Customer Reviews


162 Reviews
5 star:
 (78)
4 star:
 (41)
3 star:
 (23)
2 star:
 (11)
1 star:
 (9)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good and highly entertaining.
Hype as ever follows any film expected and/or actually winning Oscars, Baftas and other awards. Often the critically acclaimed are not as popular with the public, but this film truly deserves all the praise and awards it received.

We all know the story; Dianna dies in a car crash and the public grief the entire country showed while the royals stayed largely...
Published on 16 Jun 2007 by Mr. Andrew Moore

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice acting, quite good film
Helen Mirren's acting is indeed good, though she comes across as far more charismatic than the real Elisabeth.

I was imagining it would give more of an insight into the whole life of the Queen and was a little disappointed. Nevertheless, by concentrating on one episode (the aftermath of Diana's death) the film is able to go quite deeply into her feelings (in an...
Published on 29 Mar 2007 by Rabscuttlerun


‹ Previous | 1 2 317 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

80 of 87 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monarchy stripped, 3 Jan 2007
By 
I. Curry "IDC" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
It is unlikely that any single person is as omnipresent through one's lifetime as an iconoic and long lived monarch. In Britain no one under the age of 55 has known any other head of state, and even in our disrespectful, celebrity driven culture she still enjoys a personal popularity and visual presence that is almost unique.

Her face smiles benevolently from stamps, stares imperiously from bank notes and is stamped on every coin. Letter boxes, pillars and buildings are decorated with her E II R cipher, and the initials `HM' or `royal' precede almost every national institution. From the RAF to HM Government, from the Queen's Speech to those resting at her majesty's pleasure, Elizabeth is everywhere.

And so the spectacle of a film that attempts to accurately and without sensation reveal the inner workings of her family life and mind is undoubtedly one of the cinematic events to be relished in Britain. And with Helen Mirren taking the lead and making the role so sublimely successful, this film is a definite winner.

It could have been the time, just after lunch in a mid-week showing. It could have been the location, genteel Clapham. But it was more likely to be the film, and its royal subject matter. The Queen is one of the first films I have seen where the pensionable audience was dominant and where octogenarians were a visible minority. And, it seem obvious to say, they were all women. As the strains of `Don't Cry for me, Argentina, blasted through the auditorium, the discrete chatter of the royal watching crowd could be heard.

The pre-movie hype was, like the crowd, discrete. The articles focused on Helen Mirren, and dealt with how the evident lese-majeste would be received in Buckingham Palace. The film itself was received with something of a mystery. I knew it focused on the weeks surrounding the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, but beyond that I was in the dark.

But the film did not disappoint. The spectacle of a famously private monarch being brought to life in telling detail was intriguing. The role was played with a dry, waspish sense of humour throughout. The Queen was demonstrated as being rational, honour and duty bound and sensible. Her only failing seems to have been to fail to read the mood of a strangely hysterical public, and by the end this seems to be as much a reason for praise as anything. When an annoyingly `in-touch' Tony Blair tells Her Maj that an appearance might help the people with their grief, the Queen almost splutters back in disbelief "their grief?"

It is this divorce from the people at this point that is the central theme of the film. It is the first time she is hated, criticised and subject to the harsh blast of sustained tabloid fury. And Helen Mirren plays the resulting hurt and confused monarch with aplomb. It is one of her finest dramatic moments.

But it is the joy of watching the private moments that could be so easily believed to be real that makes the film. The Queen is a stickler for protocol. Tony Blair is introduced by the Queen's private secretary as the Prime Minister, and the Queen replies quickly "Prime Minister to be, Robin, to be. I haven't asked him yet". Cherie is well played as the frumpy, republican rebel with a devilish wit that is so easy to believe. Blair is similarly convincing as both the poster child of modernity and then the Queen's defender within government. Alistair Campbell is creepily obsessed with the public image and the spin machine that will later consume him.

Most enjoyable is the Duke of Edinburgh, who in real life can always be relied on to provide a comedy aside. He spends most of the film either away hunting, or spluttering in disbelieving indignation at the latest affront from the government or media. His best line comes in relaying the latest invitation list to the funeral, "a chorus line of soap stars and homosexuals!" And propping up the royal comedy double act is the Queen Mother, as similarly wry as her daughter but yet charmingly dotty with age.

The setting is stunning, with most of the action taking place in the Queen's estate in Balmoral. The hunt scenes present an interesting allegory, with Diana, the namesake of the goddess of the hunt, hunted down to eventual death by the press, and her boys taken on a real hunt to get their minds off it. A giant stag becomes something of a metaphor for the dead princess, beautiful and yet ultimately tragic. In the end, just like the princess, it is in the wrong place at the wrong time and meets a bloody end.

Ultimately this film is far from the caustic attack on the royals I was expecting. The characters are played with attention and sympathy. I can't see that any would have much to complain about in their portrayal. In fact the biggest villains are seen to be the British people, who collectively lose their minds in a display of mass grief that is barely comprehensible. That they forced their stoic, dutiful Queen to grieve in public is one of the most reprehensible episodes in what is ultimately a tragic tale of a family playing out its differences in public and grieving in the only way they know how - in private.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A historical moment in time from a different perspective, 10 Jun 2007
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
We are eased into the story as we watch a well paced installation of Tony Blair (Michael Sheen, who really looks more like Tim Curry) as Great Britain's Prime Minister. Then we dive right into the death of Lady Di with actual news footage in a sound bite format.

The Story is a clash between the "traditional" attitude of the Queen, HM Queen Elizabeth II (Helen Mirren) and her immediate family with a more "modernized" view of the Prime Minister and his advisers on how the death should be handled.

There are many underlying factors that are well balanced in this movie with out changing the pathos to a monolog documentary. The addition of a stag being brought down by a clumsy paying guest on a neighboring estate can be both a metaphor and at the same time give the Queen a more-than-meets-the-eye appearance.

It is redressing to get a different perspective on the incident. As the Queen states," There has been a shift in values."

I think the producers chose the actors wisely; I especially approve of the choice of Helen Mirren. I first saw her in Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" 1968 and she has played progressively more important roles to mature to this role and hopefully beyond.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully made and well acted., 25 May 2007
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
I am an ardent royalist, and therefore I initially found it a little unsettling that there should be a film made about Her Majesty while she is still alive. I also assumed that, as is the fashion, the film would be very pro-Diana and take the opportunity to caricature the Royal Family. However, having seen little clips of the film from when it was winning lots of awards, I became curious about whether I had misjudged it.

I'm happy to say I had it wrong on all counts. What a beautifully crafted film. The stunning landscapes of Scotland were amazing to see, especially juxtaposed with the political machinations going on in London. All credit to the actors too. Dame Helen Mirren is an absolutely outstanding actress, totally convincing as The Queen, and fully deserving of the Best Actress Oscar. The supporting cast managed to sympathetically portray their characters without resorting to simple mimicry. A delicate subject was treated well with no bias towards either side.

This film is in turns amusing, thought-provoking and moving. I would recommend it to anyone, regardless of their views on the monarchy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really interesting and non-biased, 24 April 2007
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
This film is fantastic. It covers the events that occured at the time and you feel as though you are being told what happened but you are not pushed in any direction. You are not forced to see events from any particular point of view, rather you feel as though you are being given an insight into the side of the story the press didn't cover, i.e. the family wanting to grieve with dignity and in peace and to have the opportunity to look after two young boys who suddenly lost their mum, and not make a public show of themselves.

If you are looking for an anti-royal film this isn't it. Nor is it pro. The only people that come across badly in this film are Cherie Blair and the press. The acting is wonderful and I have to say that all credit goes to 'Tony Blair' who managed to capture the PM's characteristics without exaggeration or mockery- no mean feat when he is the subject of many comedians routines and mimics. Buy it. Watch it. Love it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Richly deserved Oscar for Dame Helen, 29 Mar 2007
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
This is a must-see film for anyone with an interest in recent history, politics or just British cinema. Helen Mirren was as believable as ever as were most of the rest of the cast.

Even die-hard republicans would be hard-pressed not to feel a lump in the throat during parts of this compelling portrayal of the days after Diana's death. Just don't expect an in-depth analysis of any conspiracy theories.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A simple and incisive piece of filmwork, 27 Jun 2008
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
I originally had no intentions of watching this film let alone buying it, but then I got curious, so I picked it up for a couple of pounds.

I'm very pleased that I did, I think this gives a very good account of what happened or what may have happened in the aftermath of the death of Princess Diana.

There are excellent portrayals of The Queen (Dame Helen Mirren), Prince Phillip (James Cromwell) and Tony Blair (Michael Sheen), strangely enough there is very little screen time given to Prince Charles, which I found a little strange.

I was never a great fan of Princess Diana, nor for that matter Tony Blair, although it does not harp on about how "wonderful" Princess Diana was, it does grind on me a bit how much they appear to credit Blair as if everything that was handled well was down to him sticking his nose in to that was none of his business, mind you he was always very good at that, so I can quite believe that he did make a nuisance of himself toward the Royal family.

I can well believe that both The Queen and Prince Phillip were sick and tired of Blairs constant interference and pestering too.

Overall though a great effort that tends not preach, but attempts to give a good account of what was happening in the country at that time, I think they succeed in doing this very well indeed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb viewing whether or not it is not 100% factual, 18 July 2007
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
I wasn't sure whether I even wanted to see this film, since I already knew 'the plot' and like many people I am 'Dianaed-out'. But having convinced myself to see it because of it starring Oscar-winning Helen Mirren, I found it one of the most engaging movies I have seen in a very long while.
The characterisation / acting is brilliant - interpretations rather than caricatures of the key players, with some marvellous throwaway lines (especially by the Queen Mother and Prince Philip). Helen Mirren stars but everyone is outstandingly good.
However imaginary or close to the fact it really is in depicting events in the week of the Princess's death, it is satisfactorily plausible throughout and certainly led me to change my perceptions of some people, while endorsing those of others.
The locations, albeit reportedly put together on a shoestring, are gorgeous and quite brilliantly intercut with news footage. The portrayal of life in the palace(s) c.f. life at no. 10 is amusing in its contrast but I suspect frighteningly accurate.
See it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not sure about reality but a really good film, 6 July 2007
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
A very well written and acted film with Helen Mirren superbly carrying off her portrayal of the Queen. The viewer can chuckle at the comments made by the Queen about The Blairs and only wonder how close to the truth this film came! A bit like a fly on the wall - but fiction. An enjoyable film which gives an interesting interpretation of that week in which the Royal Family seemed to go into hiding.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely entralling, 28 Jun 2007
By 
S. Gross "Sam Gross" (Ammanford, Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
I'd heard a lot of good things about this, and read a lot of cracking reviews, but still wasn't sure about watching it. After all, I didn't have a lot of time for the whole Diana funeral at the time that it happened - considering it to be a load of unnecessary mass-hysteria and therefore wasn't sure whether I would enjoy it. However, I found it absolutely entralling, especially the relationship between the Queen and Tony Blair. It showed a lot about that week that was often forgotten in the hysteria surrounding Diana's death and how genuinely the Queen thought she was doing the 'right' thing, according to the traditions of the Royal Family. Contrast that with the 'moderniser' Blair and the 'manipulative' Campbell, brilliant!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mirren deserves her Oscar, 1 May 2007
This review is from: The Queen [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
The 20th Century was full of historical events that remain in our memory.For example, the assassination of JFK, the D Day landings, the Falklands War and the Coronation of the Queen rank very highly in this selective list. Yet, the most memorable of the lot by far was the death of Princess Diana. It happened at a time when telecommunication facilities were abound, and the outpouring of grief as witnessed by the local, cable and satellite TV channels was unprecedented. Moreover, the Internet was coming out of its infancy and ready for mass market use.

I felt that the above paragraph was essential to appreciate this film. Helen Mirren portrays Queen Elizabeth II magnificently. The little tics, subtle references to the confidence of newly elected Prime Minister Blair couldn't have been done by another actress though Meryl Streep (with heavy make up) may have been a remote replacement.

This film excels because it shows the British character from the proletariat (in the crowds outside Buckingham Palace) right up to royalty. The Queen at first is quite reticent to acknowledge that Princess Diana's death should be a royal issue. She does realize that her position is of utmost responsibility borne or rather thrust to her by virtue of her royal lineage and respect of tradition. IN this film, we see two faces of royalty or rather two and a half (the half being the Queen). Stephen Cromwell as Prince Phillip displays the austere aloof side (who rather go hunting than share the public grief). This is shared by Helen Mccrory as the Queen Mother who is even more traditional.

The other side is represented by Prince Charles who is determined to give a modern face to the monarchy without alienating it from the public. He realizes that he has an uphill struggle. No one is bigger than an institution especially the monarchy.Anyway, the subtleness of Micheal Sheen who portrays Tony Blair is very evident and he eventually gets his way. He is the recipient of a very witty quip; SO if I'm still popular as the Queen, you are even more popular as the Prime Minister.

Another angle is provided by the entourage of PM Blair, especially his spin doctor Alastair Campbell - he is so determined to iron out an image of Blair as the guy who penned the title of People's Princess to honour the deceased Princess Diana.in the end, he gets sucked in by the very whirlwind that he created..remember no one is bigger than the institution..brilliantly depicted in a scene where Blair lays a vitriolic attack on Campbell for overtly criticizing the Queen at any opportune moment.

Great Film..Classic and advisable to watch the extras first.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 317 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Queen [DVD] [2006]
The Queen [DVD] [2006] by Stephen Frears (DVD - 2007)
£3.00
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews