Customer Reviews


140 Reviews
5 star:
 (112)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (8)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


80 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the most complete album I've ever heard
I first picked this album up in 1990, after hearing Jimmy Page play a tantalising snippet of the Kashmir riff on Arena's 'Heavy Metal' documentary.

At that time buying a double lp was quite an investment for a schoolkid on pocket money alone, but I was mesmerized by the mystery around *that* riff and the fact the album looked so unusual. What I couldn't have...
Published on 26 Mar 2007 by Rich

versus
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Physical Graffiti
Compared to the first five albums this one is a disappointment. Believe me, I have been trying to like all of it for thirty years but ultimately there is just too much filler. If they had just released sides 1 and 2 as a single album then we would be talking utter monster: Custard Pie, the Rover and In My Time of Dying on side 1, Houses of the Holy, Trampled Underfoot...
Published 20 months ago by Pevo


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

80 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the most complete album I've ever heard, 26 Mar 2007
By 
Rich (Bournemouth, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
I first picked this album up in 1990, after hearing Jimmy Page play a tantalising snippet of the Kashmir riff on Arena's 'Heavy Metal' documentary.

At that time buying a double lp was quite an investment for a schoolkid on pocket money alone, but I was mesmerized by the mystery around *that* riff and the fact the album looked so unusual. What I couldn't have expected was to seemingly stumble on something so complete and fulfilling, that I would still be returning to it every week for the next 15 years or more.

Each time I listen, I discover a new angle to a song. Another riff, another rhythm track, another vocal line. Zeppelin were truly at the height of their majestic powers when this album was released in 1975.

This is partially a result of a patchwork chronolgy behind the songs. Some were outtakes from previous studio works ('Houses of the Holy', 'Black Country Woman', 'Boogie with Stu'). Others were adaptations of previous songs, once ditched and now ressurected and re-worked during 1974 ('The Rover', 'Down By the Seaside').

The longest songs are invariably the newest and it is clear that on this album Zeppelin's intention was to define the 'epic'. 'Kashmir' is monstrous, sounding like it has been hewn from the roots of the Earth. It's sister-piece, 'In the Light' adds a darker tone. Then there is the electric storm of 'In My Time of Dying', crackling with intensity, slide guitar, prayers to Jesus and the relentless thunder of Bonzo's drums.

My favourite song (at the moment) is 'Ten Years Gone', a lovesong no less. However this arrangement is probably the most complex and painstaking ever assembled by Page, and the effect is stunning. Multiple guitar overdubs make a plaintive call against Plant's wistful recollections of love once lost.

This is an album of moods - covering the entire spectrum. As well as the epics there is much light relief and plain 'ole rock 'n' roll. 'Custard Pie', 'Sick Again' and most notably 'Trampled Underfoot' with Jones' infectious clavier riff.

The most rewarding album I can think of.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you only buy one Led Zeppelin Album, 10 May 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
Congratulations! You have chosen well. Seven years on the road have paid off and the band lay down the tracks which will propel them into the stratosphere. Here, you get the lot: earthy blues, driving rock, intimate ballads, fun, laughter, all in all, 80-odd minutes of JOY!
The sheer weight of tracks like Custard Pie, Kashmir, The Rover would sit well in any band's entire canon but they are here on the first disc! Above all, it's the way the band nail every song in total sympathy with each other. True, Page lays down the guitar overdubs at times like he has to sell them tomorrow, but what a result.
And as an answer to the question 'where is the follow-up to 'Stairway to Heaven?' look no further than Kashmir and Ten Years Gone as worthy replacements.
Usually by side four, bands start to waver and it's true that Zep added some earlier also-rans but they stand up by themselves and only once drop into the realms of 'filler' on the singalong 'Boogie with Stu', but an album that can end on a great rock track after 80 minutes puts that into perspective and 'Sick again' is a worthy closer.
30 years on, it still hits all the right buttons.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Consistently Mesmerising, 10 May 2007
By 
Chris G. (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
I think it's fair to assert that an artist must be relatively confident in their own abilities when they decide to attempt a double-album. Albums of such a prolonged nature commonly lose their grasp upon the listener after a certain period of time, even if the standard of music is immaculate. I don't think I've ever heard a truly gripping double-album. Except this!! `Physical Graffiti' is arguably what separates Led Zeppelin from practically every other rock band in history. Their ability to consistently churn out pioneering, varied and tantalisingly diverse tracks is astounding.

`Physical Graffiti' boasts a ridiculous amount of masterfully fashioned music. From huge, audacious trailblazing riffs, to soaring, evocative blues solos, to those secreted sounds which only become fully apparent after a particularly intensive listening bout.

The album is literally an endless chain of classic songs, and Led Zeppelin certainly aren't circumscribed by pre-conceived genre boundaries. The tracks here range from the startling, blues suite, `In My Time Of Dying', which showcases the band at their jaw-dropping collective music peak, to the timeless `Down By The Seaside', with its infectious chorus sung in a characteristically flawless manner by the effervescent Robert Plant. The unmistakable riff that propels `Kashmir' displays the delightfully innovatory approach of guitarist, Jimmy Page; here he alters his guitar's tuning to extract novel, almost mystical tones.

I could joyfully write hundreds of words passionately and verbosely eulogising over each track, however I think you get the picture. This is the greatest double-album ever conceived, and a staple rock album that no home should be without! Enjoy!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A seminal release, 10 Mar 2008
By 
Steven Athwal "Steevo" (Edinburgh Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
An album that catches Led Zeppelin at the peak of their creativity, there is a timelessness about Physical Graffiti that makes it as relevant today as it was in 1975. This relevance comes in the complexity of the arrangements, and in the breadth of song styles, and ultimately in the untrammelled joy the musicians capture. Bonham's drumming on In My Time Of Dying has a precision and feel unrivalled before or since, whilst Jimmy Page pulls the full range of tonality and texture from his guitar, from the sleazy riff of Sick Again to the lightness of touch of In The Light. And whilst Stairway To Heaven might be popularly recognised to be their crowning glory, the real majesty and mystery of Zeppelin is captured beautifully on Kashmir, where Plant in particular adds a lilting gravitas to the lyric which is achingly beautiful. Do not be fooled into thinking Led Zeppelin were merely a rock group or (heaven forbid) a heavy metal band - Physical Graffiti set a creative benchmark that still awaits serious competition. Buy immediately and enrich your life forever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelins Finest Moment., 11 July 2006
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
This album shows Zep at there very best. As previous reviews have stated it`s a collection of [then] new recordings mixed with older tracks from previous sessions that didn`t make it onto there previos albums. Some of the best Riffs in Rock/Metaldom reside on this album. "Kashmir" "Rover" "Ten Years Gone" etc. Page was experimenting with Eastern music & incorporated it into this album. "In THe Light" & "Kashmir" show this of brilliantly. The songs that were written for this album are simply the best collection Zep ever wrote. The only down side of this album was that after 2yrs solid touring Plants voice was shot & it shows. Not his best vocal sound but good enough, It`s Page that shines on this album & delivers his finest guitar playing. Check Out the best track on the album "Ten Years Gone" for proof of how good he really was. Bonhams drumming is outstanding to. Jones holds the whole thing together as usual as Page weaves his magic. Page regards this album as Zeps most Honest album, he`s right it`s great. If your New to Zep & Rock / Metal then this album is a great place to start. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely essential!, 25 Nov 2003
By 
N Ganesh (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
So much has been written about Led Zeppelin that its difficult to find an original angle to write about- but all you need to know is that Physical Graffiti is a towering achievement in rock records and a frequent member of most top 50 albums of all time. Its fair to say that this was Zep at their absolute best- it couldn't and wasn't surpassed after this. I first had this in vinyl in 1981 and remains a frequent player in my house to this day. The unitiated listener will be surprised by the sheer variety on this record- plenty of blues influences (Custard Pie, In My Time of Dying) but with funk, folk, pop, and anything else you care to think of. It was conceived at a time when punk wasn't so far away and was supposed to represent the worst excesses of rock music in the '70s but Page and co threw the kitchen sink at this and whilst it isn't perfect it gets as close as any band had a right to do and still stands up scrutiny in 2003. If you only ever buy one Zep album this has to be it. In my opinion the definitive rock album of all time!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock Gods in Their Prime, 13 Dec 2007
By 
Chuck E (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
All the hoop-la surrounding the mothership of all reunions had me delving back into my vinyl collection try to recall the impact of the Zep behemoth on an impressionable teenager. Zep I and II set the template, Led Zep III took off in another direction to remind everyone that the band had too much imagination to be ghettoised under the label `heavy metal'. Zep IV then fused the hippie/folk/blues/metal elements into a rock masterclass that would render any attempt at emulation hopeless. Houses of the Holy followed up in the only way possible, by experimenting in new directions/arrangements.

So, by Physical Graffiti the band had scaled the heights and were already gazing down from the rock pantheon - where to go from there? This is where I came in. Of course I'd heard the Top of the Pops theme tune but back then, unless you had an older brother, it was quite possible to never hear or see Led Zeppelin - no singles meant no radio play (unless you knew about John Peel), videos hadn't been invented. So it was purely on seeing a strange but inspired film clip of some 1920s dancing girls flapping to some American singer (as I then thought) wailing away over the megariff of Trampled Under Foot (see YouTube) that prompted me to shell out on a double cassette without having heard of Led Zeppelin. Slapping it into my mono tapedeck, the sublime noise that was Custard Pie cast a spell that has lasted 30 years. The downside is - nothing is ever going to sound that good again. The combination of raw power and stunning musicianship was just irresistible. With twelve rock classics on one album this was the high water mark. Presence had a couple of tracks (Nobody's Fault and Achilles Last Stand) that would hold their own on a `best of', but never again would they be able to compete with a back catalogue that included Custard Pie, In My Time of Dying, Trampled Underfoot, Kashmir, Ten Years Gone. The range of Plant's vocals, Page's riffing, Bonham's murderous drumming and JPJ's bass/keyboard work on this album has no equal.

You'll never spend under a tenner more wisely.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best's Best, 16 Nov 2007
By 
Crazy Bald Heid "kennyb63" (Surrey, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
In my opinion the high water mark for the greatest rock band. They were clearly at their peak when this was made, creatively bold and exciting.

This sprawling set starts with a straight up riffy rocker Houses of the Holy, title track on the wrong album.

Trampled underfoot is simlarly rocky but Percy comes on all Noddy Holder with his roughest vocal, a really stirring track.

Kashmir, Zeppelins most epic epic. Perennial poll topper on Tommy Vance's Friday Rock show (remember when BBC used to play rock). Whilst the motif is repetetive, it never feels like a repetetive song because it is one hell of a riff. Bonzo's thumping driving drum track as ever is relentless in its intemsity. Exotic, thumping, massive classic. Possibly their finest hour (or 9 minutes anyway), a true ensemble piece.

Custard pie stomps away in a similar fashion to Trampled Underfoot, great rocker.

The Rover is a hidden gem, as with all Zeppelins rock songs driven by great riffs and impossibly tight rhythms.

In My Time of Dying is an old Delta blues reworked, no one does blues rock like these boys. Overlong? I really don't think so. I love it right up to Percy's dying cough at the end. Ace.

In the Light's, multitracked opening vocal and reedy organ sounds otherworldly, but it opens out into a beautiful rock song.

Bron Y Aur Stomp is Jimmy Page showing his virtuosity in a terrific acoustic piece, a change down in gear from the monster riffs that cram this album.

Down by the seaside has a ethereal, trippy quality which belies a melodic beauty. Another of the Zep songs which builds.

Ten Years Gone is another lengthy blues rock work out, beautiful riff.

Night Flight is a return to more straight forward rock, more melodic than the Wanton Song which follows.

Boogie with Stu is a boogie woogie work out with erstwhile "6th Stone" Ian Stewart at the piano. Sounds like a great after hours sing song.

Black Country Woman continues the boogie woogie styling, nothing earth breaking but a good tune nonetheless.

Sick Again a big, blues rocker like no other closes the greatest of albums

This is not to everybodys taste but I never tire of it, in cd form I miss the original New York brownstone building package with the windows, although I have the Japanese replica, it is too small. The remaster is excellent, the original cd release was a little tinny. Everything about this album is epic, the riffs on here would fill most player careers.

Enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lauded as Legends, 30 Oct 2013
By 
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
"Mr Page thanks you for your time,but would prefer it if you left now."With that phrase, my Interview with Jimmy Page, in town to promote this album, ended prematurely. I had apparently transgressed the law of not asking about his personal life. I had enquired about how he used his time in between recording his contribution to this mammoth endeavour, at which point, he went silent. He lit a cigarette, and using a prearranged signal which to this day I am unaware of, his assistant moved in.

I am quite used to rock star egos- one of these days I will tell about my spat with Freddie Mercury in 1982- but this one I was a little unprepared for. I have never really been able to treat this album objectively since, but I will give it a go now.

There are a number of bona-fide bone crunching classics in here."In my time of dying" is a complete tour de force, careering between abandon and control, at times coming close to collapsing under its own weight. It is just about saved from doing so by the skill and dexterity of the four horsemen of the apocalypse that were Led Zep, and it is marvellous."Kashmir" of course everyone is familiar with, with it's eastern, ah, influences shall we say, and its blend of mysticism and metal. "Ten Years Gone" is another sprawling testament, and proves, as does much of this record, that self indulgence is not neccesarily a bad thing.

In fact that is the message that this album clearly sends out. In the case of these virtuosos, if you leave them to their own devices, give them as much time, money, recreation and freedom as they require, the results are,surprisingly,magnificent for the most part.

True, the Doobie Bros rip off that is "Trampled Underfoot" we could've done without and I was never too struck on "the Rover", but even slight, low effort stuff like "Boogie with Stu" or "Black Country woman" gets away with it by virtue of musical artistry elsewhere.

So some flab, as you may expect, but a lot less than you think.LZ have been responsible for the odd atrocity, and they were one of the reasons we have the Sex Pistols, but this album, at its best shows why they are quite rightly lauded as legends. Pity about the interview thing though..........
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zep's finest hour and a half, 19 Mar 2002
By 
A. D. R. MARKS "adrmarks" (Warwickshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
Most people rave about Led Zeppelin II or IV (for 'Whole Lotta Love' or 'Stairway to Heaven' respectively) but for my money, if you own no other Zeppelin albums you should at least own this one. And if you do own this one, you'll want to buy the others - guaranteed.
Certainly it's hard to credit listening to it that this was largely an 'odds and sods' album of leftovers from previous albums (don't ask ME why they were leftovers!) The consistency of quality is astonishing, as is the range of material. 'Kashmir' of course needs no introduction with its fantastically epic sweep (keep the overrated 'Stairway to Heaven', THIS is their real masterpiece). Likewise the album's other epic 'In My Time of Dying' with it's somewhat psychotic blues/slide guitar continues to shine, but there are still gems a plenty. JPJ really comes into his own with the broad use of keyboards (synths, Fender Rhodes, Hammonds). Check out 'Trampled Under Foot' and 'In the Light' to hear him stealing the scene from the rest of the band. Actually, my own favourite is the very last song 'Sick Again'. No idea why, it just appeals. It's also (like most of the best Zeppelin material) a great one for strumming along to: the beauty - and genius - of much of the LZ canon is its simplicity, most of us can play along to it. A must have.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Physical Graffiti [VINYL]
Physical Graffiti [VINYL] by Led Zeppelin (Vinyl - 2001)
Click for more info
Currently unavailable
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews