Customer Reviews


641 Reviews
5 star:
 (473)
4 star:
 (70)
3 star:
 (40)
2 star:
 (24)
1 star:
 (34)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What an amazing film but where are the extras?
Blade Runner still stands up as one of the greatest films ever. The stunning visuals look great on a DVD player and the Vangelis soundtrack comes through with crystal clarity. This is definitely a movie to have on DVD but why only four stars? Because somebody forgot to put a plethora of extras on the disc. Where are the missing scenes? (like Deckard visiting Holden in...
Published on 22 July 2000

versus
38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An improvement, but could do better
Blade Runner, Ridley Scott's masterpiece of a dystopian future, is available again on DVD. Hoorah!

Well - not quite. The new release has a few improvements - after all, the original Warner Brothers release went straight into the film; you didn't even get a menu. But there are drawbacks too.

For a start, expect to do lots of button-pressing on your...
Published on 10 Oct 2006 by Chris H


‹ Previous | 1 265 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What an amazing film but where are the extras?, 22 July 2000
By A Customer
Blade Runner still stands up as one of the greatest films ever. The stunning visuals look great on a DVD player and the Vangelis soundtrack comes through with crystal clarity. This is definitely a movie to have on DVD but why only four stars? Because somebody forgot to put a plethora of extras on the disc. Where are the missing scenes? (like Deckard visiting Holden in hospital) Where are the documentries? Where are the insights into the filming and SFX? All we get is a small bit about cast and a scene selector that has about nine or so of the scenes that are on the entire film all on the one screen. This should be a 'special edition', a 'collectors edition' not a knock it out cheap and rake it in that it seems to have turned into.
The film itself however benefits from being able to watch it in widescreen and full screen but be warned the widescreen is incredable thin.
Worth having but could they not have done something more with the format.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best, Ever., 31 Jan 2007
By 
K. C. Simm "kenart" (Lancashire UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Despite all the furore over which cut is best, (without the happy ending is the most important change in my view, I have mixed feelings about the Decker voice over) this is quite simply the best Sci Fi film ever and surely one of the best films of the 20th Century. From the opening dark and ominous long shot over the pyramids of LA supported by a brilliantly moody and atmospheric Vangelis soundtrack, through Roy's stunningly over the top, poeticly scripted, (by Hauer himself apparently) death speech, (C beams glittering in the dark) to the final mystery or mysteries,(who is or is not a replicant) it remains a nigh on perfect piece of work. It certainly ranks with Ridley Scott's other seminal early ,masterpiece, Alien,in fact Blade Runner does have the edge insofar as style, script, art direction and just general artistic merit. Although Alien is the scarier. Wait for the new cut if you wish or buy both, whatever, but look, understand and enjoy. This is cinema art in its purist form and ranks with all the masterpieces of cinema. The only other Sci Fi that comes even close is 2001.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


378 of 404 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars REVIEW OF 5-DVD SET - NOT ANY OTHER VERSION, 14 Dec 2007
By 
Mr. M. A. Reed (Argleton, GB) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
At long last, "Blade Runner" gets the definitive treatment it needs. With a release as lavish and enormous as this, there is no possibility of an abusive triple, quadruple, or seventh-re-release : almost everything you could possibly want is here.

"Blade Runner" is one of the greatest science fiction films ever made : a period piece set in an impossible future, a film noir detective thriller that uses the endless possibilities of Science Fiction to explore inner and outer space, a meditation of the nature of humanity, identity, and conscience. It is without doubt the finest film that anyone ever involved with it ever worked on. Given that the people who worked on it were also involved in "Star Wars", "2001", "Alien", and ...um... "Blind Fury"... that speaks for itself. I won't waste words on the film anymore : you either know what it is or you don't. If you don't - watch it. If you do - you know what I'm talking about. It's a classic - and one of the best films ever made.

This DVD re-release features a whopping 5 DVD's of material. Disc 1 contains the "Final Cut" :Ridley Scott's intended version that was sabotaged by brainless studio nincompoops and accountants. Here, Ridley has revisited and completed the film so it is now the way it was always meant to be seen. To the average viewer, these changes are often miniscule and barely noticeable : to the enthusiast they are the final brushstrokes to Scott's masterpiece. It's still "Blade Runner" though. If you liked it then, you'll like it now. If you didn't, you won't. But this Final Cut (the fifth version of the film released) is a film of such merit it deserves to be hung in a museum as one of the greatest justifications for mankinds continued existence.

The first disc is fleshed with three commentaries : Ridley Scott is, as ever, a fascinating orator. The other commentaries are equally interesting. The second DVD contains "Dangerous Days", an enormous, standard-setting, 214 minute `making of' document that covers every element of the films existence in forensic detail. It's a fascinating journey : packed with interviews with everyone who was even slightly involved in the film (including characters cut from any released version), as well as stuffed to the gills with bonus material : whereas some documentaries will use clips from the film to demonstrate the finished product, this chooses (wisely) to show reams of alternate takes, deleted scenes, and unused footage across its length. This is the definitive `Making Of' by which all others must be judged. To anyone who has seen the film more than once, it is an absolutely essential piece of work.

DVD 3 contains the three previously released versions of the film. Including the 1982 International Cut (with a fraction more violence), and the 1991 Directors Cut (which in reality was a rushed studio hodge podge with no actual direct input from Ridley Scott). Each prefaced by an introduction from Ridley Scott, and exist largely for the sake of the completists.

DVD 4 meanwhile, wraps up the remaining material. There are 48 minutes of deleted scenes arranged to create a vignette/montage alternate version of the film - it would have been fascinating to see these alternate trims placed in the context of a entire `deleted scenes' version of the film. The deleted scenes themselves are generally unexceptional (and when viewed it is easy to see why they were not in the finished product) but are essential viewing to see All That Could Have Been. DVD 4 also features two hours of extra documentaries detailing the P K Dick novel, the adaptation process, how the film and novel differ, and a cornucopia of additional material that covers literally everything under the sun from the films influence on cinema, the ethos of poster art, to - in all probability - a documentary about the Kitchen Sinks used in the film.

DVD5 meanwhile, features a remastered copy of the first ever seen version of the film - a rough cut `Workprint' that previewed to a few hundred in 1982 - and this version is undoubtedly the Holy Grail of the Blade Runner world. Seeing this version, when compared to the original cinema release, is akin to seeing two completely different films in tone and style : the violence is harder, the narration and voiceover absent, the film no longer insults the viewer with Vlad The Explainer condescendingly commenting on the events of the film. This version of the film - clearly a work in progress - is as ever an intelligent, sensitive film that explores the basic questions of humanity. The disc is rounded off with a commentary by author (and renowned Blade Runner authority) Paul Sammon, and a final 30 minute look through the torturous evolution - and multiple versions - of the film to its Final Cut. It's a final fascinating glimpse into the process.

Given the sheer wealth of material (I estimate at least 26 hours of stuff spread over the five discs - the largest amount yet compiled for any one film that I know of), it seems almost churlish to gripe about what is missing : original plans were to include the Channel 4 documentary "The Edge Of Human", but the material in that is exhaustively covered elsewhere in this set so it would be almost redundant were it included. Overall, if you have the slightest interest in film or Science Fiction, this is an absolute no brainer Must-Buy and sets the standard as the High Watermark of DVD releases so far in the formats first decade.

Simply put, it's one of the most comprehensive and thus, definitive DVD packages to ever exist. At last Warners have given this great work of art the attention, care, and investment it deserves. Buy it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


184 of 199 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the one to buy - especially at this price!, 12 Sep 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
For the price amazon uk are charging for this i say that even if its not precisely the same as following its still worth it and recommend any fan of BR to get this version particularly if it does have the much fabled work print which is worth its weight in gold!

The following detail appears on the USA Amazon site for this same set the 5 disc ultimate edition

By calvinnme "Texan refugee" (Fredericksburg, Va)

Disc 1 - Ridley Scott's All-New "Final Cut" Version of the film - Restored and remastered with added and extended scenes, added lines, new and cleaner special effects and all new 5.1 Dolby Digital Audio. Also included is commentary by Ridley Scott and a host of others that worked behind the camera.

Disc 2 - Documentary - Dangerous Days: Making of Blade Runner - A feature-length documentary about the film including viewpoints and insights from the cast and crew. Included are details on every stage of production of the film including special effects, casting, and even the film's literary roots and its place in the sci-fi genre.

Disc 3 - 1982 Theatrical Version - The original that contains Deckard's narration and has Deckard and Rachel's (Sean Young) "happy ending" escape scene.

1982 International Version - Also used on U.S. home video, laserdisc and cable releases up to 1992. This version is not rated, and contains some extended action scenes in contrast to the Theatrical Version.

1992 Director's Cut - Omits Deckard's voiceover narration and removes the "happy ending" finale. It adds the famous "unicorn" sequence, which is a vision that Deckard has which suggests that he is also a replicant.

Disc 4 - BONUS Disc "Enhancement Archive" - Eight featurettes, image galleries, radio interview with the author, and screen tests for the part of Rachel.

Disc 5 - Workprint Version - This rare version of the film is considered by some to be the most radically different of all the Blade Runner cuts. It has an altered opening scene, no Deckard narration until the final scenes, no "unicorn" sequence, no Deckard/Rachel "happy ending," altered lines between Rutger Hauer and his creator Tyrell (Joe Turkell), and alternate music.

Also included is commentary by Paul M. Sammon, author of Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner and a featurette - "All Our Variant Futures: From Workprint to Final Cut".

All of the information on the features comes directly from a press release from Warner Home Video
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An improvement, but could do better, 10 Oct 2006
Blade Runner, Ridley Scott's masterpiece of a dystopian future, is available again on DVD. Hoorah!

Well - not quite. The new release has a few improvements - after all, the original Warner Brothers release went straight into the film; you didn't even get a menu. But there are drawbacks too.

For a start, expect to do lots of button-pressing on your remote before you start: the UK is at the end of the third screen of language options, and there's no default selection - an elementary mistake. Once you've selected the language you want, expect to sit through the "you are supporting terrorism through piracy" trail that every WB and Fox release seems to carry, which is both offensive and patronising. At least on this disk you can speed it up, even if you can't skip it. Finally, you get to the menu (which gives you bare-bones options of language and scene selections) and you can start watching the film.

Once the film starts, the annoyances are forgotten. The opening titles have been redone: the originals wobbled quite noticably, and that jitter is now absent. When the action itself starts, it becomes apparent that this time the mastering has been done by someone who knew what they were doing - for instance they've actually cleaned the print before they started. Look closely at the 1999 release and you see frame after frame covered with dirt - hair, dust, speckles, you name it - and they're all missing from the new version. The colours are brighter and there's better contrast, too. However, all of this is let down slightly by the fact that the soundtrack is still only two-channel Dolby Surround.

So, seven years from the original release, we can watch the copy we should have got in the first place. If you're desperate to see BR on DVD, then you'll get what you need here. However, things have come a long way in the DVD world since 1999, and a film of this calibre really deserves something better. The good news is that a three-disc special edition is on the way that will, hopefuly, finally do this film justice. You might want to hang on for a few months until it's released.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still visionary after all these years, now breathtaking again, 20 May 2008
By 
Martin Turner "Martin Turner" (Marlcliff, Warwickshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm a Ridley Scott fan, and this is the film that made me one. When I first saw it twenty-five years ago, I was knocked over by the visionary world which was immaculately detailed in all the run-down future sordidness that Philip K Dick's original inspired. The fact that the plot is really very different from 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep', and the title is borrowed from two other science-fiction writers, is not an issue. Scott brilliantly fused a dystopian future out of the very best and darkest material around, and created something which redefined film science fiction and continues to do so.
Blu-ray brings Blade Runner back to life, with colour and resolution to make the most of the endlessly detailed presentation. Of the range of titles available, this was the film I most wanted to watch first on Blu-ray, and it didn't disappoint me.
To be completely honest, I have now lost track of how many different version of Blade Runner I have seen, and I'm only going to compare this one to the original cinema release. Scott already decided some time ago to get rid of the happy-ending voiceover. To some extent, I wish I had only seen this final-cut version, because it's very hard not to supply the happy-ending in your mind afterwards. The other real benefit of this over earlier versions is the restoration of the footage to pristine condition.

A lot of people have written reviews comparing this disc to US imports, other UK versions of the film, and ordinary DVD versions. Watching Blade Runner: The Final Cut did not inspire me to think about any of those things. Instead, I was left with the warm glow of a gorgeous visual-audio experience, which completely drew me into its world.

For me, that is enough.

Absolutely recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Sci-Fi Masterpiece just got better!, 7 Mar 2007
Bladerunner is a paradox in that: the older it gets the fresher it looks. When first released in 1982 it's public reception was luke warm to say the least. Over time, fuelled by it's video and subsequent DVD release, an army of Bladerunner fans have emerged to fight its corner. Some films achieve cult status on a whim and question marks continue to hang over their quality. With Bladerunner this is certainly not the case.

Set in 21st century Los Angeles, Harrison Ford plays Deckard, a policeman from an elite unit (Bladerunners) with the remit to hunt down hunanoid robots (Replicants) who attempt to integrate into human society. When several replicants come to earth aiming to infiltrate the company that made them in a bid to extend their lifespan, Deckard is sent to track them down.

This cut removes the voice over and upbeat ending prevelent in the original 1982 cinema release and as such the film morphs into a darker and more claustrophobic entity. This enhances Doug Trumball's (2001, Close Encounters of the Third Kind) stunning special effects which easily match any of the CGI work on show today. And Hampton Fancher and David Peoples have crafted a script which forever questions the ethics of creating sentient beings but not allowing for the growth of autonomy or rights.

The 25th anniversary cut of Bladerunner is soon due for release but for those who have never journied into this remarkable and uncertain future, this is a memorable introduction.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


59 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A near perfect version of BladeRunner., 24 Dec 2007
By 
P. White (Cambridge, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I watched this on my 52" 1080p set so I could see the detail and I was continually laughing with delight. It looks stunning now. The production team have completely restored the print and the FX shots such as the opening sequence and the Spinner flight over the Tyrell Corporation building are pure and show a level of detail that I didn't even realize existed in the shot. Bear in mind I've seen a cinema version of this film in the old Director's Cut format and I can assure you that this is order of magnitude from that. All of the FX problems have been corrected: no wires lifting the Spinners, no stunt-woman's face on the dying Zhora etc. It's really interesting seeing that contents of Deckard's apartment for the first time. The clarity of the print reveals objects in his room that I'd not noticed. Some minor dialogue has changed but for the better and only in inconsequential places such as the description of the Nexus-6 team in Bryant's office. The audio is now 5.1 and much improved. The new version of the film is near perfect. It has been adjusted in such a subtle way that it is really just a superb restoration rather than a major change and yet a lot HAS changed. It's a tribute to Scott's team that the casual observer would barely notice.
I'm VERY impressed and delighted.
However, as has been stated by other reviewers there is a 5 disc set easily available from the US, region free and with great extras for little more than this offering. You might want to consider it but be quick because it's limited(ish).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blade Runner 2006 dvd reason to buy!, 27 Dec 2006
By 
Andy Millea - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I just bought the new 2006 release (9.99 euro in a HMV sale here in Dublin) would agree with the majority of peoples disappointment re: the audio, (just Dolby stereo) the only thing I would say is that there is a substantial increase in the picture quality, probably not a re-mastering of the negative but a cleaner transfer to dvd with the better compression tools available now over those available in 1999, and for such a dark (brightness level wise!) film, it makes a big difference, plus its proper anamorphic not the 1999 cropped at the sides version. To reiterate: for 9.99 (in my case) its well worth for my favorite film ever. And I wouldn't hold my breath for the special edition release in 2007.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magic!, 9 July 2007
By 
Cottoboi "chriso" (Bromley, London, UK) - See all my reviews
Blade runner, firstly, is unique. It advises the viewer to be totally immersed into the film as its wide stretch of capabilities are in no way predictable!
It follows Harrison Ford as Rick Deckard, a cop in the near future who searches the futuristic jungle of LA for criminal replicants. Harrison displays a tremendous understanding to the script and relates to Deckard as the cocky cop!
Another top of the range feature in blade runner is the music. 'Chariots of fire' composer, Vangelis, creates a score so widely entertaining and fitting that director Ridley Scott experimented with his previous works in future films.
The action is superb. sometimes eerie and weird yet completely entertaining and operatic! The final scene is popular amongst film junkies and creates a special connection between Deckard and the replicants, leaving the 'could it be?' style possibility that Deckard could've been a replicant himself!
In conclusion the film is brilliant, classic and emotional. It will be everything you would've imagined and so much more! Matrix fans and fifth element fans will adore this!
Buy it now.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 265 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Blade Runner [DVD] [1982]
Blade Runner [DVD] [1982] by Ridley Scott (DVD)
£102.39
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews