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Customer Reviews

27
4.3 out of 5 stars
Neverneverland
Format: Audio CDChange
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50 of 50 people found the following review helpful
on 8 August 2002
Almost utterly forgotten because that had no hits and were difficult to pidgeonhole, the Pink Fairies were actually a great band from an era when post-psychedelic hippy rock was evolving into prog and heavy metal. In many ways, the Fairies were the UK's answer to the MC5, a power trio that DIDN'T attempt long bluesy jams or indulge in mind-numbing rifferama but DID prefigure not only early Motorhead (before they succumbed to HM) but punk rock. The Fairies were loud, mean and nasty but they had some humour and subtlety to play with too. Street-cred didn't come any better at the time: the band were bona-fide underground heroes who even made Hawkwind seem like commercial chart contenders. They flirted with radical politics and often played for nothing...
From this debut album the manic rocking "Teenage Rebel" could easily be placed five years later on a record by the Damned or Generation X (but without the drum solo!). They weren't a band that could be comfortably marketed on record and scored mainly through their anarchic live shows. "Never Never Land" does, however, contain some of the band's finest material, especially so this lovingly restored CD with its bonus tracks - highlight of which is the incredible debut single "The Snake", perhaps the greatest unknown headbanging anthem that was ever cranked out of a battered Marshall stack. BUY THIS FOR "THE SNAKE" ALONE AND HEAR 90% OF THE HARD ROCK ACTS OF THE EARLY 1970s PUT TO SHAME!!!
Pink Fairies hit that same street-level hard-rocking style on "Do It", find a jazzy groove on "War Girl" and even indulge in a little cosmic dreaming on "Heavenly Man". "Uncle Harry's Last Freak-Out" was obviously something that made more sense live (and two versions at around 10-minutes apiece may be a bit over-whelming). The Pink Fairies were mad, bad and dangerous to know but their records (for all their uneveness) are definitely worth owning if you're interested in an era when real red-blooded unsanitised rock and roll bands were allowed to outrage our ears...
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 11 June 2012
As most of those who saw them in the early seventies playing live can testify-this was never music for the faint hearted. Being 15, I took every opportunity to catch them around London and Hertfordhire-even seeing a Pinkwind jam in London that was mind blowing without illicit substances. Their gigs were fun, anarchy and even edgy-like where else would Hells Angels and hippies writhe shoulder to shoulder. But it was Paul Rudolph's spitting, snarling, thundering-slightly ripped guitar and the double drummers thundering along sans clothing that typified the rock n roll that other reviewers noted gave a template for later heavy metal and punk. Could be compared to MC5 but more like the Stooges with more fun and hippy piss take. So, we (the fans) waited for the release of this album. I had decamped to NZ with a small collection of prog rock and hoped for a friend to send a copy of this pigeon post (big pigeons in Aotearoa). I was lucky to get the fold out cover and pink vinyl. Still have the cover but the vinyl with much of that era went in a burg. Other reviewers are on the button. It was dissapointing when compared to the live act. But, it grows on you. Can't get the debate re vinyl/CD and remastering arguement. Yeah, the bonus tracks dont add much other than provide a glimpse but heck Do it, Heavenly man, Say you love me, War girl, Never never land all make this a worthwhile collection but also give it its four star rating. Add this to Twink's Think Pink-pick up some of the compilations with live material and you can put together a good mix of Pink Fairies music. And from the heart, thank you John Peel for show-casing live their version of "Tomorrow never knows" in 1970. They played it as that almost unknown mob the Beatles should have, cranked up, Mr Rudolph as if he was just learningh guitar licks 101 and the whole falling apart at the edges and so in keeping with their/those times.Fantastic anarchy Fairies style.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 26 January 2007
So these chaps use to play for free outside the pay to get in festivals. I would rather have rolled one up and just listened and watched this band! They got a contract and on this fab debut, improvised jams that they were use to, became an LP, if you like to hear music free flowing then I recommend this to you. super long guitar jams and no widdly diddly solo`s. It is a dam good album ,there are a few slowies just to let you have a quick breather!then GO,and its back to the biz to think it 1st came out 1971 ish!!A classic time capsule.
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on 29 June 2015
Once upon a time Gary had no record player, so he was unable to play his favourite discs. He missed his Pink Fairies records a lot, especially this slightly less wild first one where the boys seem to have ingested considerable substances for what Augustine called their 'Inner Man.' One fine day Gary found these things released on CD and bought them, this was his dearest one for it had 'Do It' ("You're gonna rip me off man" the singer sang, crossly), 'War Child' and 'Uncle Harry's Last Freak Out' on, the smooth hippieness of which he listened to once more and found it was (still) good. It's sometimes said that the 1960's really happened in the '70's and the tight riffing and imaginative textures are redolent of that time, melodies are shaken and tweaked to evoke an inner landscape of ingenuity and, at times there's pathos and subtlety to boot. This is one unusual band at their highly creative peak. Their early single,'The Snake,' is a meaty bonus, he had mentioned as the best sub-Hendrix boogie he had ever heard; it was fine to discover he had not been wrong and that naughty Mr Rudolph, a man keen on what the Dormouse had told White Rabbit to do by way of Grace Slick, if perhaps more excessively than even Dormouse intended.. Yes he was now sure, "Feed your Head" was exactly what Mr R. had been doing and more, those other lads too. So it is a PHOTOCOVER then? Yes, very likely. The sounds on this thingie aren't quite of this world and aren't quite like the riffing and rumble of anyone else. This is one you just have to buy, it's as fresh as something very fresh indeed. Brilliant. From a time when the world was young and sky and sea and land were one....and death was but a dream: When Men Were Tall as Trees.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 30 November 2010
Simply the best album ever released by them, and you get two renditions of Uncle Harrys Last Freakout as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 28 June 2014
I was so glad to find this classic album again as I had'nt heard it since the mid 80s when my vinyl copy became unplayable. Which was well used when I aquired it. When the cd arrived, and well within time may I add?, I was pleased to observe that it was in perfect condition and played flawlessly.Thank you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 17 October 2014
Unequalled in rock history this one album contains all the collective genius of a dying breed ; every inch a master piece of allegory ; imagination ; invention and driving rock ; the Pink Fairies have it in spades . Competition irrelevant . Irrelevent.No 1. MM.
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27 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on 26 August 2002
This, the first of The Pink Fairies records, was released in 1971 and then followed by What A Bunch of Sweeties and Kings of Oblivion. All three have recently been re-released with additional bonus tracks. The Pink Fairies arose from the remnants of Mick Farren's band, The Deviants. Farren was a leading light in the alternative scene of the late 60s, and ten years later was writing for the NME during the punk explosion (for more details see his excellent biography Give The Anarchist A Cigarette). The Fairies themselves were still on the road in the late 70s, and their single Between The Lines was one of the first releases on the Stiff label. The booklets that come with the reissues make a major point of crediting The Fairies with pre-dating punk rock. I'm not sure about this - apart from drugs, what else did hippies and punks have in common? Answer - they couldn't play their instruments very well. OK, The Beatles and Paul Weller, amongst many others, weren't great when they started, so this really isn't the point.
There isn't much on Neverneverland that suggests instrumental virtuosity, and this isn't the point either. There are two drummers, Twink and Russell Hunter, bassist Duncan Sanderson, guitarist Paul Rudolph, and very few keyboards. Apart from Twink they all try to sing which is perhaps why almost all the tracks are fun, especially now, listening with 30 year's hindsight (sight?). No doubt about it, Do It and Teenage Rebel are almost punk songs, but many of the other tracks find The Fairies flirting with hippy oblivion - the guitar soars whilst the vocals drift. This applies to Heavenly Man, War Girl, Never Never Land, and Track One Side Two, but even these tracks have an underlying rockiness. The harsher side of their music comes out on Uncle Harry's Last Freakout. You get two versions of this, with and without vocals. The vocals give the 10-minute version a bit more edge, but swamp some of Rudolph's finer moments. Listen out for the electronic bleep that should focus your concentration as Uncle Harry starts to drift away! War Girl is a personal favourite, with whispered vocals that definitely work, Say You Love Me is a fine pop song, even though it carries many of the trademarks of its time. It might have made a more successful single than either Do It or The Snake. The second of these shows that The Faires liked a laugh. The lyrics could have been written by one of Benny Hill's scriptwriters, but it's fun, rather than offensive, and the words don't really harm the only one of the 4 bonus tracks that offers anything new. You then get editted versions of Do It and War Girl, and finally poor old Uncle Harry stretched out to 12 and a half minutes. With these extra tracks Neverneverland extends to 70 minutes, but this may be a case where more is actually less. Even I find it difficult to listen to The Fairies for more than an hour! In small doses - and Do It which opens the album is a good sampler, if you don't like it, don't do it - there is enough here to make this CD well worth buying - if you like guitar driven rock played by hippies with a sense of humour.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
The first and best of the Fairies albums, Never Never Land captured the band at their anarchic best . Those who were there at Phun City and the earliest Glastonbury Festivals will never forget 'Uncle Harry's Last Freak Out' and the absolutely wonderful guitar of Paul Rudolph......
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 8 September 2004
The first album from the Pink Fairies was a curious beast. Released in 1971, it has not aged as well as some of the other albums of the period with some tedious space jamming that should have been left on the stages of the free festivals that the Faires were to play at during this period. When your audience is suffering from too many illegal substances, anything sounds good. However, so not let this put you off. The Fairies were quite capable of rocking out. Their first single, Do It (included here on CD for the first time in it's edited form remains a manifesto for the revolution that never quite got off the ground, a gutsy affirmation that the Pink Fairies were never to eclipse. Also included is its turbulent B-side, the similarly barnstorming The Snake who's opening guitar salvo is one of the rawist ever put to vinyl. Great stuff. Say You Love Me and Teenage Rebel continue the band's rockiest tendencies, but they did have a softer side, as shown with the song Heavenly Man. The free festival crows pleaser Uncle Harry's Last Freak-Out is represented here twice in both its 11-minute LP form and among the bonus tracks, the 12-minute instrumental prototype that was one of the band's first studio attempts at the piece. Needless to say, both are as relentless as the title insists and to some ears may be a bit over the top. Not all of the songs were to my taste but this is a fairly good debut album and for anyone interested in this period of music, this is a must.
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