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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top of the list of Caravan albums
There was a burgeoning musical scene in Canterbury in the psychedelic era of the later sixties, much of which stemmed from a band called the Wilde Flowers. Groups to emerge from this original nucleus included Gong, Soft Machine, Kevin Ayers and the Whole World, Hatfield and the North and of course Caravan, now based in nearby Whitstable, who evolved out of the remaining...
Published on 3 Jan. 2005 by Lozarithm

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Caravan - for completists only
It has the rather unimaginative format of all the tracks from the album in mono .... then all the same tracks again in stereo which seems plain silly to me: as if they were trying to fool us that there are more tracks than there really are. Who wants to listen to music in mono? Well, I don't. Having said that, I tend to stick it on when I'm working and just let it chunter...
Published 18 months ago by jonathan william chaplin


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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top of the list of Caravan albums, 3 Jan. 2005
By 
Lozarithm (Wilts, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
There was a burgeoning musical scene in Canterbury in the psychedelic era of the later sixties, much of which stemmed from a band called the Wilde Flowers. Groups to emerge from this original nucleus included Gong, Soft Machine, Kevin Ayers and the Whole World, Hatfield and the North and of course Caravan, now based in nearby Whitstable, who evolved out of the remaining members of Wilde Flowers during 1967 when they decided not to be a soul band anymore. They were signed to Verve Records in 1968 with a line-up comprising singer and principal writer Pye Hastings, the brothers Richard and David Sinclair and Richard Coughlan.
Their first album, Caravan, was released in October 1968, with the first two tracks, A Place Of My Own and Ride, extracted as a single the following January. It was in some ways a groundbreaking album that captured the whimsical and exploratory moods of the times with a sound that built on the changing styles of the contemporary underground and took them further.

Pye's brother Jimmy played on the dreamily evocative Love Song With Flute, never having heard the song and recording the flute solo on the first take. The following song, the stage favourite Cecil Rons (a disguised Cecil Rhodes?) is in contrast a rowdy powerful piece with a yelled chorus. Guitar and bass are swapped over on two songs so that Richard Sinclair can take over on lead vocal for his songs Grandma's Lawn and Policeman. The closing track was a complex nine-minute piece inspired in part by a melody written in Wilde Flowers days by then member Brian Hopper. Where But For Caravan Would I? was the precursor of the direction Caravan would take on future albums, alongside their other strengths.
On this edition both mono and stereo mixes of the album are included, and as a bonus track, the single version of 1970's Hello Hello, recorded for Decca as Verve/MGM had folded by this time, rounds off the CD
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars First trip, 7 July 2007
By 
D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
With its echoing organ backgrounds, Caravan's debut album is easily dated to the late 1960s. With only one long track, it has a different slant to everything the band subsequently did, though the gentle, English-accented
vocals are easily identifible. 'A Place Of My Own' is a straightforward, instantly memorable song and 'Ride' with its funny, trotting rhythm is both memorable and more indicative of the band's ingenuity. 'Love Song With Flute' is another beauty, but, while there are no bad tracks on the album, there are moments of blandness. 'Policeman' and 'Magic Man' are not quite as impressive and the first three minutes of their epic 'Where But For Caravan Would I?' are unremarkable. Nevertheless, this is a very good album, worth investigating after 'If I Could Do It All Over, etc' and 'In The Land Of Grey And Pink'. (They didn't like short titles, did they?)
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding debut, 16 Jun. 2008
This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
With their 1968 debut album, Caravan set their own high benchmark for musicianship and creative endeavour, if not for subsequent commercial success. These are wonderful Hammond organ dominated songs sets, with the distinctive voice of Pye Hastings to the fore, superbly supported by Richard Sinclair's wonderfully 'English' vocals. Dave Sinclair's organ dominates the overall sound, but his cousin's tasteful bass, Hastings' precise rhythm guitar and Richard Coughlan's excellent drumming in occasionally challenging time signatures create a wonderful wall of sound with plenty of light and shade. Jimmy Hasting's outstanding flute playing graces "Love song". "Place of my own", "Ride", "Magic Man", and "Cecil Rons" are very evocative of Canterbury's own interpretation of psychedaelia. The album is fitting concluded with the extended piece "Where but for caravan would I?" which pointed the way to extended pieces such as "For Richard" and "Nine feet under" on subsequent albums. Whether you listen in mono or stereo, it is simply a brilliant album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid debut album; better still to come, 31 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
Solid debut album from one of the leading lights of the 'Canterbury Scene' of the late 1960s/early 1970s. The majority of the material here is written by the mainstay of the band, guitarist/vocalist Pye Hastings, and the potential shown here was more fully revealed in 1970 with the release of the splendid 'If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You' and perfected on 2 gorgeous LPs, namely 1971's 'In The Land Of Grey And Pink' and 1973's 'For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night'. 'Caravan' is definitely worth checking out but, personally, I would buy the material from the period 1970-1973 first before I invested here.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great music, 22 Aug. 2011
By 
A. Csete "Chets" (RAF) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
I bought this album despite mixed reviews because I like the other Caravan albums I own. If you like the rest of their stuff like Land of Grey and Pink, you'll enjoy this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Caravan cd, 23 May 2009
By 
S. E. Lindsay - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
Caravan's 1968 debut with both mono and stereo mixes. This cd has a melodic yet proggy sound, highlighted by the organ that seeps in from the very first track. "Place of my own" and "Magic man" are real gems of the psychedelic era. "Love song with flute" has a really dreamy summery feel, while "Cecil Rons" flashes from anger to happiness with amazing ease. A very British sounding album with hints of the progressive rock sound that would come to fruition in the early 1970's. The single "Hello hello" is also featured here and fits nicely with the album. Complete with comprehensive liner notes, this is an excellent purchase for fans of the psychedelic/prog rock sound.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Caravan takes you on a journey, 27 Aug. 2012
By 
Mr. John Smith (Aberdeen, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
Having always loved Caravan's sound with the Land of the Grey and Pink being one of my all time favourite albums I had never heard this earlier work. It is not quite as polished and epic as LGP but you can hear on some of the tracks the basis of Caravan's sound and what would be the foundation of LGP. By the second listening I found myself relaxing into it and after a few more plays experiencing the familiar enjoyment of their later work. Definitely worth adding to any collection if you like or have liked the Canterbury sound. Also good for new comers to the sound but I would advise starting with the Land of the Grey and Pink. But at this price must be one of the best value for money trips back to a great musical period.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Album but Wrong Mp3, 2 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
This is a good first album from Caravan; perhaps not a classic like Grey and Pink or Girls That Grow Plump... But an essential purchase for the Caravan fan nonetheless.

But beware! The associated mp3 album is a completely different album by a completely different band altogether. I've received the mp3 via Cloud Player as I purchase the CD some time ago (it isn't showing AutoRip but I've received this 'alternative' nonetheless).

I think it's because of this mistake that two reviewers have awarded this album only one star; they've received the wrong album so I have sympathy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Caravan - hidden secret, 3 July 2014
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
This is a superb album. Totally under-rated and as good as Pink Floyd psychedelic era, early Genesis, the Doors, Satanic Majesties. or Seargeant Pepper (OK maybe not quite as good). Grandma's lawn is a classic psychedelic track with mind bending percussion and imaginative lyrics which I want to re-write as poetry. The keyboardist works some insane patterns. Mr Policeman - excellent. This is just waiting to be re-discovered. This is genuinely freaky and evocative of that particular time - 1968.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Caravan CD, 15 Dec. 2013
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This review is from: Caravan (Audio CD)
CD has both mono and stereo versions of the same Album. They don't appear remarkably different. At least in the car you get to hear the Album twice on a long journey! Personally, I don't think this is their best work but it has some good moments. Needs to be played loud on good speakers to get the full effect of some of the quiet, weird material. As ever goods arrived promptly in plain packaging. Thanks.
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