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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Improves the film and you get loads of extras!
Well, I can admit to not being the biggest fan of this film, but I've seen it enough times to realise its charm, its sci-fi qualities, its epic feel and so on. But has the Motion-less Picture been improved with this extensive reworking? Well, at the moment its the only Trek film DVD I own...
Well, the DVD certainly offers value for money - three documentaries looking...
Published on 7 May 2002 by Mr. AB Taylor

versus
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ***WARNING*** NOT the Director's Edition!!!
Just wanted to grab everyone's attention with a low review - I received the BLU RAY edition of STTMP today, and it DOESN'T appear to be the much improved Director's Cut that was re-released a couple of years back!

Most of the reviews on this page are of the DVD edition which is indeed the new version, but they're NOT of the BLU RAY! Because I'm a total fan I'll...
Published on 22 Mar. 2010 by Johnny143


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Improves the film and you get loads of extras!, 7 May 2002
By 
Mr. AB Taylor (Leek, Staffordshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition [DVD] (DVD)
Well, I can admit to not being the biggest fan of this film, but I've seen it enough times to realise its charm, its sci-fi qualities, its epic feel and so on. But has the Motion-less Picture been improved with this extensive reworking? Well, at the moment its the only Trek film DVD I own...
Well, the DVD certainly offers value for money - three documentaries looking at Star Trek: Phase II's development into a film (I didn't know that Paramount changed their minds about whether to have a Trek series or film four times!! :)), plus two commentaries - one text by Mike Okuda, offering loads of trivia-tidbits, and another group one by Robert Wise (director), Douglas Trumball (special photographic effects director), John Dykstra (special photographic effects supervisor), Jerry Goldsmith (composer) and Stephen Collins (Commander Decker). Oh, and the film itself in its reworked glory. :)
Well, the cut of the film has changed the early pace - it runs a little faster now, despite the running time being a few minutes longer than originally! The shot of San Francisco when Kirk lands in his shuttle is amazing. We actually get to see what V'Ger looks like now (and where it may look to advanced and weird, it was actually suggested in the original storyboards in 1979.) New SFX also stop quiet scenes from becoming dull now - and the horrible SFX they had when V'Ger dissolves the Klingon vessels at the start has, thankfully, changed. :)
Well, I could go on forever, but what has happened is that Rob Wise has made subtle changes that have improved the film's quality here and there. Along with all the extra features mentioned, this is certainly worth the money and will have fans crying out for more Star Trek (insert film name) Director's Edition DVDs in the future.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A new version of a classic science fiction film., 8 Mar. 2002
By 
Colin Neal (Reading, Berkshire. England United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition [DVD] (DVD)
When Academy Award winning director Robert Wise released the first Star Trek film back in 1979 he, like George Lucas, wasn't content with the final cut or special effects, which were imperfect mainly due to timing constraints. 22 years later and Wise has reworked the film in every respect.
There are a few versions of Star Trek the motion picture, but this isn't the culmination of all the footage available combined into one long version. In fact, in total it's only 5 minutes longer than the original theatrical version. The (5) scenes that are taken out / deleted from the original version are on the second disc thankfully plus 11 scenes missing from all previous versions. It's more replacement and enhancement. For example, Spock's ceremony on Vulcan, the visuals of the landscape are brand new (huge statues everywhere). New special effects from Foundation Imaging are also present, including a new computer generated Enterprise plus other sequences have been tweaked.
It's digitally remastered, the sound mix is new, there are new special effects, new scenes (and trimmed old scenes). In short, it's 70% of the original movie.
However, it's not perfect, it feels very different. Some of the re-editing has really helped it. There were 2 really dodgy scenes involving Ilya and Decker in the original where he sets a new course after the wormhole and she crassly responds with "Science officer's computation's confirmed sir" then they both smile at each other. While this line has been removed, the smile is inserted earlier in the film when the ship is leaving the solar system. A good decision. Secondly, Chekov's hand injury is nicely underscored with some music. I feel that too many of the scenes have been shortened or deleted. While Wise has corrected the pacing in the earlier part of the film, it seems like everything is resolved too quickly.
The sound also loses some atmosphere. The restoration team have obviously thought "we can put a new sound effect in here, here and here" - it's really over the top especially when you hear computer noises from the Enterprise-D (Next Generation) in there. While the sound mix of music and effects are impressive the vocals are as muffled and quiet as they always were. As for the picture quality, it's not been cleaned up at all.
Special Visual effects are neatly inserted, a couple of shots of the Enterprise here and there but nowhere near as many as I was expecting. The new scene with V'Ger launching orbiting devices looks excellent.
As for the film itself, it's not the best Star Trek film if you compare to the Wrath of Khan or First Contact but it's huge in scope; although slow and cerebral it's still a feast for the senses after all these years. The only problem is that this isn't the "right" director's cut. It's half the way there, better pacing, better editing but there's too much missing. You can't help wondering that the scenes that were removed could have been inserted in a clever way with new effects to improve the movie further.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 5 STAR Trek, 4 Jan. 2001
By A Customer
Come aboard the fully revamped Starship Enterprise along with it's classic crew form the much loved TV series. This movie looks and feels fantastic with its all new fresher sounds, its sharper photography and its "no strings attatched" effects. Definately the best film of the lot with a great plot, great cast and great acting. I saw this film at the movies when it first came out in 1979 at the age of 8. I will never forget how stunned I was at how much everything just looked so cool in its modernised presentation. It was my favourite then, and still is . Will never get bored of this gem. Still watching to this day! Forget the rest, pick this one, THE BEST!!!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A New Lease of Life, 25 Aug. 2011
I actually do not know how many times I have watched Star Trek the Motion Picture. I've watched it on television, on VHS and on DVD. I have a certain fondness for it, a feel-good factor that I can't quite explain. Its shortcomings are well-known and discussed at length elsewhere, so I won't bore anyone with those.

However, what I *do* feel the need to point out is that the movie looks fantastic on Blu-ray. I had watched the first 30 mins of the Director's Edition DVD upscaled on my Blu-ray player, and it was... satisfactory. Nothing spectacular. I've been sitting on the fence on the perennial "upscaled DVD vs Blu-ray" discussion... but having watched the Blu version of this movie, I've decided where my loyalties lie.

The first shot of the Klingon ships approaching V'Ger starts slowly (no difference there then), but as they get closer to the viewer, the level of detail revealed now is actually astonishing. And this is true throughout the movie. I noticed so many details I hadn't paid attention to before (and I've seen this film a lot!). Although certain scenes are soft (and they seem to have been intentionally filmed that way, according to the commentary), most scenes are crisp and clear... darks are dark and lights are bright. Colours (when they appear!) pop off the screen. It's just a pity there aren't more of them, as the colour palette of TMP is decidedly muted.

Enterprise herself looks extraordinary... I found myself actually fascinated by the long beauty-pass this time, noticing all the details (minor and major) of the scene. I think this was the same throughout many other parts of the movie - the long lingering shots and never-ending visions of V'Ger took on an added dimension (almost literally) and a new level of fascination. The V'Ger clouds and internals pop off the screen - they are vivid, alive, interesting for the first time.

One down side is that sometimes *too much* detail is visible. The space dock looks like an Airfix kit in some close-up shots. The wire leading to the battery powering the Ilia-probe's red sensor is visible on the actor's throat. Matte lines are more obvious around the models. However, none of this is that distracting, and is all true to the source material.

The score for TMP is striking and unusual. In addition to the now-familiar "Next Generation" theme, there are a lot of bass-guitar and percussion sounds punctuating the soundtrack. Which is good, considering the characters themselves have very little to say, and when they do, it's quite erudite and perfunctory. The music and visuals are left to carry much of the movie. The sound does not disappoint either. Although the music often over-saturates the scene, and overpowers the dialogue, it does its job well. When thinking of TMP the music is one of the items that stands out most for me. The audio transfer on the Blu is as solid and clear as the visual transfer.

As other reviewers have pointed out, it's a shame that this transfer is not based on the (in my opinion) superior Director's Edition. That may appear sometime in the future. However, in the meantime, the original version of the movie is given a much-needed new lease of life.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Why is any object we don't understand always called 'a thing'?", 25 Oct. 2010
By 
@GeekZilla9000 "I am completely operational a... (Doncaster, Yorkshire, UK.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
A gigantic cosmic cloud headed towards Earth is destroying everything in its path, reflecting all attempts to scan it and refusing any attempts at communication. Admiral Kirk exercises his authority and seizes control over the newly refurbished Enterprise in order to warp over to the cloud and stop it before it destroys his home planet.

This isn't a film crammed full of action scenes and references to the TV series - for a start, it's very slow-paced. It takes nearly twenty minutes for Kirk to travel to the enterprise, and once the adventure starts there are prolonged scenes where we are left to marvel at the psychedelic cosmic cloud. The film has received much criticism for sloppy editing, but I personally believe that the 'extended' feel of the film adds to a more epic atmosphere. There's a sense that everything might not be alright, a fear that the crew may not fully succeed in their task.

This isn't a camp jolly around the universe with phaser guns and spandex jumpsuits. There are tense bridge politics as the overthrown Captain Decker feels cast aside at the whim of an Admiral who can't let go of the ship he once commanded. Once under Kirk's control the ship witnesses the death of two crew who try to beam onboard - it's a harrowing incident, not the light-hearted fun you're used to, there are no Tribbles falling out of overhead compartments here.

This is Star Trek but not as we know it - this is Star Trek with added peril. It is somehow more mature and when the crew finally get to the craft in the middle of the cloud you appreciate that this is great science fiction. Chances are you've already seen the film, but if not then the revelation behind the clouds origin is brilliant in both its massive scope and simplicity. The desire for the powerful entity to find it's creator hints at a deep philosophical view at what God is, and what it means to those who believe. An exploration summed up perfectly by Decker in a deleted scene when him and McCoy discuss religion and conclude that "We all create God in our own image".

This Blu-Ray release isn't the best title to showcase Hi-Def, the source material is often a bit fuzzy and there are plenty of soft focus shots (something the film has in common with the original TV series) - but having watched this a few times many years ago on VHS, this is probably the best the film has ever looked. The soundtrack is incredible and Jerry Goldsmith's score is full of energy, it often drowns out the speech but that just encourages you to crank up the volume and immerse yourself in the orchestral experience. Notable bonuses include the 'Library computer' - a fairly extensive pop-up glossary which can be accessed while you watch to film to view referenced information on everything from airlocks to wormholes as they appear in the movie. There's also a fascinating documentary called 'The longest trek' which documents the origins of the film and the politics which made the project so difficult. The film was essentially created on the back of the success of Star Wars and was a re-drafted version of a planned new Star Trek TV series. There are also some deleted scenes, and a documentary about the history of V'Ger which you ought not to watch if this is the first time you've seen the film as it contains a major plot spoiler.

In a nutshell: When you watch this you can see why some feel that it isn't true to the original TV series and a lot of people simply feel that the film drags on. If this wasn't a Star Trek film then this would be lauded as a Sci-Fi masterpiece of the same ilk as 2001 and Solaris. For all its weaknesses, the film has far greater strengths. It brings to the screen an ambitious, dark, and intelligent space adventure which manages also to have heart without being tacky.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Special Edition Finishes The Job, 27 May 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition [DVD] (DVD)
This much (and unfairly in my opinion) maligned first cinema outing of the Star Trek franchise has dotted the eyes and crossed the t's on a film that was rushed out to the theatres before it was truly ready.
This release contains three documentaries. One about the movie, another about the special edition and one about the aborted TV show, "Star Trek: Phase II". Their cheap, but quite insightful as is the commentary.
As for the film itself, the effects have been cleaned up nicely without Lucasizing the film.
Some of the scenes in the 1983 version have been removed so it runs about the same length as the original without the appalling slashes.
The new V'ger and Vulcan scenes are based, largely, on the original story boards which they never had time to do in 1979 and all the new affects are done by only using technology that was available in 1979 with the exception of some stick figure CGI's.
Completists still have the original undoctored and deleted scenes on the second disk.
The result is a much more polished film that doesn't look like its been completely made over.
If any DVD is worth twenty odd quid then this one is.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful, high quality, Science Fiction, 24 Mar. 2002
By A Customer
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This review is from: Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition [DVD] (DVD)
When this film came out in 1979, it was maligned because it was expensive and slow ( though everyone seems to conveniently forget that the start-up and development costs for Star Trek Phase II were incorporated in this budget). Many Trekkers seemed to think that this would be a 'Star Wars' rip off with Kirk wanting to blow up a few Klingon cruisers, Spock telling him that this would not be logical and McCoy telling Spock to stop hassling Kirk! This film showed a lot more guts with an intellectually sophisticated and thoughtful plot - this film is still clearly the closest a Trek movie has come to Gene Roddenberry's view of the future, and the only classic cast film that was a true 'motion picture'. This re-issue has really turned what was in effect a rough cut of an interesting movie into a fully polished science fiction film ( please note, not a Star Trek film), with 2001 style philosophical overtones - albeit ( unlike 2001) it tries to answer them.
The re-editing has really tightened the movie- and the sound effects are excellent though still subtle- the music still seems to come close to overpowering them at times ( though since this score is pure brilliance, who cares??), and some of the fx scenes that could have done with a digital clean up seem to have been missed. The new fx however serve the film very well - it might have been fun to have seen more shots of a full scale Vejur though - the shots that were presented really made an impact.
As I said earlier, Jerry Goldsmith's music is outstanding - there are even some more cues. The story is now more exciting and the film's climax more effective. The commentary by the fx crew and Mr Wise is interesting and informative and some of the comments made by Mr Trumbull in the closing credits about the current state of most fx driven movies were spot on.
So, I recommend this movie as an excellent science fiction film. The only other Star Trek films that reach beyond the campiness of their TV origins are Star Trek First Contact and Star Trek VI ( the darkest and most dramatic adventures of the series). However neither of them quite catch the scope and epic feel of this fantastic movie
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ***WARNING*** NOT the Director's Edition!!!, 22 Mar. 2010
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Just wanted to grab everyone's attention with a low review - I received the BLU RAY edition of STTMP today, and it DOESN'T appear to be the much improved Director's Cut that was re-released a couple of years back!

Most of the reviews on this page are of the DVD edition which is indeed the new version, but they're NOT of the BLU RAY! Because I'm a total fan I'll gladly own both, but still I feel quite cheated.

I must say though that the BLU RAY does look and sound absolutely superb, even though it is the original cut of the film. Colour depth, contrast, and detail really are amazing for a film 30+ years old (it does highlight how creaky some the effects shots are looking though - which is one of the reasons why the whole thing was given a make-over and re-released as the Director's Edition).

I've scoured the extras and there doesn't seem to be any branching option available where either edition can be played - if anybody can correct me, please do and I'll happily withdraw this review!

Based on the above, this current ORIGINAL release BLU RAY rates **1/2 instead of the potential ***** it could have been!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars V'ge beyond the stars, 24 May 2013
They really don't make them like this any more. Couldn't. Imagine if Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman had walked into the Paramount offices and slammed THIS script on the table: A slow, solemn, philosophically dense adventure into a cloud of gas, with barely an action scene in sight and no conventional enemy.

Almost a decade previously, Robert Wise directed The Andromeda Strain, the quintessential "hard" sci-fi of the 1970s, where the emphasis was on the science, and the action took place on computer readouts. And two decades before that he made The Day the Earth Stood Still, a 1950s monster movie without a monster, standing out at the time for its seriousness.

Star Trek The Motion Picture could be seen as Wise's homage to 2001: A Space Odyssey. There are lengthy sequences (I'm talking 10 minutes at a time) basically constituted of extended fly-bys of Douglas Trumbull's still-extraordinary special effects. Throughout, there's an admirable dedication to awe, something often missing from modern sci-fi, where a black hole is no more than a flying mouth and spacetime is traversed in a shrug.

If only there'd been equivalent care shown to the characters. Unfortunately, they are reduced to mere tour guides on this fantastic adventure, showing us when to gaze agape in wonderment, and verbalising what is frankly apparent from the images. The ending is like the birth of the Starchild with a director's commentary rambling over the top.

Kirk (William Shatner, subtle in portraying the humility of his out-of-practice captain) and Spock (the monolithic Leonard Nimoy) are present, and the friendship is as tender and fraught as ever - but they have only one really good scene together. Instead, the focus is on the star-cross'd relationship between the Deltan Ilia (a chilling Persis Khambatta) and acting-captain Decker (Stephen Collins), which is sadly rather drab and unconvincing.

The Motion Picture may not be the finest film in the original Star Trek series, but it's certainly the most distinctive and the strangest - a far, far cry from Star Trek IV's terrestrial comedy. What it lacks in humour and emotional resonance, The Motion Picture makes up for with its grand scope and vision, sometimes sparking the senses and stirring the imagination.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There's klingon's on the starboard bow., 24 Jan. 2012
By 
Mr. G. Robinson "garyrobinson15" (North Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition [DVD] (DVD)
The first of the Star Trek films is still arguably the best, but only just.

Described by some cruel critics, on it's release as "The Moooooootion Picture" because of it's undeniably slow and in some scenes ponderous pace, Captain Kirk and his crews first foray onto the big screen was fraught with problems from the start, a very tight shooting schedule, an over reliance on complicated and lengthy special effects shots, two crews working independently of each other, only having a partially written script, and the overexpectations of the studio and millions of highly dedicated fans worldwide. All this and more was placed on the shoulders of respected and talented director Robert Wise, who may not have fully understood the tempest he had taken on. When Star Wars became a world wide hit in 1977, Paramount greenlight Star Trek 1 (ST1) and sold the movie to movie houses all over the USA with a fixed release date. This meant the filmmakers were under pressure from day one.

ST1, in it's present form, would not be made today, the script would have chunks ripped out of it and the slower sections removed almost entirely. Luckily it's not being made today, it was made 33 years ago, before films were marketed in the main at 14 year olds with short attention spans more used to watching video games. This means the story actually exists and makes sense. Written by Alan Dean Foster it has intelligence and substance. All the main characters from the TV series returned and there is enough humour and banter between the main characters to keep Star Trek purists happy, along with quite spectacular special effects and high production values for those not very familiar with the original low budget, but brilliantly written series made over 10 years before. The following year the special effects team worked on Blade Runner I understand. The sets are beautifully designed and substantial, the whole production was a labour of love for the then young producer Jeffrey Katzenburger.

Yes, the special effects have been tweeked and scenes extended a little, the soundtrack changed a little, but for the most part the changes make very little differnce to the overall film, in fact if you haven't watched the original you may not notice the differences at all, the brief was to make the changes seamless and not to be too noticeable. I for one, however, can watch either edition (Theatrical release or Directors cut) without any real preference. The whole idea of revisiting old movies and making them "better" troubles me slightly, Some of the effects shots in Citizen Kane and the original War of the Worlds are pretty ropey, but they have not been "bettered". Perhaps filmakers should not been given money to "fix" films or recut them just so they can be sold to us again. I can't really see any artistry in these changes, it's mearly cosmetic and of no real worth. And don't get me started on Colorization.

Don't listen to the critics, ST1, in it's old or new form, is a fabulous film for Trekkies and non Trekkies alike.

The DVD extras are fabulous or just OK depending on wether you're a fan or not.
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