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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tora Tora Tora Blu-ray Extras
I would full heatedly agree with the other very favourable reviews of both content and picture quality. No one seems to have mentioned that on the Blu-ray there is an excellent collection of ten short Fox Movietonews Items. The documentary 'A day of Infamy' which was on the DVD is also included. Also 'History vs Hollywood Tora Tora Tora A giant Awakes' and 'AMC Backstory'...
Published on 4 Feb 2011 by David Welford

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars great film average blueray
one of my top 5 war films have watched this many times on dvd.
bought blue ray as stated before good extras picture quality is ok a bit grainy when planes take off at dawn to attack.
sound is good great value at two for 15 but not worth full price if you already have dvd.
produced by same people who made longest day
it was made in 1970 but compared to...
Published on 13 Mar 2011 by B. R. Allison


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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tora Tora Tora Blu-ray Extras, 4 Feb 2011
By 
David Welford (Essex England) - See all my reviews
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I would full heatedly agree with the other very favourable reviews of both content and picture quality. No one seems to have mentioned that on the Blu-ray there is an excellent collection of ten short Fox Movietonews Items. The documentary 'A day of Infamy' which was on the DVD is also included. Also 'History vs Hollywood Tora Tora Tora A giant Awakes' and 'AMC Backstory' which tell of the making of and that for once how the American Studio tried to truthfully recreate what had actually happened rather than pervert the path of truth to show how heroic and single handed Americans had won the last war. You have to remember that this film was made before the days of CGI and real planes were built specially for the film. The next evening after watching Tora Tora Tora I watched 'Pearl Harbour',it's too much love story /relationships and though the attack on Pearl Harbour is more dramatic, is does rather look like an arcade game! Highly recommended to those who like the film and worth the upgrade from DVD especially for the very interesting extras.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.", 30 Nov 2007
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
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20th Century Fox's genuinely spectacular account of the attack on Pearl Harbor told from both the American and Japanese viewpoints was in real terms an even bigger financial disaster for the studio than Cleopatra: even by latter-period roadshow standards, reminding American audiences of the incredible catalogue of blunders and incompetence that led to the Day of Infamy at a time when they were in the midst of another war in Asia (and one that was not going well) seems like business decision making at its most kamikaze. The film has probably made more money out of being carved up for stock footage than it ever did in the cinema, featuring prominently in Midway, Pearl and both The Winds of War and War and Remembrance among others.

Like Cleopatra, it was a troubled production: Akira Kurosawa worked on the Japanese side of the film for months but delivered only one brief scene in the finished film before being replaced by two more special effects friendly directors (Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku) while on the American side Richard Fleischer relied on Ray Kellog and Robert Enrietto to shoot much of the spectacular finale.

From the last days when films were consciously visually designed for the Scope screen, it is mounted on a scale that would be inconceivable today - what Pearl Harbor did with CGi it did with real ships and aircraft - with a tight, focused script that dispenses with fictional sub-plots (no Ben Affleck winning the Battle of Britain single-handed here) in favour of absolute historical accuracy. Seen entirely from the military and political mindset, it has the edge on most cinematic exercises in battlefield history through the conviction of its direction, particularly the visually impressive Japanese sequences, and of its playing. With the exception of Soh Yamamura and E.G. Marshall, most of the top-liners are barely in the film, but the large ensemble cast copes surprisingly well with the task of having to embody attitudes and impart information rather than working on clearly defined characters, adding the colour as they find it in the gaps. Perhaps most surprising is the incredible degree of tension the film manages to achieve in the run-up to the attack despite the inevitability of the outcome. When it finally comes, the special effects are among the best ever seen on the screen. Jerry Goldsmith's score is also a major plus, relentlessly building menace and tension as the film races toward the inevitable.

While the previous DVD issue was pretty threadbare, this Cinema Reserve edition has a number of features covering both the making of the film and the real attack itself, although a 20-minute featurette from the first US DVD release but dropped from the original PAL release, Day of Infamy, has still not been included (it can be found on the US two-disc version, however).
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Blu-Ray, 7 Feb 2012
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I won't bother mentioning the content itself - you all already know it's the best film account of the attack on Pearl Harbour yet made.

What I will say is that this is an absolutely stunning Blu-Ray. If you want to count the individual rivets on the aircraft in the background of shot, or decide the quality of cotton used in a uniform, this is the edition for you. It is so crisp and detailed it is the closest thing to actually being on the set as they filmed it. I can't believe that sitting in a cinema with a virgin print on the first day of release you would have had a better picture.

