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59 of 63 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars takes liberties, but involving and well played
Reviews of this film have been very varied, from very positive to the exact opposite. It is true that it makes explicit what is not even implied in Jane Austen's book about the way in which Sir Thomas makes his wealth - it's the slave trade. Having said that, historical fact makes this at least a possibility, and even if Sir Thomas were not directly involved, the...
Published on 20 Feb. 2007 by hillbank68

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars VERY loosely based on Mansfield Park
This is a lovely film, but the character of Fanny is the creation of someone other than Jane Austen. In this film, her younger sister Susan says of her: "Your tongue is sharper than a guillotine", and Lord Bertram compels her to read the society page about Maria's elopement saying: "You have such a strong, clear voice." That, if you have ever read the book, should tell...
Published on 4 Oct. 2012 by Mary Kruger


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13 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, interpreted adaption, 4 Nov. 2006
By 
This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
It is true that the adaption is not truthful to the novel down to every last inch, but every adaption means that editing and interpretation must take place. Rozema's Mansfield Park is a poignant reminder that the hay day of elegance rested on systematic brutality.

Of course, if one expects the film to be the novel on screen, it is very likely that one will be dissapointed. This is an interpreted adaption that draws on both Austens personal letters as well as, I would suggest, contemporary critical accounts of the novel.

But still, it is an exhilarating film. The superb cast, the beautiful setting, the grotesque meal sequence in the Price kitchen, the disturbing - genuinly appaling - drawings of Tom's, the slave ship, ..I could go on.. The film has surpringsingly many levels, and I do willingly recommend it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 30 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
Love it ♡
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The worst adaptation of any Austen book, 12 Dec. 2010
This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
The most I can say for this film is that it's so bad that I ended up laughing at it instead of being annoyed.

The character of Fanny Price bears no resemblance to the book whatsoever, I would not like to compare her with Miss Crawford too closely, and there are several scenes that are simply made up... and perhaps not offensive by today's standards, but certainly do not convey a sense of the regency that we have come to expect in Jane Austen's work.

I'm sure as a film it does well enough but for anyone who likes the book, it is most definitely the worst adaptation that has been made.

The case notes even had a message from the makers of this film, who had the cheek to say that it is the film of the book Jane Austen would have liked to have written, had she been able to!
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It could have been bad but it wasn't!!!, 27 July 2009
By 
This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
Mansfield Park is an absolutely delightful movie, well worth a watch especially if you are a fan of Jane Austen, as this film is loosely based upon Jane Austen's book as well as her letters and journals.

The story is charming and unlike the more recent 2007 version is very easy to follow, even if you like me have never read the novel. Fanny Price (Frances O'Connor) as a child is sent by her poverty-stricken family to live with her wealthy cousins: the Bartons. It is there that Fanny grows into an independent and strong-minded woman: an independence that often leads her into trouble with her elders, as she struggles to find her place in the precarious society of the time, as well as struggling to deal with her growing feelings for her cousin, Edmund. With the arrival of new neighbours in the form of the daring Mary Crawford and her rakish brother Henry, things look set to change but whether for the better is another question as Henry takes an interest in Fanny, while Mary takes an interest in Fanny's timid cousin, Edmund.

The script is witty and sharp, at all times keeping the audience well-engaged, with a good balance of clever repartee and romantic moments. It has a few little one-liners that will stick in your mind afterwards, for example at one point a cocky Mary Crawford says, "selfishness must always be forgiven for there is no cure". It is little moments like this that make this movie extra-special.

The actors are perfect. Frances O'Connor's portrayal of Fanny Price is flawless. One can at all times empathise with her and her struggle to survive in what is ultimately a man's world. As the love interest Lee-Miller is appropriately timid but at the same time endearing. There are some really beautiful moments that will remain in your head afterwards for example the carriage scene and the sick-bed. Pure magic that will have you smiling. Even Fanny's voice-overs didn't get on my nerves and I am usually not a fan of voice-overs.

Secondary features are equally wonderful. The locations are beautiful, the music enchanting and the costumes well thought-out.

To conclude I would highly recommend Mansfield Park to people of all ages. Obviously fans of period drama will love this but I believe that this movie will even appeal to people not overly fond of this genre of movie. As I have not read the novel I cannot comment on how faithful this adaptation is but regardless it is still a beautiful and charming movie, well worth a purchase.
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10 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly brilliant, 15 Feb. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
I normally loathe period drama - the books, the adaptations and only watched this the first time cos I love Jonny Lee Miller. I have to say I was completely shocked at how much I was absorbed into the story, and I now have the book as well. A truly brilliant film - even if this kind of thing doesn't normally appeal!
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11 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great adaptation, 19 Mar. 2007
This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
This is clearly to a completely failthful adaptation of Austen but if you've just seen the new Billie Piper version, which misses out most of the layers of story and is totally two dimesioal then this seems like a slavish following of the text. This version is much loved in my houshold
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11 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A heartfelt film!, 10 Aug. 2006
By 
T. Duggan-rees "tzone" (tzone) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
I must say having not read the novel I am slightly blind to the films errors. I felt that this was a heartfelt tale of to people very much in love. It has some charming acting and is stunningly shot. Overall it is a great family film and you can watch it over and over!!
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mansfield Park, 14 Sept. 2009
By 
M. N. Smith - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
First class viewing although I still regard the 'Bernard Hepton edition' as tops. The acting cannot be faulted - I just wish it had been longer.
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11 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another tangle of tortured, amorous yearnings, 11 Mar. 2006
By 
Amazon Customer (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
MANSFIELD PARK is the third film adaptation, after PRIDE & PREJUDICE and SENSE & SENSIBILITY, of a Jane Austen novel that I've been entreated to see by female acquaintances. Perhaps they're trying to refine my boorish character. Actually, while I've not read any of the Austen novels (nor do I intend to), I've enjoyed all three screen versions. There's hope for me yet, even at this late date.
This time around, our plucky heroine is Fannie Price, who, at the film's beginning at age 10, is sent by her parents from their flea-infested quayside hovel in Portsmouth to live with a pair of maternal aunts, Lady Bertram (Lindsay Duncan) and Mrs. Norris (Sheila Gish), at MANSFIELD PARK. Lady Bertram is married to the lord of the manor, Sir Thomas Bertram (Harold Pinter), and Mrs. Norris seems to be an integral part of Housekeeping. Fannie is to "better herself" among the family at the Great House, which includes Bertram's sons, Edmund (Jonny Lee Miller) and Tom (James Purefoy) and daughters, Julia (Victoria Hamilton) and Maria (Justine Waddell). Very soon the script jumps forward several years to 1806, and Fannie is now a young woman (played by Frances O'Conner). By this time also, Maria is engaged to a dull but congenial local chap, Mr. Rushworth (Hugh Bonneville).
Fannie is pretty much unimpressed by her residence among the landed gentry, and her wit, which she sometimes addresses to the camera (a nice touch to the film), is sharp. As she says of living at MANSFIELD PARK, "Life seems nothing more than a quick succession of busy nothings." One day, these "busy nothings" turn steamier with the arrival of the Crawfords, a brother/sister act, Henry (Alessandro Nivola) and Mary (Embeth Davidtz), who are there to rent out a nearby cottage. The film's best scene is perhaps when the Crawfords are ushered into the parlor where Fannie and the Bertrams are gathered while Sir Thomas and Tom, Jr. are off on a jolly inspecting the family's plantation in Antigua. One could hear a pin drop as the lens focuses on the faces of Lady Bertram, Mrs. Norris, Julia and Maria as their eyes fasten on the Gorgeous Hunk Henry, and on Mary's as she scrutinizes young Edmund. The look each demonstrates is the same I might show when stumbling across an especially fine piece of steak at the meat counter. Very soon, emotions run high. Maria has the hots for Henry, but he's obsessed with Fannie, who continues in her long standing love of Edmund, who may or may not return the feeling but is momentarily distracted by the admiring flirtations of the alluring Mary. It's the usual Austen Regency soap opera with its attendant crises d'amour.
For me, the considerable appeal of MANSFIELD PARK lies somewhere between that of P&P and S&S, the former having the highest (because of a greater length that allowed for varied and fuller character development). The vulnerable yet strong-willed Price is wonderfully likable, especially when she (both as the 10-year old and the young adult) delivers her asides to the viewing audience with wry humor and a mischievous smile. And, unlike the other two Austen epics mentioned, MANSFIELD PARK has a truly sharp edge revolving around the enslaved Blacks on the Bertrams' Antiguan property. Fannie is cut by this one day when she discovers some eye-opening sketches made by the younger Tom of events back on the plantation. No scene of such intensity was ever part of the cinematic P&P or S&S, and it's startling because it's so unexpected. It's an effective counterpoint to the gentility of Fannie's present environment.
If I have it right, there are one or two more Austen novels on film, plus at least one by Charlotte Brontë, that I'm being pressured to view. How much does a Neanderthal have to endure to evolve into a New Age Sensitive Fella?
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not for true JA fans!, 2 Nov. 2009
By 
Lynne Rapson "bookaholic" (Hampshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] (DVD)
Please do not waste your money or time on this trash. Life is too short to watch such a travesty. Read the book, enjoy the characterisation and story for yourself instead of this producer's rather dark and twisted version which drastically alters the story leaving out some characters completely. No stars at all as far as I am concerned.
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Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000]
Mansfield Park [DVD] [2000] by Patricia Rozema (DVD - 2002)
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