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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Believe What I Believe In
I originally posted the review below on the 2001 release which has been deleted for many a year.

It's nice to see this classic album given a deserved re-release, especially as it's (yet another) two-disc deluxe edition. The album has had a welcome remaster and included unreleased demos and live tracks.

OK, this is the original lineups last album...
Published on 27 Sep 2008 by Coincidence Vs Fate

versus
1 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight pantomine
Love songs or other nonsense for 13 year olds, played by blokes in their early twenties, by the release of this album the novelty effect was already wearing off, many of their student fans had left uni that summer. not least in me demoting buzzcocks was the release in june of joy divisions unknown pleasures, novelty punk/new wave was exposed and something much darker and...
Published on 1 Dec 2011 by casio smith


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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Believe What I Believe In, 27 Sep 2008
By 
Coincidence Vs Fate - See all my reviews
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I originally posted the review below on the 2001 release which has been deleted for many a year.

It's nice to see this classic album given a deserved re-release, especially as it's (yet another) two-disc deluxe edition. The album has had a welcome remaster and included unreleased demos and live tracks.

OK, this is the original lineups last album. Released in September 1979, it shows that the band were heading in a new direction. Though behind the scenes, the band were slowly falling apart, their recorded offerings were still of the highest quality.

Side one is shared between Shelley and Diggle. Pete offers us the catchy "Paradise", the gorgeous "You Say You Don't Love Me" and it's b-side "Raison D'etre". Steve gives us some of his best and strangest material to date, the great "You Know You Can't Help It", complete with dodgy lyrics, "Sitting Round At Home" and the insane "Mad Mad Judy".

This album really comes alive on side two. I've always thought of side two as Pete Shelley's Depression Suite. Pete was obviously starting to go a bit barmy around this time, though his songwriting was going from strength to strength. "I Don't KNow What To Do With My Life" starts the whole proceedings off. Next we get "Money" with it's almost Funky Drummer rhythm. This segues into "Hollow Inside", which if isn't written by a manic depressive then I'll eat my hat! The title track is just, though I don't really mean "just" a list of opposites sung by Shelley. He even goes all Kraftwerk on us at one point with a use of a vocoder, though it's hardly Man Machine, so Ralf and Florian didn't have to worry too much. Next comes the albums Tour De Force, the fantastic "I Believe". A seven minute wonder which includes some of Pete's finest lyrics. His pain clear at the end with a monologue of "there is no love in this world anymore".

Finally, we get the fifty second "Radio Nine", a brief radio transmission where we hear "Everybody's Happy Nowadays" and "Why Can't I Touch It" through the static.

My tip for the day: just don't play it when you're feeling down.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Meta-punk new wave must have!, 4 Aug 2013
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Kgmavroudakis "KGMavroudakis" (Athens, Greece) - See all my reviews
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Excellent classics of (meta)punk music! Very influential to new groups pop/new wave of later periods and of today. It is one that I cannot forget from these years.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NO TENSION HERE JUST GREAT MUSIC, 15 Oct 2013
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This is the third album the band brought out and in my opinion is just as good as the first two.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Fine Collection of Tunes, 6 Feb 2009
I've had this album on CD for a few years now thanks to a well purchased import but I'm glad it's finally received a UK CD release in it's own right. Why did it take so long? Surely one of the UKs finest bands and one of their first phase of albums - why the hold up guys?!

Anyway, I love this to bits. It's got a really nice vibe thoughtout. The production is kinda spacious and a bit mysterious - production on a par to The Clash's Combat Rock like it was recorded in a warehouse in the desert or something but that's where the Clash comparisons end.

I believe Pete provided the vocals to "Hollow Inside" whilst he was on anti-depressants and it certainly seems that way. "Why She's The Girl From The Chainstore" surely another highlight and a frantic Steve Diggle delivers an onslaught ode to a hum-drum female existance lyrically similar to XTC's Battery Brides. Just a stunning delivery. Alongside this, "Mad Mad Judy" is another 1000mph Diggle onslaught of pure brillance - man she must be some mad bitch! - we're also treated to the demo with this release (although it's very rough round the edges). That said "Sitting Round At Home" has Diggle in an almost chilled John Lennon kinda vibe which he manages to control until the chorus where he just can't help himself breaks free into a punk thrash - It's all highly entertaining particularly when Shelley joins him on the dual vocal - the outro has Diggle ranting into the far distance.

File "Strange Thing" next to "Hollow Inside" another of Shelley's ode to Prozac whilst taking a ghost ride (just what were they doing in the studio?!).

We've got brass that possibly should be kept firmly in pocket "What Do You Know" kinda suffers and embarrasingly gives away the age of this album by employing some brass arrangement (was it really necessary? someone's great idea no doubt).

"Running Free" even to this day seems to get a live airing in the set. And why not it's another great Diggle escapism adventure. The arrangement is sublime especially when the Diggle verse Shelley chorus kicks in. It's like a professor has created the greatest pop formula.

"You Say You Don't Love Me" is typical textbook Buzzcocks that matures from "What Do I Get" to ok I've got it but why don't you love me now?! "I Don't Know What To Do With My Life" is of a similar ilk. Shelley frantically uncertain of what the future brings - typical teenage angst portrayed through a 2min pop spectacular with a guitar line so ultimately obvious but so fitting.

A highlight for me is "Raison D'Etre" it's almost synchopated guitar and drums seem to almost stumble ofbeat but it's held together amazingly well. Shelley is almost crooning the lyrics (he's clearly more upbeat here and really enjoying himself). There's a very very tasty piece of guitar which I love to bits - it dances around for a bit then slices right through you in a rage of feedback (turn it up loud kids!).

With the re-release we're treated to "I Am Alone" (originally on Product) another nice pop slab although the chorus seems to spin into hippy territory "All today is beautiful" ?! Saved by some fabulous guitar work and handclaps. Another oddity is the Steve Garvey penned "Run Away From Home" which again is a great song in it's own right although a little unfinished/abandoned sounding which is a great shame. There's a few more oddities included "Somethings Gone Wrong Again" (was this even from this session?) appears sounding very trippy and purely instrumental.

I guess overall it's great songs, timeless fade-outs!, great lyrics all delivered with a razor sharp slice through an abandoned warehouse. I've loved it for years and will continue to love it for many many years to come.
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5.0 out of 5 stars fab, 26 Feb 2014
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buzzcocks what can you say had been told this wasnt available on cd but managed to find it! another in my collection
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5.0 out of 5 stars Buzzcocks slide in to madness !, 24 Jun 2013
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Mr. David J. Garrett "dizzy" (uk, sheffield) - See all my reviews
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less cheery power pop on this, more edge of psychedelic breakdown. And better for it. Great extras that keep giving too.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Believe What I Believe In, 14 Oct 2006
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Coincidence Vs Fate - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Different Kind of Tension (Audio CD)
I'm amazed that this album isn't available in the UK separately. You can get it as part of the "Product" box set, but the album certainly deserves a remastered release in it's own right.

OK, this is the original lineups last album. Released in September 1979, it shows that the band were heading in a new direction. Though behind the scenes, the band were slowly falling apart, their recorded offerings were still of the highest quality.

Side one is shared between Shelley and Diggle. Pete offers us the catchy "Paradise", the gorgeous "You Say You Don't Love Me" and it's b-side "Raison D'etre". Steve gives us some of his best and strangest material to date, the great "You Know You Can't Help It", complete with dodgy lyrics, "Sitting Round At Home" and the insane "Mad Mad Judy".

This album really comes alive on side two. I've always thought of side two as Pete Shelley's Depression Suite. Pete was obviously starting to go a bit barmy around this time, though his songwriting was going from strength to strength. "I Don't KNow What To Do With My Life" starts the whole proceedings off. Next we get "Money" with it's almost Funky Drummer rhythm. This segues into "Hollow Inside", which if isn't written by a manic depressive then I'll eat my hat! The title track is just, though I don't really mean "just" a list of opposites sung by Shelley. He even goes all Kraftwerk on us at one point with a use of a vocoder, though it's hardly Man Machine, so Ralf and Florian didn't have to worry too much. Next comes the albums Tour De Force, the fantastic "I Believe". A seven minute wonder which includes some of Pete's finest lyrics. His pain clear at the end with a monologue of "there is no love in this world anymore".

Finally, we get the fifty second "Radio Nine", a brief radio transmission where we hear "Everybody's Happy Nowadays" and "Why Can't I Touch It" through the static.

Come on EMI, re-release this great album.

My tip for the day: just don't play it when you're feeling down.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Paradise Buzzcocks, 29 Aug 2014
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Used to have this on LP.

Good to catch up with.

Some good tracks on here such as Paradise.
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1 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight pantomine, 1 Dec 2011
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Love songs or other nonsense for 13 year olds, played by blokes in their early twenties, by the release of this album the novelty effect was already wearing off, many of their student fans had left uni that summer. not least in me demoting buzzcocks was the release in june of joy divisions unknown pleasures, novelty punk/new wave was exposed and something much darker and heavier had arrived. i saw both bands on the same bill in november in derby, joy division being the support, this only reinforced the gulf in class, after joy divisions short 30 mins with ian casting a god like spell on the audience the buzzcocks kicked off their lightweight pantomine racket and i was bored in less than thirty seconds, my three buzzcocks albums were traded in that weekend but joy division albums remain to this day, mills and boon versus macbeth.
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Different Kind of Tension
Different Kind of Tension by Buzzcocks (Audio CD - 2001)
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