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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The weakest of the four series
It's the last of the J&W series, and this is where they nearly jumped the shark. The magic formula of this outstanding series so far had been to provide the excellent cast with a well timed and almost scrupulously close adaption of Wodehouse' stories for the screen. Well, Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry are as good as ever, just as Elizabeth Kettle as Honoria and Elizabeth...
Published on 30 Jun 2003

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Jeeves in Drag
Jeeves would never, never, under any circumstances appear dressed in women's clothing. Still less would he be likely to sing in public. I doubt Bertie would cross dress.
This is a travesty of Wodehouse and I suspect owes more to the inflated ego of the producer who seems to believe that he is a better story teller than Wodehouse than any attempt to show...
Published on 28 Jan 2005 by A. H. Piercy


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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The weakest of the four series, 30 Jun 2003
By A Customer
It's the last of the J&W series, and this is where they nearly jumped the shark. The magic formula of this outstanding series so far had been to provide the excellent cast with a well timed and almost scrupulously close adaption of Wodehouse' stories for the screen. Well, Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry are as good as ever, just as Elizabeth Kettle as Honoria and Elizabeth Morton as Madeline, to name but a few of the supporting roles. It's the script that somewhat spoils the fun. Maybe some TV producer had the misbegotten idea to spice up the old-fashioned Wodehouse originals with a certain slapstick element, or perhaps Clive Exton felt the need to challenge himself to improve Wodehouse' ideas. The result is not very convincing. The episodes start as usual with either one of Bertie's previous fiancées starting to renew the matrimonial prospects or a friend being in need of Jeeves' help in matters of heart or business, and there is still much witty dialogue to enjoy. But instead of the elegant solutions we were used to from Jeeves, we now get Wooster grilled by lightning on top of the Empire State Building, Jeeves and Wooster jumping overboard from an ocean liner on high sea with a subsequent return of the two some months later in rags with shaggy beards (the most un-Jeeves imaginable, he would have seen to Wooster shaving and dressing up under any circumstances), and a ghastly singalong of the whole Totleigh Towers society including the notorious Roderick Spode. So while this is of course better than 99% percent of what you see when you turn on the TV any day or night, it's a bit of a let down after the first three series. On a technical note, it's also the worst DVD of the series in terms of sound and picture quality, which is a bit strange since it's the newest material.
So before you buy this, take one of the earlier series if you can. And if you already have them all, you will want to have this anyway, even if it's not quite as good.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stop it now. You're just being silly., 13 Jun 2004
By 
Richard Hart (St. Andrews, Fife United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
When watching this charming installment of the adventures of the Last of the Woosters and his gentleman's gentleman, one has the suspicion that the Major from Monty Python's Flying Circus is going to turn up and say 'No - stop it now - I warned you. It started off as a perfectly sensible story about a man with daft aunts who didn't want to get married, but now you've just made it silly.' And he'd be right. Another series and the reputation of these glorious productions would have been spoilt, but as it is, they just escape with their dignity intact. While there is something quite Woosterian about jumping off the side of a boat in the mid-Atlantic to escape an impossible social situation (this is the man, after all, who cannot avoid being engaged to someone unless someone else gets engaged to them, because refusal is simply not an option) it does show an element of daftness that is not quite the mannered, weirdly logical daftness of Wodehouse. It is also a little disappointing that some of the sets have been changed, so we are no longer in the familiar Berkeley Mansions of the first three series. That said, the combination of Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie and P.G. Wodehouse is infallible. There was no possible way it could be bad. Thus, while very enjoyable, it does leave a strange aftertaste of dissatisfaction. Please don't let my criticism put you off it, as it is really quite wonderful. Just be certain to watch series 1-3 first.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scintillating as usual, 12 Feb 2003
By A Customer
The delightful pair Fry & Laurie is once again back. The fourth series starts off on "the other side of the pond", whereas the last three episodes is set to the old "metrop", as Wooster would have said. The actors perform wonderfully as always in this series, but I feel they have not been given enough good material to work with in this fourth part. The writers meddle too much with the original stories, and they seem to have got this mediocre and odd idea of "developing" the charachter of Jeeves. He is here found in a drag, with a beard, incognito etc. This is not a very "wodehouseian" setting, and what is more, I do not think neither Wodehouse nor Jeeves would have liked it. But if you can overlook these minor flaws (as I would have to call them, being a hardcore Wodehouse fanatic), this DVD is of course spiff-ho, top of the line, first class material. Splendid, spledid!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Jeeves in Drag, 28 Jan 2005
By 
A. H. Piercy (Norfolk, England) - See all my reviews
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Jeeves would never, never, under any circumstances appear dressed in women's clothing. Still less would he be likely to sing in public. I doubt Bertie would cross dress.
This is a travesty of Wodehouse and I suspect owes more to the inflated ego of the producer who seems to believe that he is a better story teller than Wodehouse than any attempt to show Wodehouse's genius. If like me you are a lover of the true genre do not touch this abberation with a bargepole.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Definitely the weakest of the four, 17 Oct 2004
By 
Androo (UK) - See all my reviews
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Clearly Wodehouse was running short of ideas for our favourite gentleman's gentleman and his sidekick. Almost every plot here involves Bertie swearing he won't pull off some ridiculous stunt, but capitulating so he doesn't have to marry some girl or other, usually Madeleine Bassett. It's all very well once, but every episode? One also grows tired of Spode threatening to break Bertie's neck in every scene, and there are some scenes where it all goes too far and ends up being just silly.
Highlights are Jeeves pretending to be a woman, and... not much else.
Get it if you have to see the whole jolly lot, but be warned: compared to Series 2 (the best one) this is thin stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Much Obliged, Jeeves!' - the final set of episodes featuring Bertie and his valet Jeeves, 19 Dec 2013
Well, here we are again! And it's the final season of that enigmatic comedy duo Jeeves and Wooster (played wonderfully by Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie). I have to say Stephen and Hugh are superb in their roles of Jeeves and Wooster and are devotee P.G. Wodehouse fans. Again this is a season divided into two halves. The first half of three episodes is set in New York, America and the second half of three episodes in England. This has to be my favourite season of the series, with its sunshine quality that I enjoy watching in the lead up to Christmas.

This series is again directed by Ferdinand Fairfax who puts in so much love and attention into these stories and creates a dynamic and almost movie feel to the episodes. It's lovely to be back in America again and also to have Jeeves and Wooster up against the likes of Spode who by this point had become my favourite character from the Jeeves and Wooster universe. As part of Christmas tradition, I watch these episodes close to Christmas, especially the last three when I wake up early on Christmas Eve to watch them in my dressing gown and having corn flakes for breakfast. It's something I haven't broken from over the last ten Christmases, amazingly.

EPISODE 1

This first episode is exciting and very entertaining to watch. Bertie's back in America with Jeeves and has got himself entangled with American painter Gwladys Pendlebury (played by Deirdre Strath) who he believes to be romantically interested in. She gets Gwladys to paint a picture of Aunt Agatha who comes to America (now played by Elizabeth Springs, who I've seen in many classical productions) in order to win her approval to marry the girl. But Aunt Agatha immediately disapproves of the picture and Gwladys becomes angry with Bertie and leave him in a huff. She eventually marries Lucius Pim (Marcus D'Amico) - an advertising agent for Slingsby's Superb Soups - by the end of this episode, which annoys Bertie since he doesn't like men with wavy hair.

Bertie's Aunt Agatha comes to New York along with his cousins Claude and Eustace (played by Jeremy and Joss Brook) who have recently been expelled from their studies in England. She wants Bertie to see to it that they're sent on a boat to South America to begin a new life. But during a night out on a town, the Wooster twins become infatuated with a beautiful `fat singer' called Marion and they decide to stay in New York to try and woo her, much to her annoyance and frustration. They even wear big beards to disguise themselves in order to avoid Aunt Agatha, which freaks Marion completely.

Tuppy Glossop also returns (played by Robert Daws). Tuppy is now in America trying to make a deal with the stern Slingsby (Harry Ditson) who runs Slingsby's Superb Soups to try and sell a special recipe of soup to him. Tuppy also is intent on marrying the radiant Elizabeth Bickers (whatever happened to Angela, I wonder). But Elizabeth is easily jealous whenever Tuppy takes a look at another pretty girl, and storms off to the country leaving him. Bertie and Jeeves come up with the solution to bring Tuppy and Elizabeth back together again, by having a little child to say `Kiss Tuppy' to bring them together, that is if they have enough `toffees' for him to say and hopefully not say `Kiss Toffee' instead.

This is a really good episode full of fun and enjoyable and a great way to start the final series. There's a catch `soup' song with pretty funny lyrics based on `You Do Something To Me!'

EPISODE 2

This next episode features the return of Lady Florence Craye from series 3, episode 5 (now played by Francesca Folan who was Madeline Bassett in the first season of the series). She's now engaged to one of Bertie's old friends Stilton Cheesewright (played by Nicholas Palliser) who's got a pretty bad temper and wants Bertie's head calling him a `snake in the grass' when he finds out he was once engaged to Florence. Florence won't have it when Stilton becomes violent and immediately warms to Bertie's charms who finds himself engaged to her again. Bertie has to find some way to break out of it with Jeeves' assistance.

This episode also features Florence's father Lord Worplesden (Frederick Treves) who's trying to get to meet face-to-face with Chichester Clam (John Cater) on a boat deal but is always getting harassed by the press when they want to interview him. Bertie and Jeeves try to get them together by various means including rowing boats in rivers; meeting a Bertie's flat and even Clam dressing up as a gorilla in a zoo. All these schemes turn sour, until Jeeves comes up with the idea of the two men dressing up at a fancy dress ball at the Empire State Building where an electrical storm occurs and everyone's gathered for the party.

Bertie also helps out his friend George Caffyn, the Broadway Musical director (who appeared in series 3, episode 3, now played by Nigel Whitmey who I've seen in `Carrie's War'), as he wants to marry Lord Worplesden's niece Nobby (Jennifer Gibson). They use the meeting with Worplesden and Clam for George and Nobby's benefit to get the money for the Broadway show and for them to be married. But they also use a different means, much to Bertie's disapproval where he has to insult Lord Worplesden over his eating habits for George to come in and stop him. That doesn't work, since George falls asleep over his work. But it all works out in the end.

Another cracking good story and some lovely performance by the cast all around.

EPISODE 3

This last episode set in America has Bertie singing `If you're blue and you don't know where to go...' by Irving Berlin in his apartment before going out for a spot of lunch and meeting up with his friend Bingo Little (Pip Torrens) who's also in New York. His uncle Lord Bittlesham (Geoffrey Toone) happens to America on medication provided by Sir Roderick Glossop (from series 1 and 2) who's also in America too. Bingo is now in love with a waitress at a New York diner who turns out to be Rosie M. Banks (Anastasia Hille), the author of all those novels Bingo's read to his uncle to win his approval to marry another waitress back home in series 2, episode 6. This doesn't go down well for Bertie who finds himself running away to avoid a confrontation with Bingo's uncle and Rosie M. Banks who becomes Bingo's wife who wants to sue Bertie in using her name in vain.

This episode features the return of Sir Roderick Glossop (now played by Phillip Locke who I've now seen in a `Doctor Who' story called `Four To Doomsday') and is with her daughter Honoria (Elizabeth Kettle). Bertie tries to soup things up in order Honoria to become engaged to an American doctor working for Sir Roderick, only for him to end up being engaged to Honoria again. Sir Roderick also wants to marry a nurse at the establishment he's in (since he's recently divorced by his wife Lady Glossop who eloped with someone). This nurse is Myrtle Snap (Veronica Clifford) who soon becomes frightful to Sir Roderick once he's engaged to her and tries to run away getting back on a ship with Bertie to England.

Bertie, in order to break from his engagement to Honoria, finds an theatrical agency run by Jas Waterbury (David Healy) to get a girl to act as her fiancée. Bertie gets Waterbury's niece Trixie (Serretta Wilson ) to act as her fiancée, much to his disapproval and shock when she turns up since she has a horrible squeaky American voice. But it's only for a short while and the trick works but it's the American doctor in love with Honoria who turns up and punches Bertie on the jaw. Jas Waterbury soon wants Bertie to marry his niece Trixie, and Bertie is horrified with the threats he makes by bringing in a former wrestler named Porky Jupp (Paul Kynman) to persuade him. Bertie and Jeeves soon get onboard the boat back to England to avoid this, but it turns out everyone that Bertie's seen in this episode turning up on the boat and wanting a piece of their mind on what he did to them. Bertie and Jeeves soon jump overboard and swim back to England and end up all beardy and swarthy when returning to the flat in London.

This is a very complex episode with very cleverly interwoven plot threads, that's both entertaining and funny at the same time. Brilliantly well-written for this series.

EPISODE 4

This is the first episode set back in England and features the return of Aunt Dalia to the series (played by Jean Heywood), as well as Lady Florence Craye and Stilton Cheesewright who return to England, and Stilton still wants to break Bertie's spine in three places which soon becomes four and five places.

Jeeves gets to dress up as a woman novelist from America in this, and Bertie also dresses up a maid at Brinkley Court in order to save Aunt Dalia's pearls being discovered as fake by his uncle Tom Travers (played again in this series by Ralph Michael from series 1).

Another good episode that I enjoy watching to start the day on Christmas Eve.

EPISODE 5

Based on the novel - 'Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves', this episode returns us back to Totleigh Towers where we have returning Spode (John Turner), Sir Watkyn Bassett (John Woodnutt), Madeline Bassett (Elizabeth Morton) and Gussie Fink-Nottle (Richard Braine) who now wants to break up from Madeline over the vegetarian diet she's put him through and marry the new cook Emerald Stoker (Emma Hewitt). We also have in this episode returning Stiffy Byng (played again by Charlotte Attenborough from series 2 who I prefer) and Stinker Pinker (Simon Treves) who want to secure a vicarage from Sir Watkyn and wants Bertie to steal an African totem believed to contain evil powers.

This episode has Bertie dress up as an African chief with amusing results, and also a runaround with the African totem from one place to another before ending up at a fair.

A great episode which ends up Spode engaged to little Madeline, and everybody being so happy including Bertie who sings a song at the piano with everyone around him.

EPISODE 6

The final episode of the series and is based on the novel 'Much Obliged, Jeeves'. It features Jeeves and Wooster returning to Totleigh Towers attending the wedding of Madeline Bassett and Roderick Spoke. Also featuring many returns including Tuppy Glossop, Lady Florence Craye, Aunt Agatha, Sir Watkyn Bassett and Constable Oates (who appeared in this and the previous episode, now played by Sydney Livingstone). There's also returning to the series Brinkley (Fred Evans), Bertie's former valet when Jeeves left him during the trombone incident in series 2, episode 4.

This episode tells the story of the theft of the Junior Ganymede Club book, containing all the secrets and information about valet's master's personal details including Bertie's. The book was stolen by Brinkley in order to nobble on the election campaign occuring in Totleigh between the Labour party and the Conservatives. One of Bertie's friends Ginger Winship (Jullian Gartside) is up for the election for Conservatives and is also engaged to Lady Florence Craye. Ginger makes a muck of being a candidate and eventually leaves with a girl called Magnolia who absolutely adores him, leaving Bertie to the mercy of becoming engaged again to Florence.

But Bertie gets to even more trouble when he finds himself engaged not only just to Florence but also to Madeline as well since Spode has gone himself for the election and she decides not to marry Spode and marry Bertie instead. This puts Bertie in a quandary and tricky predicament as he tries to prevent Madeline knowing he's engaged to Florence; and Florence knowing he's engaged to Madeline in a very funny sequence when he faints in Florence's room trying to get back the club book which she has in her possession. Both Bertie and Jeeves try to get the club book back in order to use something recent about Spode to weaken him and stop him going for parliament and marrying Madeline in the end.

Tuppy gets to be a plumber for a change and has his own plumbing machine when he comes to Totleigh Towers to sort out some plumbing problems with the sinks, baths and toilets. He calls himself `Plumbo Jumbo' wearing a moustache and has to avoid Spode recognising him since he ruined one of his `Black Short' rallies concerning turnips.

This episode is brilliant only for it to end on a very downing ending, where the pulpit during the wedding ceremony of Spode and Madeline erupts with water as a result of Tuppy's `Plumbo Jumbo' plumbing machine. Everyone blames Bertie for no reason, and he and Jeeves run around the church lots of times escaping the wrath of the bride, the groom and all the other guests in attendance. It's a very unsatisfactory ending for me as it doesn't seem for me to be fulfilling for a show as brilliant and funny as this.

I do hope this isn't the last we've seen of Jeeves and Wooster as Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie have played the parts so well and certainly have done them justice. Perhaps they'll come back to play Bertie and Jeeves in some form or other in the future. Now is the best time as any. I'm hoping they'll do a Christmas special perhaps basing it on the latest Jeeves and Wooster novel called 'Jeeves and the Wedding Bells' by Sebastian Faulks, to reunite this pair together. I certainly hope so.

So `Jeeves and Wooster' is still my favourite comedy-drama series set in the 1920s/30s, starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie who do such wonders with their parts. If you're looking for relaxation and enjoyment of nostalgia set in the Roaring Twenties or Thirties, then this is the one for you. If you want the complete box set on this, see here.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I think it is great, and the humour is brilliant, 8 July 2014
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I think it is great, and the humour is brilliant, so funny, I will be buying each series bit by bit.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good light hearted film,, 6 Aug 2014
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G. Glover "Wild Monkey" (England) - See all my reviews
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Still a good film, funny as usual. However not quite as good as the first 2 series.
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic comedy brought to life by Fry and Laurie, 4 Oct 2000
By A Customer
The fourth series of "Jeeves and Wooster" takes our heroes to places that their creator, PG Wodehouse, never imagined, but retains his comic style. By this stage, Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie have become the perfect valet, Jeeves, and the ever-bewildered Bertie Wooster so memorably that Bertie's expressions of panicked idiocy and Jeeves' tactful but complete control of his master remain constant, even as the situations in which they find themselves become ever more farcical. A series of mishaps and misunderstandings which not even Jeeves can solve brings Bertie dangerously close to the altar - and with a girl even more hideously unsuitable than those he has managed to escape from with the aid of his valet's intelligence. The solution they eventually find will surprise even the most devoted Wodehouse fan. Anyone who has not made the acquaintance of Jeeves and Wooster on the page or the screen should go back to the first series and enjoy the hours of pleasure this classic duo will bring. Fans of previous programmes should need no urging to enjoy this stylish and entertaining adaptation of one of Britain's funniest authors.
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Jeeves & Wooster: Complete 4 Season [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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