Customer Reviews


121 Reviews
5 star:
 (88)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (7)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


71 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A song of Africa; and: What price freedom?
He likes to distill his movies' themes into a single word, Sydney Pollack explains on "Out of Africa"'s DVD. Here, that word is "Possession:" The possessiveness of the colonialists trying to make Africa theirs; to rule her with their law, settle on the local tribes' land, dress their African servants in European outfits (complete with a house boy's white gloves), import...
Published on 2 Jun 2005 by Themis-Athena

versus
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is for the blu-ray transfer only, the movie is fantastic
The transfer in this edition is a cryout shame. So much DNR that faces look waxy, details are lost, and even make small borders "halo-double". I watched it in a 52" screen, so maybe in smaller screens this is not so noticeable; in large ones, it is unbearable. In a movie where landscape and photography are main characters as well, this is just outrageous. Yes, it is still...
Published on 5 Nov 2011 by Francisco Josť Poyato Ariza


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is for the blu-ray transfer only, the movie is fantastic, 5 Nov 2011
By 
Francisco Josť Poyato Ariza "Fran" (Madrid, Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Out of Africa [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The transfer in this edition is a cryout shame. So much DNR that faces look waxy, details are lost, and even make small borders "halo-double". I watched it in a 52" screen, so maybe in smaller screens this is not so noticeable; in large ones, it is unbearable. In a movie where landscape and photography are main characters as well, this is just outrageous. Yes, it is still the best transfer to date, but worthless as a blu-ray. Far much worse than the first, poor transfer of "Gladiator". Let's hope they will eventually remaster "Out of Africa" properly, because this wonderful movie deserves it; as far as I am concerned, I possess the blu-ray, but am still unable to watch this movie in high definition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Digibook is not remastered, 25 Dec 2012
By 
Rich McG (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I presume most people wanting to buy this Blu-ray digibook edition have already seen the film, so you already know whether you like it. For my money, it's a very good period romance, but never quite steps over into great (except, of course, John Barry's wonderful score). The film alone would get four stars from me.

I'm mainly writing this review to make clear that Universal have taken the cheapskate option with this release. Unlike the US digibook, which has exactly the same cover design, the disc you'll find inside this one is the same disc as the previous release - the one with poor picture quality. It's blurry, smoothed over, lacking in detail and generally everything else that can go wrong with a HD transfer.

If you want this digibook, go for the American version (which is region free). Alternatively, go for the US 100th Anniversary release in the standard plastic case - it's cheaper and the digibook packaging doesn't offer much beyond looking nice.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Same very poor quality as the previous version, 24 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Although I bought the old edition in the past, I've recently purchased this 100th Anniversary Edition
I've realized to my great disappointment that it offers the same identical very poor quality as the copy I already have!
I know that Universal spent its effort to have a new master copy for the US with a much enhanced picture quality.
I really can't understand why giving again a very poor transfer to all the European countries.
With the label "100th Anniversary Edition", you let the customers think that the European edition uses the same master copy used in the United States - because it is also called "100th Anniversary Edition" - but unfortunately that's not true at all!!!

Sure of your seriousness already shown in the case of "The Gladiator" rest in confident expectation that you will soon start a replacement campaign to fix this embarrassing problem.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible video quality...., 28 Dec 2012
Universal UK have decided to use the old bluray transfer in this digibook, and not the newer remastered version that was re-released in the US (The 1st US bluray release was also the same problematic transfer as this UK current release). Even the newer remastered version is not perfect- that tells you right there how poor this one is. Avoid, avoid, avoid!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor transfer, 4 April 2011
By 
M. Hafner (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Out of Africa [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This Blu Ray sports a very outdated HD transfer that is poor for today's standards. Digital sharpening and grain reduction artifacts are all over the place. Film look is not available here. You might like it if you watch on smaller TVs from a safe distance (where you don't see 1080p detail in the first place). Don't try to project it on a screen or go to close on a big monitor. It miserably falls apart.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


71 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A song of Africa; and: What price freedom?, 2 Jun 2005
By 
Themis-Athena (from somewhere between California and Germany) - See all my reviews
He likes to distill his movies' themes into a single word, Sydney Pollack explains on "Out of Africa"'s DVD. Here, that word is "Possession:" The possessiveness of the colonialists trying to make Africa theirs; to rule her with their law, settle on the local tribes' land, dress their African servants in European outfits (complete with a house boy's white gloves), import prized belongings like crystal to maintain the comforts of European civilization, and teach African children to read, to remove their "ignorance." And the possessiveness of human relationships; the claim of exclusivity arising from a wedding license, the encroachment on personal freedom resulting if such a claim is raised by even one partner - regardless whether based on a legal document - and the implications of desire, jealousy, want and need.
As such, the movie's story of Danish writer Karen Blixen's (Isak Dinesen's) experience in Kenya is inextricably intertwined with her love for free-spirited hunter/adventurer Denys Finch Hatton. Just as she spends years trying to wrangle coffee beans from ground patently unfit for their plantation and create a dam where water that, her servants tell her, "lives in Mombassa" needs to flow freely, only to see her efforts fail at last, so also her romance with Finch Hatton blossoms only as long as she is still (pro forma) married, and thus cannot fully claim him. As soon as the basis of their relationship changes, Finch Hatton withdraws - and is killed in a plane crash shortly thereafter, his death thus cementing a development already underway with terrible finality. In her eulogy Karen asks God to take back his soul with its freedom intact: "He was not ours - he was not mine." Yet, both Kenya and Finch Hatton leave such a mark on her that, forced to return to Denmark, she literally writes them back into her life; again becoming the "mental traveler" she had been before first setting foot on African soil, using her exceptional storytelling powers to resurrect the world and the man she lost, and be united with them in spirit where a more tenable union is no longer possible.
While "Out of Africa" is an adaptation of Blixen's like-named ode to Kenya, several of her other works also informed the screenplay; as did Judith Thurman's Blixen biography. And it's this combination which in screenwriter Carl Luedtke' and director Sydney Pollack's hands turns into gold where prior attempts have failed; because Blixen's book is primarily, as Pollack explains, "a pastorale, a beautifully formed memoir [relying] on her prose style, her sense of poetry and her ability to discover large truths in very small ... details" but lacking "much narrative drive" and thus, "difficult to translate to film." In addition, Blixen was largely silent about her relationship with Finch Hatton, which however was an essential element of the story, thus dooming any attempt to produce a movie without extensive prior research into this area.
Meryl Streep was not Sydney Pollack's first choice for the role of Karen, for which luminaries including Greta Garbo and Audrey Hepburn had previously been considered. Looking back in the DVD's documentary, Streep and Pollack recount how his change of mind came about (and ladies, I just know her version will make you laugh out loud). But while unfortunately neither her Oscar- nor her Golden-Globe-nomination turned into one of the movie's multiple awards (on Oscar night alone, Best Movie, Best Director and Best Cinematography, Art Direction, Music and Sound), she was indeed the perfect choice. Few contemporary actresses have her range of talent and sensitivity; and listening to tapes of Blixen reading her own works allowed her not only to develop a Danish accent but to become the story's narrative voice in the completest sense, from Blixen's persona to her perceptions and penmanship.
Much has been made of the fact that as Finch Hatton no British actor was cast but Robert Redford, with whom Pollack had previously collaborated in five successful movies, including the mid-1970s' "The Way We Were" and "Three Days of the Condor." But as Pollack points out, Finch Hatton, although a real enough person in Karen Blixen's life, in the movie's context stands for the universal type of the charming, ever-unpossessable, mysterious male; and there simply is no living actor whose image matches that type as closely as Redford's. Indeed, in this respect his character in "Out of Africa" epitomizes his "Redfordness" more intensely than *any* of his other roles. Moreover, all references to Finch Hatton's nationality are deleted here; so this isn't Robert Redford trying to portray a member of the English upper class, this is Redford portraying Redford (or at least, his public image) - and therefore, it is only proper that he didn't adopt a British accent, either.
Praise for this movie wouldn't be complete without mentioning the splendid, Golden-Globe-winning performance of Klaus-Maria Brandauer, one of today's best German-speaking actors, in the role of Karen's philandering husband Bror. (And if you think he's duplicitous here, rent such gems as "Mephisto" and "Hanussen" - or, for that matter, "James Bond: Never Say Never Again" - and you'll see what creepy and demonic really is when it's grown up). And of course, "Out of Africa" wouldn't be what it is without its superb African cast members; particularly Malick Bowens as Karen's faithful major domus Farah and Joseph Thiaka in his only known screen appearance as Kamante, Karen's indomitable cook. Several fine British actors complete the cast, providing enough British colonial feel even for those quibbling with Redford's casting; to name but a few, Michael Kitchen as Finch Hatton's friend Berkeley Cole, Michael Gough as Lord "Dee" Delamere and Suzanna Hamilton as Felicity (whose character is based on Blixen's friend and rival for Finch Hatton's attentions, Beryl Markham).
In all, "Out of Africa" is a grand, lavishly produced tribute to Africa, nature, freedom, adventure and love: Karen Blixen's "Song of Africa" brought to the big screen - and one of the profoundest love stories ever written by life itself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beware of this UK release, 9 July 2012
By 
SJT (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Out of Africa [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The American original edition from 2010 from which this mastering was taken was so poorly done, and caused so much consumer upset there, that - just as with Gladiator - Universal has remastered the film and reissued it this year. But unlike Gladiator, there has been no recall programme, and buyers of the UK edition are left to fend for themselves, whereas in America the pressings have already been replaced, and the film is currently available as a digibook (like The Sting and Pillow Talk) which unfortunately shows no sign of appearing here. The upscaled DVD actually looks better than the badly-processed blu-ray still being sold in the UK without warning.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning!, 30 Jun 2005
By A Customer
This is my all time favourite film. The film is heartfelt, touching, sometimes gritty but utterly faboulous depiction of Africa of it's time. The whole film revolves around the stunning scenery and pastures that is Africa at it's finest - think 'Born Free'. The soundtrack lifts the film and pays the scenery the ultimate compliment. The acting and costumes are superb and the enigmatic and interesting character of Karen Blixen who falls in and out of good and bad luck and finds love finally with her unlikely hero, the dust coated Robert Redford. If you love a romantic yet factual drama with some of the best shots of Africa you can almost smell the heat - then this film is for you. :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning film in every respect!, 5 Dec 2002
This is one of my all-time favourite movies, and one I can watch over and over again. Meryl Streep and Robert Redford are perfectly cast, and play their characters so convincingly that it is easy to forget you are watching a film! Of course the film is based on Karen Blixen's true experiences, however don't expect it to be like her book of the same name, as the film takes its content from a number of other sources too. Specifically, Karen Blixen's 'Shadows on the Grass' and 'Letters from Africa', Judith Thurman's book 'Isak Dinesen: The Life of a Storyteller' (also published as 'Isak Dinesen: The Life of Karen Blixen'), and Errol Trzebinski's 'Silence Will Speak'.
The film itself contains panoramic views of Africa, has a beautiful score, and is a joyous story of a woman's passion, courage, determination, and love - both of Africa and its people, and for Denys Finchatten. It is also a film tinged with sadness, but it cannot help but leave you with a profound sense of what life is all about, and perhaps even inspire you to fulfill your own destiny.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good: Beautifully shot love story replete w Lions, 10 Dec 2000
By A Customer
...It is long, but beautifully shot, with wonderful music and photography throughout. Streep and Redford are marvelous in their roles. I have enjoyed this movie many times over the years - it's the kind of thing you can watch again and again. However, I do recommend having a box of tissues handy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Out Of Africa [DVD] [1986]
Out Of Africa [DVD] [1986] by Sydney Pollack (DVD - 2002)
£4.81
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews