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When Do We Start Fighting
Format: Audio CDChange
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 3 February 2002
Right, lets clear one thing up to begin with. The first track is NOT "Cloaking", it is merely a brief instrumental which leads into "Cloaking", which although is stated as track one on the packaging is really track two. Confused? Good.
"Cloaking" was in fact the first single to be lifted off this album, and with its crunching guitars and shouted chorus, it's not difficult to understand why. This is 2 and a half minutes of classic indie/rock, and sets a high standard for the rest of the album to follow. Thankfully it does.
"Western Battle" is another slice of well-engineered Indie guitar rock which has been sorely missed in the recent influx of American "Nu-Metal" and teen angst bands which tend to focus on impressing little boardies by swearing a lot instead of containing any real emotion or talent (aka Papa Roach!). "Pleasurehead" slows the pace a little, David Line's lilting vocals set against a soft melodic guitar creating a beautifully calm mood, culminating in a sublime guitar finale. "What May Be The Oldest" and "People Are Underestimated" highlight Seafood's interest in using two vocalists. The latter features drummer Caroline Banks on vocals, and is a beautiful beat driven tearjerker with a gorgeous and touching chorus. "Splinter", seafood's biggest selling single to date, is once again pure quality indie, and is most notable for Line's strong vocals. "In This Light Will You Fight Me" is a similarly arranged song to "People Are Underestimated", Bank's vocals again adding a new depth and dimension to Seafood's sound, and the song itself builds to an all out guitar led crescendo, Line's screeching vocals cannot fail to raise the hairs on the back of your neck. "Desert Stretched Before The Sun" is a very laid back, basic acoustic song which highlights Line's vocal abilities. "Similar Assassins" however, is a rousing song with touching verses and an emotional chorus, and is quite possibly the highest point of the many highs on this album. The final track, "He Collects Dust", with its spoken word verses is an interesting and carefully constructed end to an interesting and carefully constructed album. Seafood have created a sound which is both powerful and prominent, yet at times calm, emotional and beautiful, a mixture which has not been successfully achieved by many bands of late. Line's vocals have the power to add depth to the heavier tracks, yet works best when coupled with Bank's backing vocals. Seafood are an exciting band- if you don't own this album, buy it already!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 5 August 2001
i heard about seafood through kerrang! magasine, and after hearing the adrenalin rush that is 'cloaking' I was quick to go out and buy it.Not all the songs are a tour de force though;there are some calm acoustic ballads until the tide comes in with tunes such as western battle.You'd be silly not to give this london 4-piece a try.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 7 August 2001
This album is definately uk album of the year so far. Seafood play the chill out to rock out better than most. With production by eli janney and some vocals on a track by scott mccloud from the fantastic girls against boys make this album a must simply blistering. rock on........
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 24 March 2002
Now this album has been out for almost a year now and has sold by the bucket load but for all that didn't buy this the first time round heres your chance to give them shot. And at this price considering its 2 disks and includes 8 tracks its well worth it! Not only do you get the 3 hit singles 'cloaking' 'splinter' and 'western battle' you also get a stonker of a bonus disk which includs live preformances and demos! A must for any seafood fan and defently worth a try for those that havent yet heard much or any of seafoods great songs. SO WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? BUY NOW!
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on 9 August 2001
When this first arrived through the door I was mildly excited. I've seen Seafood loads of times, and I really like them. So I opened it up to see what was in store for the 'difficult' second album, and to my horror what I found withheld in that shiny little disc was wrong. It should have been a Magnum shot to the head of distortion, and heartfelt melodies surely. But no, I was presented with a collection of down tempo numbers, with a couple of blips of overdrive. Hmmm? Was this acceptable, should I give up hope, and just realise that they've pulled a 'Llama Farmers'? No I shall persevere.
After a few listens this record is growing on me. Cloaking is still as good as it was when I reviewed it. From then on Western Battle is true to form Seafood. Like This Is Not an Exit with balls. This song is a prime example of where the band have moved on since their debut. Babbling backing vocals and layers of guitar really add that depth which previously was missing. What May Be the Oldest is the highlight of this record; a beautiful, passionate song, with Mary Lorson of Madder Rose sharing the vocals. Like the Carpenter's being played by Built to Spill. The general studio work on this record is a lot more accomplished too. Eli Janney (GVSB) really pulls all aspects of the music out to the foreground, which, when they are worth it produces some amazing songs, but you may guess what's coming, not all of the songs are worth it. People Are Underestimated is b-side material at best, with it's sampled beat and breathed vocals, sounding like a old man banging one out whilst partaking in perverted phone calls. Some things never change though. Caroline still hasn't learnt anymore drum rhythms. Her and the Grandaddy drummer could make a concept album around that!
This isn't a bad record. It reminds me more of their first singles, especially Desert Stretched before the Sun, with it's drooled vocals, and acoustic tinkerings. A more chart friendly effort overall, possibly why it was released on Infectious instead of Fierce Panda. Can they see a new Ash cash cow ahead of them? Me thinks yes.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
'When do we Start Fighting,' the third release and second album proper from London's Seafood, continues the evolution shown between the scuzzed-up Pavement-esque guitar pop of 'Messenger in the Camp' and last year's alternately bruised and wired 'Surviving the Quiet.' The most obvious and immediate difference on this album is in the production: it was recorded in NYC with Eli Janney from US punk pioneers Girls Against Boys, and this has given the record a more aggressive, bass-heavy sound than its predecessors. This is clearly on display in songs like the adrenaline rush of first single 'Cloaking' and the unhinged 'Splinter.' However, this doesn't mean that Seafood have abandoned the wistful ballads of the earlier records: the acoustic 'Desert Stretched Before The Sun' is a low-key delight, and the reworked version of 'What may be the Oldest' featuring backing vocals from the great Mary Lorson (of Madder Rose and Saint Low fame) is one of the album's stand-out tracks for me. Talking of backing vocals, this album sees drummer Caroline doing a lot more singing than on the other records, especially on 'People are Underestimated' and the gorgeous lovesong 'Pleasurehead.' I got the impression that singer David has written his most personal batch of songs yet for this record, and this seems to reflect a new-found confidence in the band. The album sees them experimenting a lot more than previously, using a drum machine on 'People are Underestimated' and drawing on the influence of seminal US post-rock band Slint on closer 'He Collects Dust,' with its spoken-word narrative. All in all, a triumphant return from a band who remain (undeservedly) in relative obscurity...
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on 3 November 2010
why why why did seafood not make it big after this album , it is a semi-classic piece of british indie rock , a great album start to finish,with great lyrics and some superb musicions belting out great music, a totally under rated band -its criminal , anyway dont take my word for -buy it.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 20 February 2002
I picked this cd up when I was in England, and am sad to see that no one in Australia has heard of Seafood.
This album is sinply fantastic. It's one of the few albums that contains diversity. Songs like Cloaking and Splinter are rocky, heaps of fun, yell-along-and-mosh-in-your-car type thing, songs like Like a Desert Stretched Before The Sun are adorably simple, classic and beautiful.
If you don't buy this cd, you don't deserve to have ears.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 10 April 2002
In fact i dreamt i had the perfect music sound within my desk draw. 'When do we start Fighting' is'nt it but it definitely sounds chords. I love this album, but then you've probably guessed that. 'What May be the Oldest' i'm pretty sure was on my dream CD. The male/female thing is quite incredible.
Obviously Cloaking and Western Battle are the most immediate tracks on the album but the CD takes a different direction after this. If you've ever heard of/been into Novak or Quickspace you're getting close to what's going on here. I'm quite drunk now and just listening to What may be the oldest over and over (i.e. on repeat i guess about 15 times so far).
Basically you're dealing with not a great deal of originality - Western Battle takes off from a Placebo song i'm sure and 'He collects Dust' shares Brian's passion for Abba type dialogue; i've already mentioned Quicksapce and Novak; and if you think of a guitar based Death in Vegas you're not far away - but you're also getting great lyrics an incredibly apt melancholy mood that Sparklehorse fans could definitely get into and some genuine music for the more mature alternative community. True they get a bit too Travisy / Muse like on 'Similar Assassins' for my liking but hell if i could have pulled this out of my draw i might have stopped dreaming. It's pretty close to what i wanted... and that it isn't, well i'll get over it, i'll just skip too People are Underestimated and stay awake for awhile.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 6 April 2002
Not gonna say much, other than BUY THIS ALBUM!!! Seafood are such a diverse band, this album demonstrating it well. From the onslaught of 'Cloaking' through the lyrical masterpiece of 'Pleasure Head', the catchiness of 'Similar Assasins' and ending with the dreamy 'He Collects Dust'. Tracks in between all being winners. This album is immediately addictive. An addiction I have no desire to cure.
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