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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most Accessible Rush Album
This was the album that got me into Rush. When I first heard it as a newbie drummer and musician it blew me away. This is the epitome of the bass and drums working together in the most groovy and funky way that any rush album has ever had before or since. Time stands still being my favorite song lyrically, especially having just turned 30 it has special meaning. This is...
Published on 24 May 2001 by Andrews Voice

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars time standing still
Apart from the first three tracks this is possibly the most unremarkable Rush album,even Alex Lifeson rates it poorly.This is an album driven by a band trapped in their 80's phase,each album now becoming interchangeable with the one before,identity lost,previous albums stood on their own,again marvel at the musicianship,pine for the lost soul of the band...
Published on 25 Sep 2010 by Mr Blackwell


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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most Accessible Rush Album, 24 May 2001
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
This was the album that got me into Rush. When I first heard it as a newbie drummer and musician it blew me away. This is the epitome of the bass and drums working together in the most groovy and funky way that any rush album has ever had before or since. Time stands still being my favorite song lyrically, especially having just turned 30 it has special meaning. This is easily the most user friendly Rush album but musically and technically astounding at the same time. This rates as one of my favorite albums of all time. A true masterpiece!!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exhilarating, transcendent, upbeat, melodic prog-metal, 28 Dec 2004
By 
Tim Burness (Brighton, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
I love mid-eighties period Rush! I have returned to this album again and again since its release in 1987 and it still sets my soul on fire. The music and lyrics are intelligent, passionate and full of enthusiasm and wonder for life. Every track oozes with the quality musicianship that this band has been associated with at all stages of their career. Fantastically inspirational.

Three stunning musicians with open minds, open hearts, a ton of awareness, expressing dynamic creativity of the highest order. Great songs, great eighties production with just the right sprinkling of accomplished guitar solos and atmospheric keyboards. The lyrics are deeply personal, socially aware, and often highly emotional. And they were obviously enjoying themselves!

By this album Rush had taken a more melodic approach and added keyboards to their earlier Zeppelinesque metal sound, apparently losing many fans in the process. For me "Hold Your Fire" is the best of their excellent eighties albums that have stood the test of time. "Power Windows" is also superb, but "Hold Your Fire" is a bit sharper.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still Holding Fire, 14 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
If there is one band on the planet who have consistently over-played and under-performed, it's Rush. Rush fans love everything they do, whilst no-one else cares. Both these statements may be harsh, but why is it that such a great band is either worshipped, maligned or simply ignored? OK, they do tend to go overboard, but I can't understand why bands as diverse as the Police and Van Halen were household names in the eighties, yet Rush never were. Perhaps they seemed too aloof...
This set, which starts off brightly enough but tails off towards the end, is a perfect example. The songs contain a couple of nods to their dodgy prog past and the lyrics are to Peart's usual high(er-than-thou) standard. The production is as clear as a whistle, but you get the idea that Rush never really let go on this one. The guitars are a little more upfront than on their preceding five studio albums and that's what saves this album in the end. The lyrics to Tai Shan - why! On the other extreme, Time Stand Still and Prime Mover are great - eighties Rush at their best. They are capable of doing anything they want musically, but never managed to fire on all cylinders from about 1982 onwards. However, an average album by this band is still a great one, and that's why it warrants 4 out of 5.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesomeness, 26 Nov 2012
By 
Ms. C. Morgan (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (MP3 Download)
I have been a major fan of this band since I can remember. My cousin brought 2112 home when I was like 10 years old or something and I was hooked. Unlike many bands they embraced the whole MIDI/synthesis/sequencing vibe of the 80s and made it an integral part of the RUSH vibe. They are the masters of taking styles, genres and technologies and making them RUSH - perhaps they are BORG after all and if that's the case then fine, assimilate me guys!

This album... is one of my favourites if not indeed my favourite. It certainly includes several of my favourite RUSH songs of which MISSION is a work of pure and unadulterated genius.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open Secrets, 29 May 2011
By 
G. Young (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
Hold Your Fire (or 'The Red Album' as I have fondly come to think of it over the years) is a rich, exciting record that, to a certain extent at least, finalised the experimental synthesizer period of Rush's career, in that the keyboards were used as a multi-layered textural device that was now a huge part of the Rush sound, although they had been using synthesizers as early as their classic 2112 album. Whilst it may not be as well produced as the exquisite Power Windows, this album holds some of their finest work - Time Stand Still, Prime Mover, Open Secrets and Mission. And yet, it is worth mentioning that there is not a single bad track to be found on Hold Your Fire, it is a very complete sounding piece of work. Some of it is uniquely experimental, the gentle sophistication of Tai Shan for instance, whilst the closing track sounds vast, exotic, almost overwhelming, the ancient yearnings of deep memory that reside in our primeval instinct to be found within the oceanic, High Water.

There is some room for improvement within the sharp and 'thin' production treatment given, unlike the huge and full bodied sound of Power Windows (a personal favourite of mine) however, there is no denying the quality of the songs. It is probably best listened to on vinyl, for a richer, warmer, more 'red' sound, although the remaster can sound quite pristine on a decent sound system, add a touch of extra bass for punch if you have tone controls on your amplifier.

Neil Peart displays a somewhat more open and personal approach to the lyrics than usual (at least at this point in his writing career...) on songs that deal primarily with emotion, power and also with the passage of time. The best example of this approach can be found within the wonderful Open Secrets and for me, this song features one of Alex Lifeson's most emotive and evocative guitar solos. It reminds me of a wild, haunted wind, pining and lonely, blowing through the leaves of trees on a hot summer's night. Indeed the whole album invokes a sense of deep red within me, of an evening at the height of summer, when the sky is crimson, almost bloody in its look and feel, a dark red that will soon turn to black as the first chill of the evening descends from green, lush hills and the air is hot and sweet. Geddy Lee's pulsating bass work during Open Secrets is also a thing of rare, moving beauty.

Prime Mover is classic Rush, a complex framework of rhythms that stop and start, stop and start - 'the point of the needle, moving back and forth...' The music and lyrics are moving forward, in a fundamentally optimistic view and attitude that informs the listener that 'anything can happen.' This song is one of the reasons that I love Rush so much, it is at once outward looking and introspective, an echo of the sentiment within opening track Force Ten - 'Look in - look out - look around.' It is complex yet accessible, joyous in its statement of intent - '...thrill to be alive - the point of the journey, is not to arrive...'

Mission illustates perfectly just how accomplished Neil Peart had become at blending electronic percussion into his acoustic drumming, the middle section is nothing short of stunning, the mechanics of which can be seen in startling splendour on the Snakes and Arrows Live DVD, which for me holds the definative version of this song, also worth looking out for is Alex Lifeson's electric, searing solo during the end section, which simply shakes with emotion and you can see just how much he enjoys playing live. I read once that there is a version of Mission Rush recorded with Peter Collins that features a brass band, I really hope they release that version one day.

Time Stand Still is another standout track, warm and quietly haunting, with some beautiful backing vocals from Aimee Man that fit the mood of the song perfectly. Neil Peart's drum pattern during the chorus never fails to please me with its pin-point precision and constantly shifting rhythms. There are some subtle, contemplative lyrics during the song, contained within the verse -

'I turn my face to the sun,
Close my eyes,
Let my defences down -
All those wounds that I can't get unwound...'

Again, here is a track that is at once both introspective and outward looking -

'Time stand still -
I'm not looking back
But I want to look around me now.'

The final song that Rush wrote for the album is also the opening track, Force Ten. It starts with treated vocals and electronic drumming that sounds like a pneumatic drill before giving way to an urgent, busy bassline and driving snare drum pattern that carry us off into the journey of Hold Your Fire. It is a rich, rewarding experience that I find myself returning to, sometimes when there is a warm wind in the evening, the trees sway and late summer turns everything to a soft, bloody red and slowly, the first dark creeping tendrils of colour begin to float into the sky. By midnight the moon rides high over metallic cloud and the night sky holds its own circle of brilliant white fire.
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5.0 out of 5 stars 80's Rock Rush Style!, 8 Jun 2014
By 
trebor (Leicestershire UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
Synth's and electronic drum/percussion tended to dominate the Rush sound in the 80's and this is the case here, but the quality of song-writing and musicianship means that this album hasn't dated too badly at all. I remember being a little disappointed at the time of release but this has become one of my favourite Rush albums mainly down to the strong set of songs here. I always feel that seeing the songs performed live makes a huge difference to how you feel about an album too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars good buy, 12 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
good buy happy with the music five star worth every penny great tracks good rush album would tell a friend
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4.0 out of 5 stars Rush & Hold you're fire,, 28 April 2014
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
Rush released Hold your fire in 1987 and it comes after the truly classic Power windows two years previously. Out of all the albums released during the eighties synth period, I find this one the weakest; but there is still alot of enjoyment to be found on this pleasant CD. "Force Ten" is a disturbingly outstanding start, and it paves the way for some really spine-tingling moments and great atmosphere. For a Rush album there is an unusually strong prevailance of "poppy" rock sufficed by a strong undercurrent of accessibility. Needless to say that the songwriting always remains tight and quintessentially Rush despite.

10 tracks grace the CD with a unison of friendly, and albeit, keyboard-saturated sounds. Hold your fire is certainly an album of it's time. The production deep and passionate reflects a constantly shifting and enveloping atmosphere. "Time stand still, Second Nature and Prime Mover" are exceedingly likeable Rush numbers, and are almost certainly geared for hit material. Elsewhere, "Open Secrets and Lock and Key" are keyboard driven affairs with a really soul inspiring theme. "Turn the page and The mission" are simply another crop of enjoyable and catchy arrangements of pop rock; and then there is other unusual pieces such as the chinese inspired "Tai shan", to be finally closed by the undeniable brilliance of "High water".

It would have been nice to see a little more in the way of classic Rush prowess and emphasis. However there's enough timeless songs, well executed musicianship and a focused songwriting to make this a nearly unmissable Rush album.,
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5.0 out of 5 stars A shakey first listen, but ends brilliantly!, 13 April 2014
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
I had only just got into Rush and had bought 2112, A Farewell to Kings and Moving Pictures. A friend of mine bought me this as a present and at first I just hated it, however after several listens it has become my favourite album to listen to when I just want to relax, pass a bus ride or something. I highly recommend! It is different but in a good way in my books! Time Stand Still, Force Ten and Tai Shan being my top 3 in the album but everything else is up there! I can see why Rush fans are so loyal to this amazing band! In the end it has definately made me a loyal fan!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Slick 80s Rock, 10 Nov 2013
This review is from: Hold Your Fire (Audio CD)
A friend of mine bought this album on cassette and played it one Saturday in 1987. It was the Rush album that got me away from the pop music that dominated the charts and it introduced me to an altogether different style of music.
Rush don't stick with a winning style and flog it to death which,together with their close relationship, is why they have endured for so long, fans come and go but Rush keep moving on and developing music which first and foremost appeals to them.
Now, I won't say this is the album to get you in to Rush, that's what best of's are for, but this album is slick, easy on the ears, it features sharp attacking guitar riffs, punchy bass lines and complex drumming, one moment they massage, the next they assault your senses.
Hold Your Fire is a radio friendly mix of high energy rock with Force Ten and Turn The Page, soothing tones with Tai Shan and Second Nature and features Til Tuesday's Aimee Mann on vocals on the track Time Stand Still (covered by Nelly Furtado), something which was a new direction for the band.
Why buy this? Simply put, it's ace.
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Hold Your Fire
Hold Your Fire by Rush (Audio CD - 2012)
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