Shadow spawned countless other lesser 'concept artists'. With the critical acclaim the debut release received, it was always going to take an absolute barn storming follow up to top that record.
Davis' much publicised collaboration with MO WAX's James Lavelle on UNKLE added extra scope to his already growing reputation. It's taken 6 years to arrive but it has been worth the wait. 'The Private Press' certainly matches its predecessor but, put simply, 'Entroducing' will always be his own benchmark.
Less spontaneous than his debut and featuring popular samples (David Holmes also uses 'the story' narrative as an intro), this recording is clearly a more rounded affair. It is, at times, darker too with haunting hooks and vocal loops ('Fixed Income' and 'Six Days'). Clever, impressive and very very DJ Shadow, whilst nothing on here is as standout as 'Stem/Longstem' it maintains a spirit not found amongst many uber produced acts. As a result DJ Shadow aka Josh Davis leaves all pretenders standing in his...........aw forget it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars probably more like 4 1/2 but never mind eh?, 15 May 2002
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
Another excellent album from Josh Davis over all, however a few weaknesses:
Its true that "mashin' on the motorway" and "monosylabik" aren't really the best of DJ Shadow, being overly goofy and too slight to warrant a place as anything more than B-sides.
That said, the rest of the album is brilliant, with "you can't go home again" and "blood on the motorway" ending the album in fantastic style with a mix of strangely 80s derived sounds and pure anthemicism.
All in all lets quit the whinging, the best tracks on this album are much better than those on Endtroducing. The weaker tracks, (of which there are only really two or three) are slightly weaker, but taken as a whole this album is richer and more diverse, with FAR more samples being used per song, and less tracks which just rely on one looped piano all the way through like on Endtroducing.
Basically if you already like DJ Shadow, this album isn't going to change your life, but it conclusively proves his artistry and ability to craft convincing songs from the smallest samples, and is packed with tunes you won't be able to get out of your head for weeks.
Also, there seems to be a slightly more pronounced dance/old skool hip hop feel to various tracks on this album, which only furthers the sense of diversity. Throughout the album the feel is less chilled out and jazzy than its predecessor and with faster tempos, especially towards the end, which is an improvement in my view as it prevents Shadow from being lumped in with idiots like Moby.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Shadow of "Endtroducing....", 11 Oct 2002
This review is from: The Private Press [VINYL] (Vinyl)
After making an album like "Endtroducing..." it's difficult to follow it up, especially if you wait six years for it. But this album is great. It isn't quite as good as "Endtroducing" but it has more vocal work on it (cue Mystikal) and definately has a couple of standout tracks (Walkie Talkie, Six Days, Fixed Income and You Can't Go Home Again). This album is not the same as it's predacessor and though not as good, it certainly illustrates evolution in his work. Apparently Mr Davis is quoted as saying "The songs don't say much about themselves and they're not rocket science. But I just liked the way they went down." Maybe next time it'll be even better. Let's not wait six years for it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worthy celebration of the joys of music, 14 Mar 2006
By 
Elliot Davies "ahttt" (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Private Press (Audio CD)
Read the liner notes: This is abstract post modern music. It's not supposed to convey any messages. It's apolitical and completely without ego. Rather it's a celebration of modern popular music and the position it holds in modern society. Mr. Davis writes that there should be something here to make everyone smile. I think he succeeded there, there is something for everyone. Unfortanately, this is the albums major downfall. The versitility makes for a fractured listen, and there's no guarantee that you'll like every track.
Me, I like pretty much all of it. However, I usually skip past the tedious old skool hip hop of Un Autre Introduction and Walkie Talkie, and Mashing on the Motorway grinds a bit, (the obscenities are funny but anachronistic) but the remainding tracks are pure quality. Letter From Home and Fixed Income make for a suitably ominous opening, setting a mood that is perfectly complimented by my personal favourite, Six Days. It's the song that made me by the album in the first place, and it's easily as good as anything on Endtroducing, if not better.
Ah, Endtroducing, the album to which this will ALWAYS be compared. So how does it compare? Well, it's more song based. Endtroducing flowed beautifully to create an overall satisfying listening experience. With the Private Press, on the other hand, it's easier to dip in, listen to one or two songs, without missing the bigger picture. As an analogy, I'd liken Endtroducing to a stream you kayak down. The Private Press is more like a series of picturesque ponds in a landscaped garden. They should all be judged on their individual merits.
As such, there are some brilliant pieces of music on here. Everyone WILL find something they like about it, but very few people will like all of it. A fractured masterpiece then, like Electric Ladyland or The White Album for the B-Boy generation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Private Press
The Private Press by DJ Shadow (Audio CD - 2003)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews