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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glowing red
Despite being the finale of the critically acclaimed "Colors" trilogy, "Red" ("Rouge") need not be seen after the similarly beloved "Blue" ("Bleu") and "White" ("Blanc"). As warm and rich as the shades of red scattered through it, this film is one of the most compelling non-American releases in years.
On her way home from a modelling session, Valentine (Irene Jacob)...
Published on 7 Mar 2006 by E. A Solinas

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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "I feel something important is happening around me."
"Red," the final entry in Krzysztof Kieslowski's "Three Colors" trilogy, raises the stakes in terms of storytelling by adding a metaphysical twist to the proceedings. So profound is this twist that it immediately makes you regard the previous two entries in a different light as it turns out there is tighter connection to the three films than previously thought. On its...
Published on 28 Dec 2003 by Steven Y.


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous, 1 Aug 2011
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This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
This film is gorgeous in every way. I cannot count how many times I've watched it. It is by far my favourite of the 3 colours. I highly recommend this film.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece, 17 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Kieslowski bridges the gap between poetry, film and philosophy. Three Colours Red is not only one of the greatest films of all time, it is also one of the most important, summing up as it does the emotional state of life at the end of the 20th century.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best of the triology, 2 July 2008
This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Unlike one or two other reviewers, I thought this was easily the best of the three films, White in particular being slightly disappointing for me.

A thoughtful and beautiful film, I adored the relationship between the two main characters, brought together by loneliness, unhappiness and a mutual canine acquaintance. The camera work and use of colour is magnificent and although it appears languid, almost ponderous, every frame matters, every exchange significant, and every second a pleasure.

Incredible.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 12 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
love this book
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Random personal encounters, 22 Jun 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
RED ends the film trilogy that began with BLUE and WHITE. By the end of RED, it's apparent that one had better see the other two first in order to get the point of them all.
Valentine (Irene Jacob) is a fashion and photography model living in Geneva. One night while driving, her car hits a dog, which she subsequently takes to the vet to be patched up. From the address on the animal's collar, she tracks down the pet's owner, a retired judge (Jean-Louis Trintignant), who has no interest in keeping the dog. As a matter of fact, the man has little interest in life whatsoever except to eavesdrop on the wireless phone conversations of his neighbors. Slowly, however, the chance encounter between Valentine and The Judge grows into a platonic friendship. The potential for other random encounters swirls around Valentine. Some may happen; most will likely not. But this one occurred, and both participants are the better for it.
RED must be the last film of the trilogy seen. At it's conclusion, a most improbable coincidence brings together the major characters of all three. The lesson of BLUE, WHITE and RED in the aggregate appears to be that life is a series of coincidences, and the potential for personal growth from any connection between one or more individuals is a mine of great richness if one cares to work it. Humans are reputed to be a social species. However, the trilogy is perhaps best appreciated by a "people person", who relishes the interaction of daily encounters whether random or not. I'm not that sort (much to my wife's perpetual disgust), so my regard for the series is muted.
I was prepared to give RED three stars until the conclusion, after which I boosted it to four. I recognize the ability of the film, and the trilogy, to stimulate opinionated discussion, which, as long as it doesn't degenerate into name-calling and fisticuffs, is a swell thing, especially over pizza and beer.
RED, WHITE and BLUE also makes the point that there's commonality in the experiences of varied individuals. In each film, the major character observes an old person struggling to insert an empty bottle into the elevated aperture of a large, curbside container for recyclables. Only in RED does the protagonist (Valentine) give aid. Whether there's more to this symbolism or not could be the starting point of another discussion. It only indicated to me that Valentine was the more generous and less self-absorbed of the three.
I liked RED and its predecessors, but am not such a profound thinker as to regard them as Great Cinematic Contributions.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best film of the best trilogy ever made, 17 Jan 2010
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This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Words simply fail me. The final chapter of Kieslowski's amazing trilogy is one of the most stunning films ever made, and I don't want to spoil it in any way. Just watch it.
The edition is very good, too, in case you were wondering.
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5 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly, a modern masterpiece., 25 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Three Colours Red (following on from Blue and White) is a film which expertly draws the audience into the narrative through realistic dialogue, understated photography, and a storyline that is wholly original.
The principle actors, Irene Jacob and Jean-Louis Trintignant are both excellent and it is there strangely involving relationship that builds on a story that is thoroughly absorbing and which at times exudes an almost supernatural quality.
The score, composed by Zbigniew Preisner, is incredibly beautiful, incorporating subtle dark tones that serve to reinforce the mystic quality of the film.
If you truly appreciate films, you will not be disappointed with this, the last of both the Three Colours trilogy and the works of Krzysztof Kieslowski.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not a great transfer, 11 Sep 2008
By 
N. C. Bateman (Brighton, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
I have this (the Artificial Eye release). It's a bit thin and fuzzy and a little background research suggests that the R1 NTSC copy is a lot better, with stronger colour, contrast and detail (though Blue and White seem to be ok on both sides of the Pond). I suspect there'll be a remastered "trilogy" set from France (probably Mk2) sooner or later.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Director ran out of steam, 27 Feb 2011
By 
J. R. Moss (London UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
Trois Couleurs: Rouge
1994 French
This is the third of the three films by acclaimed Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski in his abstract study of the vaunted values of the French Revolution. Alas, it is by far the weakest both in story terms and in inventiveness. One has throughout the sense that it was made simply to finish the set and that in reality the whole thing had run out of steam. It is attractive visually and not wholly predictable but not that interesting either.
The quality for examination is Fraternity ie as here interpreted, a belief in the essential goodness of humanity and by extension of the universe around. Whilst one may agree with the sentiment or not, the heroine's inability to conceive of the alternative, rational, point of expression is hard to swallow. Of course it is interesting to contrast the details of Blue where the little old lady struggles to recycle a bottle but here is helped or the nest of dead rats from the first film to compare with the litter of live puppies. But are we that interested in the doings of a peeping (listening) Tom in the form of the retired judge spying by telephone net on his very boring Swiss neighbours? Or the incredibly long sequences of no dialogue and scattered dark shots? Call me trite but I find it too chintzy where the photo the girl selects at the outset as her model shot for "fear" is identical to the shot of her at the end of the film in real life as only one of a handful of ferry-sinking survivors. Traces of twentieth century magic obsession made worse by the presence of the "fortuitous" appearance similarly as survivors of all the other Trois Couleurs central characters when the channel ferry goes down. Sorry - the other two films had something to say. I may have missed the point here but I did try.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the most atmospheric film I've seen, 14 Dec 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] (DVD)
I didn't see Three colours Blue or White before this one
but I still enjoyed this film on its own merits.Like many
of Kieslowsky's films you're never sure what they mean but for some reason they are compelling viewing.The acting is first class and you will want to watch it all again.
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Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994]
Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] by Krzysztof Kieslowski (DVD - 2001)
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