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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Britain's Most Underrated Band
Jack's spectacular inability to achieve a commercial breakthrough of any kind, in the UK at least, is one of those little injustices that can irritate during idle hours spent driving to and from work. Over the last three months, many of those hours have been spent in the company of this magnificent third album.
For anyone who's been along for the ride from the word...
Published on 9 July 2002 by Glenn Ensor

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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Jack suffering 'difficult third album' syndrome
After their stunning second album 'The Jazz Age' its maybe surprising that Jack have taken off in a slightly different direction for their 'difficult' third album. Whilst after initial hearings there is nothing comparable in quality to 'The Jazz Age' these tracks do grow on the listener. The largely experimental 9 minute opener 'End of the Way it's always Been' sees...
Published on 12 Jun 2002 by Santa Dog


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Britain's Most Underrated Band, 9 July 2002
By 
Glenn Ensor (Folkestone, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The End Of The Way It'S Always Been (Audio CD)
Jack's spectacular inability to achieve a commercial breakthrough of any kind, in the UK at least, is one of those little injustices that can irritate during idle hours spent driving to and from work. Over the last three months, many of those hours have been spent in the company of this magnificent third album.
For anyone who's been along for the ride from the word go, the opening two tracks on the album are a bit of a shock. Where lunar landscapes, heavy orchestration, stretched ballads and the odd rocker have previously dominated proceedings, this album's title track and the single "Emperor of New London" incorporate an almost brutal dance sound from the off, with guest "narrators"
Kirk Lake and Dan Fante relieving Anthony Reynolds of vocal duties. The music is surprising, full of drama and never releases it's grip. Absolutely brilliant.
From there on in, it's back to more familiar terrain over the next seven songs, most being of luxurious length, with ballads and pure pop (Disco Cafe Society) having the upper hand. Still, there seems to be greater emphasis on rhythm than on previous outings, and it adds a great dimension to the band's overall sound.
The songs are just grand throughout, and if anyone writes a better song than "Maybe My Love doesn't Answer Anything in You Anymore" this year, I'll be surprised.
This record deserves a lot more pairs of ears than it's going to get, I fear. Do yourself a favour. Get hold of a copy before it's deleted. When it turns up on some music rag's "Buried Treasure" page in ten or twenty years time, you can allow yourself a wry smile. You'll still be listening to it.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Jack suffering 'difficult third album' syndrome, 12 Jun 2002
By 
Santa Dog (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The End Of The Way It'S Always Been (Audio CD)
After their stunning second album 'The Jazz Age' its maybe surprising that Jack have taken off in a slightly different direction for their 'difficult' third album. Whilst after initial hearings there is nothing comparable in quality to 'The Jazz Age' these tracks do grow on the listener. The largely experimental 9 minute opener 'End of the Way it's always Been' sees Anthony Reynolds take on the job of narrator over a sub Radiohead style backing. 'Disco Cafe Society' sounds like something Pulp would have rejected but still retains certain appeal. Maybe we can forgive Jack for the rather self indulgent tracks that make up at least half this album when the 10 minute plus closer 'No North Left' is such a welcome return to form, ensuring the listener goes away satisfied. So not a fantastic album, certainly not another 'Pioneer Soundtracks' or 'Jazz Age' but a grower and one you can learn to love.
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The End Of The Way It'S Always Been
The End Of The Way It'S Always Been by Jack (Audio CD - 2002)
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