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4.5 out of 5 stars198
4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 21 July 2007
While some of The Cure faithful may feel aggrieved by the absence - 'A Forest' notwithstanding - of tracks from their gloomiest period (Faith, Seventeen Seconds, Pornography), the more casual listener will find much to enjoy here. Having had a big Cure phase in my teens, I might quibble that the Boys Don't Cry/Three Imaginary Boys era is under-represented. 'Jumping Someone Else's Train' and 'Killing An Arab', for instance, would have been preferable to some of the relatively non-descript material post-'Friday I'm In Love'. It seems odd also given how fashionable angular post-punk has been in the 00s to skimp on this early period, but ultimately you can't fault this as an introduction to the band.

What is great about this colllection is that The Cure had a habit of reinventing themselves and releasing their most resonant and accessible material as singles. This is not to say that they were a singles band - far from it, your next purchase ought to be 'Disintegration' if you don't own it already - but that this captures the band at their most varied, eccentric best. Whereas some Best-Ofs can seem fairly by-the-numbers, soulless experiences, 'Greatest Hits' is a joy for its vivid eclecticism.

Despite their reputation (not always unfounded) for bleak introspection, 'Greatest Hits' reveals Robert Smith to be one of the best pop songwriters of his generation. 'In Between Days', 'Close To Me', 'Just Like Heaven' are pop perfection, while 'A Forest' and 'Lullaby' harnesses the band's predilection for acid-spiked paranoia in a universably accessible form. Meanwhile the deranged, off-kilter pop of 'The Lovecats' and 'The Caterpillar' straddles the unlikely territory somewhere between these two poles: too saccharine to be goth, too bonkers by most pop tastes. Then you have the raw energy of 'Boy's Don't Cry' and the comparatively lush and expansive pop sensibility of 'Lovesong' and 'Pictures of You'. Thankfully, the collection is also chronological, so you get (almost) the whole Cure story - and a fantastic journey it is.
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Excellent best of compilation from The Cure. Covering the greater part of their career, and showing just what they were capable of from the breezy catchiness of Lovecats through the full gamut of experimentalism and pop through to the moody A Forest. A great place for beginners (such as myself) to start with their music, though it has left me wanting more fo their actual album releases. To be honest, at this price it's worth getting just for the classic that is Lovecats.

Mastering and production are good, with a decent sound and good liner notes. An excellent release, 5 stars.
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on 24 October 2004
Every rock fan will be able to pick this album up and find at least a couple of songs that appeal to them. Ever a versatile band, Robert Smith's voice and the underlying bass guitar riffs are the only real constants throughout this greatest hits package. 'Never Enough' is pure guitar stomp, 'Lovecats' the grooviest of white jazz, and 'Love Song' the most poignant example of Smith's lyric-writing.
What more can I say that hasn't already been said in previous reviews? Even for established Cure fans, this is a very handy condensed package which I would genuinely recommend to anyone around.
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Excellent best of compilation from The Cure. Covering the greater part of their career, and showing just what they were capable of from the breezy catchiness of Lovecats through the full gamut of experimentalism and pop through to the moody A Forest. A great place for beginners (such as myself) to start with their music, though it has left me wanting more fo their actual album releases. To be honest, at this price it's worth getting just for the classic that is Lovecats.

Mastering and production are good, with a decent sound and good liner notes. An excellent release, 5 stars.
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on 14 January 2012
An excellent collection of tracks from the band's career - hearing them together on one album, you're reminded of just what a talented and underrated crew they are. It's all too easy for your main opinion of the The Cure to be shaped by their frankly bonkers videos - and you forget what a great songsmith and vocalist Robert Smith is. The album brings you the twisted pop brilliance of Boys Don't Cry, Lovecats, Close to Me and Just Like Heaven, contrasting with the gothic gloom of A Forest, Lovesong and Lullaby; and Why Can't I Be You is an unsung barnstorming gem in my view. With the exception of Friday I'm in Love, the last 8 tracks are pretty unremarkable (hence 4 not 5 stars), but it's what has gone before that really counts - and the sum total is a truly memorable set. If you're not yet a Cure fan, this cd is the place to start.
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on 27 October 2013
It's funny how musical tastes change over the years. When I was at school, The Cure seemed to be a little left-of-field, and their fans had a demeanour that wasn't me. Looking back, I was into other things at the time which excluded me from fitting in with them. But not necessarily fitting in is what The Cure were about I have subsequently learnt.

"Boys Don't Cry, A Forest, The Lovecats, The Caterpillar, Inbetween Days, Close To Me, Why Can't I Be You?, Lullaby, Pictures of You" and "Friday I'm In Love", are exceptionally beautiful songs, and some still evoke the thoughts and feelings that I had as a teenager.

Belatedly, some 30 odd years later, I feel that I am only now entering the 'left-
of-field' world that I mentioned earlier - just wish I had been part of it in the 80's. Where did all that time go? Anyway, enough of reminiscing about the long and distant past...
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on 11 April 2016
There are already a couple of compilations that cover similar ground to this star-lit effort - 1986's Staring At The Sea - The Singles and 1997's Galore - The Singles 1987-1997 - and Greatest Hits is not the most inspired title you could conjure up. But the selections for this contract-fulfilling, career-spanning overview for Fiction were chosen by the group’s often lipstick-smudged leader Robert Smith. Dark ink-blots of despair like ‘Boys Don’t Cry’, ‘A Forest’, and ‘Lullaby’, are evidence that though the group didn’t like the goth tag they were first labelled with in the early 1980s, it wasn’t an entirely inaccurate one. However, they weren’t always as weighed down by the gloomy studiousness as some critics have suggested. Smith has included a few of their bright, radio-friendly singles, such as the jazz-y ‘The Lovecats’ and the ebullient ‘Friday I'm in Love’, that are a reminder that they seemed quietly fond of the dry ice that sometimes enveloped the garishly-lit Top Of The Pops studio on Thursday nights.

Unfortunately, there is no space here for a couple of their best-known songs - the Albert Camus homage ‘Killing Of An Arab’ and the very New Order-esque ‘The Walk’. Whilst the two new songs that conclude this chronologically-arranged CD - ‘Cut Here’ and ‘Just Say Yes’ - are more of a sop to their hardcore fans who already have everything else here, rather than genuine Greatest Hits.
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on 26 December 2012
The Cure for me always do me some curiosity...they seem's different from the rest of pop rock scene. There sound is easy listening but deeper than other bands. There are good songs few really fantastic but sum don't really impressed me. The voice of the singer are probably too much strident to my standards. And in the last 4 songs of the album lacks quality. But the material inside maybe value 4 stars if you haven't a little less expectations about the whole album.
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on 1 September 2008
The Cure have always been one of these bands that I've only ever half been aware of - I've fully appreciated the impact they've had on the music scene, but I've never really known any of the songs as well as I should have. Which is why I bought this - their Greatest Hits.

People that bleat on and complain about Greatest Hits being too predictable by certain artists miss the point - Best Of compilations are not for the die hard fans - if you're a die hard fan, you should already have all the albums. Best Of's are a great starting point for people just getting into an act. And this is exactly what this does. All the classics are here - Friday I'm In Love, Boys Don't Cry, In Between Days....and that's exactly what people want.

Everybody should have heard of The Cure - use this Greatest Hits as an excuse to finally buy one of their CD's and get to learn how great these tunes that have been played to you over and over again over the past 20 years really are.

To everybody else - stop complaining about Greatest Hits compilations.
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on 12 May 2008
This is a good selection of pop songs...

But those seeking 'what the cure are really all about' should either by the albums or get join the dots (because some of those B-sides are amazing).
The Cure were about long atmospheric pieces of music which conjure up images in your head and evoke moods without even hearing the lyrics. When the lyrics do come they are usually delivered in a despairing hopeless way, or wailed, by Robert Smith and his masterfully unique voice, in the world of Pop/Rock.

Best songs suited for this are all the tracks on 'pornography', and charlotte sometimes, none of which included here.

This is the lighter bouncier commercial side of the Cure. Songs you WILL have heard before but didn't know who it was. Except everyone knows 'Friday I'm In Love' - National Student Anthem.

Staring at the Sea and Galore are better compilations, this skims over too many songs, but If you are going to get anything get disintegration. If you want pop hits, get Head on the door. And go from there
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