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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb in every respect
Unlike many, I was a big fan of the original Icewind Dale. This retains many of the features of the original (notably the wintry setting and lots of combat) but improves on it in every respect.

First off, it's beautiful to look at. The icebound landscapes are dramatic and you really feel as though you're in the far north; there's a tangled forest taken over...
Published on 20 Nov. 2002 by C. C. Williams

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars r.i.p infinity engine...
i was disappointed in NWN so i had high expectations for this one. ill get right onto the problems with this game for they are many and frustrating. this is quite simply not a finished game. it suffers from bad level design throughout - pitting you against whole screens full of the same monsters. move a few more inches and more appear - this is unimaginative and tiresome...
Published on 3 Feb. 2003 by Amazon Customer


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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb in every respect, 20 Nov. 2002
By 
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
Unlike many, I was a big fan of the original Icewind Dale. This retains many of the features of the original (notably the wintry setting and lots of combat) but improves on it in every respect.

First off, it's beautiful to look at. The icebound landscapes are dramatic and you really feel as though you're in the far north; there's a tangled forest taken over by unnatural forces which feels genuinely oppressive and eerie and the remote monastery set into a mountainside is truly a sight to behold. The new monsters have been exquisitely drawn and animated - you'll love the driders, for example - and Icewind Dale still has the best iron golems in the business.

The incorporation of the third edition D&D rules is a huge enhancement and they have been very well incorporated. Character creation is a delight and the constant improvement of your characters is a major motivator for playing the game. The incorporation of feats makes for great variability within the same character class. No longer is a fighter just a guy who whacks things with swords until they're dead; instead you can choose to create an elven finesse fighter who wields two swords and can hit a penny with an arrow from thirty yards, a half-orc bruiser who can dish out tremendous punishment with a two handed sword or a dwarven tank who can take everything the bad guys can throw at him and then repay it with interest. Balance is excellent: you can choose to play a drow character who appears to have enormous powers but who also has limitations which makes him or her no better or worse than a plain human.

There is lots of combat in Icewind Dale II and it is extremely challenging, particularly in the earlier stages when your characters are still quite weak. Enemy AI is fearsome: you can't just pick the bad guys off one at a time using the fog of war as cover; instead if you attack one creature, all his mates join in. Worse, they don't just attack from the front but go round and creep up on you from behind, targeting your weak sorceror who's been merrily tossing fireballs at the frontline bad guys. Worse still, once an enemy targets your weak sorceror, he won't let up and won't be distracted unless your other characters surround him. This is how you play, right? You kill the magic user before worrying about the guys with the spears. Despite all the fighting, there is nonetheless room for diplomacy and deceit. You can avoid many hard fights either through flattery, intimidation or downright lies and you get the same experience as you would have got had you put the enemies to the sword instead. In earlier games smarts and particularly looks were mere candy. People who played the games by numbers would set intelligence and charisma to 3 and everything else to 18. Well now, many dialog options depend on these characteristics (not to mention many skils and feats) and they are only available to you if you're a good looking guy or girl with a magnetic personality, a glib tongue and wits to match. Even better, dialog options depend on the class of character being spoken to. Your bard can discuss philosophy and history while you'll want to kick your paladin's backside when he graciously refuses a reward or gets you into a really tough fight because he just can't keep his views to himself.

One of the major criticisms of the original Icewind Dale was the plot which did have a tendency to go something like: "Are you the bad guy?" "No, but I can tell you who might be.". Now you're waging war against a sinister organisation which has forged alliances with all manner of malefactors and disaffected elements and you are forever plugging breaches and cutting off one tentacle only for another to appear elsewhere yet emerging victorious against overwhelming odds (as I said elsewhere, the difficulty level is high). You may not have a particular commitment to the welfare of the Ten Towns of Icewind Dale, but the bad guys sure do get under your skin so that you want to punish them (the rewards are attractive too). Interestingly, the main villains aren't villainous for villainy's sake but are human-demon crossbreeds, mistreated as children, who are now taking revenge against those who hurt them and those who have slighted and shunned them.

Icewind Dale II is set thirty years after the original game and events from that game have repurcussions in this one. If you played Icewind Dale your characters would have killed a priestess of Auril called Lysan. In Icewind Dale II her death means that the Aurilites are just one of the many enemy forces allied against you. I won't give away other cross references because coming across them is just of the game's many delights.

Humour, sparingly applied, is the icing on the cake. If you have fond memories of pen-and-paper Dungeons and Dragons and your characters carried iron rations, ten foot poles and fifty feet of rope, you'll find a lot to make you chuckle. If you played the original Baldur's Gate, there's a scene around a campfire which will make you laugh out loud.

Any faults? Not many. Your characters' pathfinding seems to have become dreadful again having been quite good in Icewind Dale and Baldur's Gate II. I haven't found any major bugs but there are a couple of unimportant ones. Nothing else comes to mind.

Bioware seem to have given up on the Infinity Engine and have bet the company on going 3D. I don't know what's with the fetish for 3D because Neverwinter Nights is a rubbish game which looks terrible and runs like a dog. Icewind Dale II, on the other hand, looks gorgeous, is totally immersive and runs very nicely thank you on almost all systems. If Icewind Dale II is the last Infinity Engine game, I will be most sad. Anybody fancy starting a petition?
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent D&D game, 13 Mar. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
Until I loaded up this game, I hadn't realised how long it had been since I'd played a game with 2d graphics. In 2003, it seems, even the most lowly isometric viewpoint RTS game features dynamic lighting, high polycounts and rotateable maps. Icewind dale 2 sticks to the old school, using a (slightly) improved version biowares 2d infinity engine.
When you first load the game up and start playing, you might feel nostalgic, but you certainly wont be particularly impressed with the tiny sprites, limited animations and begrudging use of transparency. After many hours of play however, I'm very glad the designers stuck by the infinity engine, in fact I'm wondering if the designers of Neverwinter Nights got it all wrong. In single player, Icewind dale 2 plays so much better than NWN it really makes you think that maybe Dungeons and Dragons is better in 2d.. Bioware got it right the first time.
The background graphics are lovely, varied and athmosheric. Its much easier to navigate when the backgoround orientation isnt constantly changing, so you don't need to use a minimap constantly to see where you are, you eyes rarely leave the action so, oddly, its easier to feel immersed in the game. The interface is perhaps not as powerful as it could be, but its easy to understand and looks great. Sprites, however, are average, a little small perhaps, but they do the job. There are some nice finishing touches.. like daylight and weather effects, even snow. Some things are a little grating though, the infinity engine seems to impose limits on colour (even on 32 bit mode), so shading tends to be dithered. This is particularly noticable on the edges of the 'fog of war', the black cloud obscuring unexplored areas, wich has pixelated edges rather than smooth shading. This looks very ropey in 2003.
Sound is good.. with great voice acting and spot effects. Some of the music is a bit poor, although its fine in terms of quality, its just not to my tastes.. not enough of it either.
Having a tried and tested game engine has allowed the developers to concentrate on gameplay much more. IW2 is simply the best Dungeons and Dragons RPG to date. The emphasis on managing an entire party is great fun (and a pleasent change from most recent RPGs) and combat is exciting, strategic and never feels out of place. Best of all, however, is that the game design in terms of storyline and balance is simply superb.. nothing ever feels there 'just because'.. everything fits together beautifully, and the plot is as well thought out as any good fantasy book.
The only flaw with the game is that it sometimes feels very 'pre-ordained'.. particularly after something like Morrowind, which was so free-form. Until, that is, you remember two things.. (1) that IWD2 is a Dungeons and Dragons game, whith the computer taking on the role of the dungeon master.. and (2) if the game is still immersive, varied and fun, its not important wheather or not you can go where you like, when you like. IWD2 sticks to its limits and excells within those limits.
Much like your in-game party of adventurers, the graphics, sound and gameplay in Icewind-dale work togeher beautifully to really fire the imagination. In the end, the 2d 'representative' graphics draw you into the game rather like a good book. IWD2 succeeds by not spoon feeding you flashy graphics that try to look real, so that most of the action takes place in you head.
I've used the word 'beautiful' quite a few times in this review.. IWD2, like football, is a beautiful game.
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149 of 155 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lots of ice but with a hot beating heart., 19 Sept. 2002
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
So, this came as a surprise. Neverwinter Nights was meant to be the end of the Infinity engine, used for classics like Baldur's Gate and of course the original Icewind Dale. But here then, months after the (3D) release of NWN (Neverwinter Nights), is Icewind Dale 2. In 2D. Using the 4 year old Infinity Engine.
So, is this a bad thing then? Most definitely not. NWN struggled to create a convincing world in 3D - but the luscious backdrops in Icewind Dale II are clearly much more detailed and realistic and most important of all: convincing. While NWN lacked atmosphere, IWD II has loads of it. The spell effects and the character animations are well designed too - not to mention resolutions of up to 1600*1200. So in the looks department, it still holds its ground quite well.
And now to the game - in many (and maybe even all) ways it's a huge improvement - over the original and even Baldur's Gate. The character system has been vastly improved. For example dialogue options will change according to the class of the person who conducts it or the skills of that person - making the game feel more lenient and freeform. Also, you can now avoid fights if the spokesperson of your party has a high degree in Diplomacy.
Quests are also very original at times - and many quests can be solved without having to raise a sword which is an interesting change from the original. For example one quest is about breaking a time loop by talking to people and changing the future - and past.
The game uses the 3rd generation of D&D rules which allows a character to change classes - so instead of being stuck on one class you can advance in another. This allows a fighter to be skilled in stealth and lock picking or a sorcerer to stand his own in a fight. Great in theory though in practice most people will prefer to stick with specialized characters instead of having 6 party members who can do a bit of everything but none great at anything.
The fighting has been slightly improved too with the ability to use several preset weapon sets so you can switch between a sword, bow or axe in mid-combat. Also, the interface for each character is customizable allowing you to put each favorite spell, potion or magic object on the bar for immediate use. All inventory weapons have been redrawn too, creating a fresh new look replacing the old and tired look of the original and BG1&2. The interface has been rearranged to let you see more of the gaming area. And while the control system is more or less identical to the other games in its line, it still works perfectly with the option of pausing mid combat to change tactics and select spells.
One of the biggest improvements is the story though, which, while basic at its simplest, is well defined and worked out. NPC (non-player characters) are well written and don't feel as shallow as the ones in the original. And it really feels as if you're making a difference in the world with people cheering your progress - and the game allows you to see the changes in their attitude towards you which makes it all the sweeter.
Still, there are some problems: it can be easy to get stuck if you miss one object. For example I left a book behind on one occasion which I needed to advance to the next part of the game. Problem is, I forgot where I dropped it and, unlike NWN, you can find all essential objects in a pool. So I had to reload and replay a big part of the game.
Also, fighting is often based on chance - which is only logical as the original pen & paper D&D games were also based on chance. Except it can get frustrating at times here and it can feel as if you don't have enough control over your party members.
But all in all this is a great game that any fan of the original should definitely buy. Especially the ending truly is great which is unusual for a game using the Infinity Engine. Just give this one a chance, even if you love NWN and think you won't be able to return to plain 2D. Because, this game just might prove you wrong.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars r.i.p infinity engine..., 3 Feb. 2003
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
i was disappointed in NWN so i had high expectations for this one. ill get right onto the problems with this game for they are many and frustrating. this is quite simply not a finished game. it suffers from bad level design throughout - pitting you against whole screens full of the same monsters. move a few more inches and more appear - this is unimaginative and tiresome especially since alot of these fights are tough. most of the character portraits and soundsets are from the first game and the new ones arent particularly fantastic (certainly nothing on the NWN artwork). the fellwood is probably the shortest but most frustrating area devised for a game (alot of people on the bioware message boards got so fed up at this point that they stopped playing). again this is an example of terrible level design - there is no indication of what to do or where to go. if you dont have a ranger with extraordinarily high wilderness lore you wont be progressing for several days without a walkthrough. the battles and areas are uninspired and the whole thing looks inferior than the first icewind dale and BG2 thanks to the fact that bioware didnt implement 3d acceleration for spell effects.
some of the dialoge even has spelling mistakes and with the new patch the battle square section is stupidly hard - they REALLY expect you to go 1 on 1 with an elder earth elemental with no summoned units or part members to help? and do it in 60 seconds? this simply isnt possible even at high level. towards the end of the game everything drops a +4 weapon. yawn. this is inferior to the original icewind dale in every way imaginable. if you have played heart of winter and trials of the luremaster then icewind dale 2 is essentially an extended version of that.
those disappointed in NWN and looking for another BG2 - you will most likely not find it here. i recommend the original icewind dale or the planescape series.
i really wanted to give this game a high score as i thought the first icewind dale was fantastic and i thought that with the extra years of experience the design team would turn out something that reflected the amount of time they put into the infinity engine series. sadly this is not the case.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hooray, yet more goblins.., 1 Dec. 2002
By 
M. Knell (Zürich, Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
I haven't played all the way through yet as I've rather lost heart with this game. It's very good, don't get me wrong - the graphics are stuffed full of good old-fashioned Infinity Engine goodness and the rules are, sensibly, now D&D 3rd Edition compliant. The plot is engaging, the action is heroic, so what's the problem?
Battles. There are too many battles. The Baldurs Gate and Icewind Dale series offer some excellent roleplaying, but it seems that ID2 has taken a leaf out of the Dungeon Siege guide to game design and involves battle after battle with not much chance for roleplaying. Party members dying left, right and centre and constant reloading to try and find a lucky way through yet another battle with yet another million goblins make for a frustrating gaming experience. The game feels unbalanced as a result.
It's still a great game (hence the four star rating) and irresistible to anyone who's a fan of the series, but it would have been a little nicer if the game had been a little bit more forgiving and varied as far as battles are concerned. Being attacked by a gazillion goblins and orcs gets old quickly.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but..., 14 Dec. 2002
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
Alright, alright. I admit it. I bought this game because i loved Baldur's Gate 2. I didn't buy the original ID because ID2's release was imminent (in august. Then it was put back about eight times). But I heard good things about ID2. And, to start with, I was engrossed. It took me two hours alone just to create my party, which is a good thing of course, and for the next week I proceeded to make my way through the first four chapters (out of 6). However, on chapter 5, the whole thing started to get repetitive. I know it's supposed to be all battles, and I wouldn't mind that, *if* I had any desire to get ot the end of the game to see what happens. Battles and statistics could only keep me interested for so long; and the complete lack of a plot (or a plot so boring there might as well not be one) as well as no side-quests at all makes ID2 just that: battles and statistics. The lack of side-quests is worse than the lack of a plot by far, my favourite part of Baldur's Gate 2 was the second chapter, where you had to choose quests to earn a certain amount of gold.
Of course, it's not all bad. The characters level up much faster in ID2 than in BG2, and are much more customisable thanks to third edition D&D rules (not that I know anyting about D&D). And the Infinity Engine still makes all the backgrounds look amazing, even if the characters and monsters aren't that great.
Well, I'd give it three and a half stars if I could... and I think I'll go and play it now, just to see if I get back into it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shame about the linearity, 22 Jan. 2003
By 
Mr. Mat Gray (Southampton, Hants United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
Fantastic settings, addictive levelling-up and character enhancing (just one more level before I crash out, honest), great new portraits. Superb usage of the suberb infinity engine. Just one thing, its too damn linear. I know we all harp on about BG2 - but it was soooo good it deserves to be harped on about. The first Icewind Dale was too linear, and so is IWD2. I guess it has more of a storybook quality to it than the BG series, so perhaps its justifiable. But its so annoying that there's only one way to do anything. If you want to advance your quest, you HAVE to go here, then there, then there, etc...Having said that, now I've completed it on Insane mode, I'm about to restart on HeartofFury mode. So it can't be all that bad. Guess I'm just hooked.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A solid action roleplaying game and a fitting swansong to the Infinty Engine era, 23 Mar. 2014
By 
A. Whitehead "Werthead" (Colchester, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
A band of adventurers are among the mercenaries called in to help defend the remote settlements of Icewind Dale after they come under attack by an army of monstrous creatures. Investigating the causes of the raids, the team embark on a lengthy trek into the hostile Spine of the World mountains.

Icewind Dale II was released in 2002 and was the fifth and last game to use the Infinity Engine. Originally used for Baldur's Gate in 1998, the Infinity Engine had powered a whole series of classic roleplaying games and was arguably the last great 2D engine before most games switched to 3D technology. At the time of its release, Icewind Dale II was heavily criticised for using old tech, made even more apparent by it coming out just a month or so after BioWare's Neverwinter Nights, with it's all-singing, all-dancing 3D engine.

Played without regard for such concerns, Icewind Dale II emerges as an enjoyable, solid roleplaying game much in the vein of its predecessor. The Icewind Dale games are very much the 'brainless action movie' branch of the Infinity Engine tree, where combat is emphasised over roleplaying. There isn't anything too wrong with that, especially since Icewind Dale II also puts more emphasis into puzzle-solving, quest-resolving and occasional bursts of proper roleplaying. You still spend 80%+ of the game hacking enemies apart, but there's a little bit more story and character to proceedings this time around.

As with the previous game, you create a party of six adventurers from scratch. Balancing melee combat characters with ranged ones with magic users (and a rogue to help open all of those locked chests of loot) is key to completing the game effectively. Unlike the other Infinity Engine games, Icewind Dale II uses the Dungeons and Dragons 3rd Edition rules which gives your characters much greater choices of weapons (no more arbitrary restrictions by class), classes (no more arbitrary restrictions by race) and skills and feats, which improve your combat abilities.

You start the game in the town of Targos which is under goblin attack. After dispatching the attackers you find yourself running around town getting to know people and finding out more about what's going on. This being a game by Black Isle (which splintered apart shortly after this game's release, the remnants reforming as Obsidian and Troika), with such CRPG luminaries as Josh Sawyer and Chris Avellone working on it, the game features some amusing meta-commentary about the genre. One soldier recounts how he started his adventuring life by killing rats for ages because it was 'character-building', whilst running around town doing trivial odd-jobs for pitiful amounts of money. This was funny at the time, but is slightly tragic in 2014 given how many modern RPGs still insist on using the same structure.

The game is linear, with your team moving from objective to objective without as much ability to go off and do some exploring by yourself (although there a few optional side-quests). This makes sense in the context of the game - you are a mercenary party on a military commission to halt an invading army - and also given the time restrictions the game was made under, but it does feel a little constraining at times. The game is also pretty relentless and, in the midgame especially, becomes something of a grind. The environments are beautiful, ranging from palaces made of ice to spectacular underground caverns and windswept mountain passes filled with snow. However, too often there is little to do in these environments rather than bludgeon lots of things to death and search for loot. There are a few moments of satisfying roleplaying - doing a side-mission near the end of the game makes the final battle considerably easier, whilst you can completely skip a lengthy and lethal battle in a mind-flayer fortress by convincing their relentlessly logical leader that it's just safer to let you pass - but the focus is very much on fighting.

Fortunately the fighting is pretty good. As usual you can pause the game to issue orders and battles soon become a frenzied rush of arrows, swords swinging and spells flying past. As the game progresses enemies become more likely to use magic, so it becomes necessary for your party to use magic to buff your characters or summon small armies of monsters to act as cannon fodder. Unlike, say, the Dragon Age games, which have a seriously tiny spell selection (presumably for simplicity's sake), Icewind Dale II offers a large range of spells, weapons and combat options which can tend towards over-complexity, but also give the player a satisfying choice of tactics to pursue. Many seemingly-impossible battles can be won by simply changing tactics or even just the positioning of your characters: bottlenecking large enemy forces in narrow passages is a simple but often decisive tactic.

So the combat is good, the choices for character development are better than any previous Infinity Engine games and the story is moodily and effectively told through animated storybook cut-scenes. For its time, the 2D graphics are impressive (if inevitably a little pixellated on modern machines) and the music is splendid, though there isn't a whole lot of it. The game is pretty long (clocking in at well over 20 hours) so you get a lot of content for your money. The game gets grindy and repetitive at times, but it's worth persevering for the satisfyingly epic conclusion.

Icewind Dale II (****) is a worthy follow-up to Icewind Dale and a decent conclusion to the Infinity Engine era of roleplaying games. You can get the game now from GoG, where it has been optimised to run well on modern machines, or you can also get it as part of a triple-pack with the original Icewind Dale and its expansions (UK, USA).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, but no Baldur's Gate 2, 19 Oct. 2007
By 
Geoffrey Millar (Brunswick Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
I can't recall when this came out, but I bought and played it after playing Baldur's Gate 2, easily the best RPG and one of the best PC games ever.

Icewind Dale 2 looks great, plays well enough, but lacks the scripting and character interraction which, among other features, made Baldur's Gate 2 so interesting to play. It is also very linear and does not have the sort of quest options which would have given it more depth.

The graphics are worth a look and it will take you many hours to finish, but I doubt that having got to the end, you'll want to replay it.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More of the same - so what?, 25 April 2003
This review is from: Icewind Dale II (Video Game)
I just couldn't stop playing Baldur's Gate, BG2, Icewind Dale, Shadows of Amn, and Throne of Bhaal, so when IWD2 came along, it was next on my shopping list.
Quite simply, this is more of the same. Same interface (with some small and interesting changes to the graphics), same controls, same everything really. Thankfully this range of games, for the right kind of people, is addictive and interesting - drawing you into the fantasy world for hours and hours on end as you build up your repertoire of spells, money, armour, weapons, scrolls, experience, and the like. Fantastic!
Check the storyline out: "The civilised realms are threatened. The Goblinoids have united and the Orcs are advancing. Will you face the hordes and protect the ten towns?" Smack of a certain world-famous trilogy by a certain J.R.R. Tolkien? Maybe... Anyway this has nothing to do with it...
Now there's over 300 spells, new monsters, "hundreds of new items", new races (dark elf, half-orc), new race sub-classes, two-handed fighting style, "auto-balancing game-play balances the conflict to match your skill level" (I must be very good 'cos sometimes I don't last long!!!)
Your characters leave a ship and step onto the famous white snow of Icewind Dale, and straight into combat with packs of Goblins. I'm about ten hours into the game and I must admit I've not met up with much except Orcs, Goblins, Goblins, Orcs, Orc Archers, Orc Shamans, Goblins, Orcs and the odd Werewolf. However I still hold out for more variety as the game progresses - Baldur's Gate and IW Dale never disappoint.
All in all, more excellent adventures (this time a mite tougher than before) - you start off with little so you can build yourself up (as opposed to starting off at a higher level of experience). Excellent - keep these games coming!!!
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Icewind Dale II
Icewind Dale II by Avalon Interactive (Windows 95 / 98)
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