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64 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kieslowski's Masterpiece
I will make no pretence of neutrality in reviewing these films; I believe the Decalogue to be the greatest work of art, in any medium, of the last twenty-five years. Moreover it deserves its place alongside the very greatest works of the whole western canon.
In a remarkable achievement Kieslowski and his scriptwriter Piesiewicz, succeed in taking a somewhat hackneyed...
Published on 12 May 2002 by Mr. David R. Watson

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the original version!!!
They took away the original credits with Zbigniew Preisner's wonderful music and placed a ridiculous quality images with some other music.
Published 1 month ago by jota


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64 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kieslowski's Masterpiece, 12 May 2002
By 
Mr. David R. Watson (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
I will make no pretence of neutrality in reviewing these films; I believe the Decalogue to be the greatest work of art, in any medium, of the last twenty-five years. Moreover it deserves its place alongside the very greatest works of the whole western canon.
In a remarkable achievement Kieslowski and his scriptwriter Piesiewicz, succeed in taking a somewhat hackneyed idea and drawing from it something compelling, fresh and above all humane. In taking the Ten Commandments as a starting point for ten films, they could easily have delivered a pious or sentimental homily on the place of those imperatives in modern society. Instead they turn an unflinching eye on the inhabitants of a vast grey housing estate in Communist Poland, revealing both the petty motivations and the small moments of redemption in their lives. The role of the commandments in each film is often oblique and ironic, yet undeniably pertinent. Characters are pushed to the brink, not in grandiose moral fables, but in deeply felt and often sad little tales. Even the subject of a brutal murder is delivered without judgement, allowing us to see both the squalid nature of murder and the equally squalid response of the state apparatus. There are no comforting answers, no beautiful effects and cathartic endings such as he offered in his later (and more famous) “Three Colours Trilogy”; instead he offers us a truly humane vision, which neither judges nor excuses the meanness and perversity at the centre of his characters’ lives. Given the extreme nature of Communist Poland one might expect the films to be too deeply enmeshed in that country’s problems to speak to a western audience. To their credit the films do not deny the effect of local conditions, yet are not limited by a parochial vision. As with most great art, its specificity gives it an authenticity that allows it to speak way beyond the limits of its own time and place.
Kieslowski employed different cinematographers for the different episodes, giving each film a distinct character without destroying the unity of the whole project. What makes these works all the more remarkable is that they were originally made for television under the harsh rule of Communist Poland. One wonders that such work could be made by a state enterprise and be shown on state television. But then it is equally hard to imagine films of this type being made for British television in the current climate of a commercially driven industry happy to deliver unremitting pap to uncritical audiences.
Two of the ten episodes received Cinema release in slightly longer versions under the titles “A short Film About Love” and “A short Film About Killing”. There are sufficient differences between the TV and Cinema versions for separate DVD releases of the two films to be desirable.
Kieslowski was a very great artist and “The Decalogue” will come to be seen as his masterpiece. Buy it before it disappears from the catalogue.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic East European Cinema, 1 Feb 2006
By 
L. Davidson (Belfast, N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
"Dekalog" consists of ten ,one-hour long films ,each based loosely on one of the Ten Commandments. Each film is set in a stereotypical drab ,high-rise housing estate in Warsaw ,during Communist rule in the 1980's. It would be flippant ,and a gross over-simplification, to say that "Dekalog" is like a cross between "Play for Today" and "EastEnders", but Kieslowski's ten films do have certain similarities in format to these two programmes. The estate is like a huge, high-rise Albert Square and each film is like a well-constructed play ; each one dealing with different types of social, personal and emotional issues and all containing impressive and intense acting performances by the cast. The character portraits that Kieslowski draws in each episode of the "Dekalog" are exquisite. The ten films are for the most part earnest and grim , without much light relief for the viewer. They are ,most certainly,not a barrel of laughs . All of the films deal with events that put a strain on loving personal relationships ; mostly between parent and child and husband and wife. Other common themes featured in the ten films are those of loneliness, alienation, regret and despair. Also, in nearly all of the films , a taciturn young man (Artur Barcis) appears .He neither utters any words nor interacts with any of the characters. He appears whenever the main character in each film faces a serious moral dilemma or personal trial. Is he God , an angel or a demon ? Can he even be seen by the other characters in the film ? Each film is slow paced and filmed superbly by Kieslowski ; many beautiful images are portrayed and he captures the vast range of emotions of his characters perfectly. We also get a vivid picture of life under Communism; a drab, uniform landscape where doctors, counter- assistants, IT workers, university lecturers and taxi drivers all live in the same utilitarian high rise estate. However beneath this deceptive ,surface greyness are a myriad of individual lives and relationships filled with love, regret and despair, which mirror those found all over the world and are common to the human experience. Kieslowski binds all of these themes together with religion and the Ten Commandments in particular. He shows in his films how the Mosaic Law is relevant to today's very different world and what the consequences are of ignoring these instructions. "Dekalog" is split into two discs , "1-5" and "6-10." The highlight of "6-10" is "Dekalog 6" about a young peeping tom , who gets more than he bargained for when he turns fantasy into reality. "Dekalog 9" was also a favourite of mine, as an impotent surgeon tries to keep his marriage together. "Dekalog 10" is the most light-hearted of the films , as two ,very different, brothers discover a shared interest in philately. If I was to make one criticism of the films, apart from their unremitting seriousness, it would be about the English subtitles. The quality of the English translation in my DVD wasn't the greatest and sometimes they didn't stay on the screen long enough for me to read them properly.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Authentic Mastepieces of the Late Twentieth Century, 9 Dec 2000
By A Customer
These ten films are the greatest achievement of European film making in the last twenty years. Shot with a visual economy and brutality of style which grew out of Kieslowski's work in documentary, they are at once profoundly wise and unflinchingly honest. Each individual film is a self-contained masterpiece, almost aphorisitic in their brevity and understated rhetoric. All the works concern various individual and overlapping lives on a vast Polish housing estate, and are filmed in colour which seems to have been drained of all but the most sombre hues. The theme of each film is drawn loosely from the ten comandments and explores what those imperatives might mean in a modern context. There is a profound sense of locality, with the films growing out of specifically Polish experience, yet never seeming parochial. Seen through Kieslowski's lense that vast housing complex really does become an entire world. The most famous of the series are those which gained independent release as "A short film about Killing" and "A short film about Love", but make no mistake, the quality of all the works is uniformly high.
Anyone who has come to know Kieslowski's work through later films such as "The Double Life of Veronique" or the "Three Colours Trilogy", might be surprised by the absences of beautiful effects and flights of poetic fancy. These are not films which offer the comforts or almost mystical catharsis of his last works. Instead they turn an unflinching gaze on some ordinary lives, focussing on the meanness, solitude and quiet desperation of ordinary people, but by doing so they ultimately offer moments of redemption and humanity which put them into the same rank as the later portraits of Rembrandt. These are films to return to again and again. If you let them they will get under your skin and allow you to see the world with a "Kieslowskian eye", not necessarily a seductive or beautiful vision, but one which has a richenss beyond virtually any western art (not simply cinema)of the last twenty to thirty years. In the long run it is with these films that the greatness of the director will come to be understood, rather than on the more self-conscious works which gained him a wider audience in the west.
Essential if you want to understand the state of humanity in late twentieth century Europe
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally Absorbing, 16 May 2006
By 
Mr. S. J. Robson "sleepytimegorillaboy" (Truro, Cornwall, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
I finished watching the last one last night and I never wanted it to end.

First lets get the one downside out of the way: The audio quality has a lot to answer for! It's not terrible but for me (a sound engineer) it really made me question if the company that dealt with the DVD conversion really considered the importance of this collection. But don't let me put you off because of the audio quality, at the end of the day it really isn't that bad and it sort of adds to the time it was created.

Now on to the good side, or sides I should say: I could pick any one part of these 10 stories and find incredible acting, totally original camera work and an inspirational story told in a wonderfully natural fashion.

When I first got the collection I slipped the first one one purely out of interest and I can honestly say I have never to my memory been so captivated by the first 10 minutes of a film.

The music, the intrigue, the script and the most convincing child actor I think I've ever seen.

Even the 2 parts I consider to be not so good you could pull to pieces and discover so much.

I really could type forever on this masterpiece of a collection but instead I'll leave the space below for all of you to put your comments in.

Krzysztof set a standard in 1988 and that standard is far far out of reach to many of the modern day directors (dare I say it!)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best half of Dekalog, 27 Jun 2008
By 
Ian Shine (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
Kieslowski's masterful reworking of the 10 commandments reached it's highest momenets in its second half. While the first 5 are no mean achivement, in 6-10 we see a lot more variation: from the version of 'A Short Film About Love' (episode 6) to the prototype 'Three Colours White' (episode 9), and the stamp collectors' intrigue of the final episode, Kieslowski moves away from the largely downbeat tone of 1-5 to show much more cinematic prowess, in terms of lighting, camera movement and plot. This, for me, made it much more rewarding and interesting.
His takes on the commandments are always well-weighted, taking a good line between obvious interpretations and straying too far away from the theme. The episode about the holocaust (8) stands out as the boldest and most original episodes of the whole series, and certainly stands up as one of the best fictional representations of the meaning of the holocaust and the torment it caused and still causes Jews.
Dekalog is simply unmissable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kieslowski's Masterpiece, 10 April 2011
This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
This is a truly masterpiece, movies open for many interpretations.
I want to point out, that this version of DVD has subtitles bond
with a movie (you can't turn off English subtitles). Sound is OK.

WAZNA uwaga dla kupujacych z Polski:
w tej wersji DVD nie mozna wylaczyc' angielskich napisow, "zaszyte"
na stale. Dzwiek polski, jest OK.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 18 May 2014
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This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
Ultra fast shipment; excellent condition. All movies are great with English subtitles. No problem with understanding it; amazing Kieslowski's movies!
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1.0 out of 5 stars Not the original version!!!, 17 May 2014
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This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
They took away the original credits with Zbigniew Preisner's wonderful music and placed a ridiculous quality images with some other music.
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5.0 out of 5 stars (Arguably) Even Better Than Part 1, 21 Mar 2014
By 
Keith M - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
The second part of Krzysztof Kieslowski's masterful set of 'made for TV' (though entirely cinematic) hour-long dramas (loosely based on the Ten Commandments), for me, probably just about surpasses episodes 1 to 5. Once again, one is struck by the man's near-unique ability to translate for the screen (big or small) a treatment of what are essentially relatively mundane (albeit deadly serious) human issues, by blending engaging narrative, often brilliantly humanistic acting and a stunning eye for cinematic detail. What results is a remarkable film-making achievement, showing the man's versatility, with traces of the realism of a Loach, the measured suspense of a Hitchcock and the subtle idiosyncrasy of a Haneke. And, as Kieslowski himself notes, although his stories are inextricably linked to the mood existing in 1980s Poland, they also work on a more universal, human level (they're 'apolitical' in his words).

As for part 1, all five episodes here have their (often considerable) merits. For me , I found episode Seven's tale of a rebellious daughter and 'single mother' and her attempts to prise her young daughter away from her own mother, though at times emotionally powerful, probably the least effective (and most conventional?) of the stories here. Aside from this, though, I don't think Kieslowski puts a foot wrong here, whether it be Six's tale (remade as A Short Film About Love) of a superb Olaf Lubaszenko's post-office worker and voyeur, Tomek and his doomed love for Grazyna Szapolowska's promiscuous, analytical (but eventually devastated) Magda - real touches of Hitchcock's Rear Window here - Eight's beautifully subtle tale of war-time (Jewish) guilt and abandonment (flavours here of the psychic touches present in The Double Life Of Veronique), or Nine's brilliant examination of spiritual vs. physical love between Piotr Machalica's infertile surgeon, Roman, and his 'estranged' wife, Ewa Blaszczyk's Hanka, with its palpably suspense-filled denouement (which again would be worthy of Hitchcock). And then to conclude his superb film-cycle Kieslowski gives us, in Ten, what is (arguably) the out-and-out most 'entertaining' of all the episodes, a foretaste of his later Three Colours White, by setting up (the stars of the later film) Jerzy Stuhr's Jerzy and brother Zbigniew Zamachowski's heavy metal band (City Death!) singer, Artur, in a brilliantly comic tale as siblings whose surprise inheritance from their recently deceased, reclusive father is his 'priceless' stamp collection, thereby setting in train a (frequently hilarious) tale of intrigue, farce, deceit and 'brotherly love'.

Along the way Kieslowski provides his 'linking themes' and, indeed, actors from other episodes, as well as his trademark, idiosyncratic motifs - here which include an 'unlevelable' picture frame, a contortionist and a faulty car glove compartment.

For anyone with a serious interest in cinema (or, indeed, simply drama) Kieslowski's Dekalog is essential viewing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Dekalog and Decalogue, 9 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] (DVD)
This and the companion DVD on parts 1-5 is an example of the wonderful direction from the Director better known for the Three Colours films and La Double Vie de Veronique. These are simply outstanding
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Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD]
Dekalog: Parts 6-10 [DVD] by Krzysztof Kieslowski (DVD - 2002)
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