I wish all Blu-Ray releases of classic war movies were like this one.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.", 25 Oct 2011
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
20th Century Fox's genuinely spectacular account of the attack on Pearl Harbor told from both the American and Japanese viewpoints was in real terms an even bigger financial disaster for the studio than Cleopatra: even by latter-period roadshow standards, reminding American audiences of the incredible catalogue of blunders and incompetence that led to the Day of Infamy at a time when they were in the midst of another war in Asia (and one that was not going well) seems like business decision making at its most kamikaze. The film has probably made more money out of being carved up for stock footage than it ever did in the cinema, featuring prominently in Midway, Pearl and both The Winds of War and War and Remembrance among others.

Like Cleopatra, it was a troubled production: Akira Kurosawa worked on the Japanese side of the film for months but delivered only one brief scene in the finished film before being replaced by two more special effects friendly directors (Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku) while on the American side Richard Fleischer relied on Ray Kellog and Robert Enrietto to shoot much of the spectacular finale.

From the last days when films were consciously visually designed for the Scope screen, it is mounted on a scale that would be inconceivable today - what Pearl Harbor did with CGi it did with real ships and aircraft - with a tight, focused script that dispenses with fictional sub-plots (no Ben Affleck winning the Battle of Britain single-handed here) in favour of absolute historical accuracy. Seen entirely from the military and political mindset, it has the edge on most cinematic exercises in battlefield history through the conviction of its direction, particularly the visually impressive Japanese sequences, and of its playing. With the exception of Soh Yamamura and E.G. Marshall, most of the top-liners are barely in the film, but the large ensemble cast copes surprisingly well with the task of having to embody attitudes and impart information rather than working on clearly defined characters, adding the colour as they find it in the gaps. Perhaps most surprising is the incredible degree of tension the film manages to achieve in the run-up to the attack despite the inevitability of the outcome. When it finally comes, the special effects are among the best ever seen on the screen. Jerry Goldsmith's score is also a major plus, relentlessly building menace and tension as the film races toward the inevitable.

Fox's Region A, B and C Blu-Ray offers both the 145-minute US version and the 149-minute Japanese version, which gives the main directorial credit to Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku and adds two scenes that really should have stayed in the international version: one a very solemn sequence where a minister prepares Admiral Yamamoto for a ritual meeting with the Emperor about the impending war all too aware that both men opposed it and are reluctant to fulfil their ceremonial roles while another features two Japanese galley cooks talking about crossing the international date line, the consequences of which only became clear in the aftermath of the attack. It also features all the extras from the two-disc DVD, including the Richard Fleischer/Stuart Galbreith audio commentary that isn't mentioned on the packaging and the historical featurette Day of Infamy that wasn't included on the international DVD releases as well as 91-minute and 22-minute documentaries on the making of the film, 10 Movietone newsreel extracts dealing with the attack and its aftermath, stills galleries and a fullframe theatrical trailer. It's easily the best home video presentation of the film to date.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Slow Moving Film With Great Special Effects, 23 Aug 2003
By 
Peter Kenney (Birmingham, Alabama, USA) - See all my reviews
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TORA,TORA,TORA is an entertaining movie for those who are interested in the history of World War II and particularly the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. It is mostly a slow moving film which finally explodes with vivid action scenes featuring excellent special effects. The large cast includes a mixture of American and Japanese actors led by Martin Balsam, Soh Yamamura, Joseph Cotton, Tatsuya Mihashi, E.G. Marshall and Takshiro Tamura.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The tragic and heroic elements of the Day of Infamy, 6 July 2004
By 
Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Tora! Tora! Tora! [1970] [DVD] (DVD)
"Tora! Tora! Tora!" is the story of the attack on Pearl Harbor as told from both the American and Japanese sides in almost a documentary style. The American segments were directed by Richard Fleischer while Kinji Fukasaku ended up replacing Akira Kurosawa for the Japanese segments. Both sides of the story are played out not so much by an all-star cast as a collection of some of these best character actors on both side of the Pacific: Martin Balsam, E.G. Marshall, Jason Robards on the one hand, Soh Yamamura, Tatsuya Mihashi and Takahino Tamura on the other.
The counter-point between the two sides of the story is quite effective, with the careful planning, preparation and execution of the attack by the Japanese contrasted with the chain of fatal mistakes made by the Americans. As a historical primer on the attack the film covers all of the excruciatingly painful details, from the radar operators dismissing the large incoming blip on their screens to General Marshall out riding his horse at the absolutely worst time, from a stubborn insistence upon "confirmation" of submarine sightings to the fumbling typist in the Japanese embassy trying frantically to complete his final message that must be delivered before the attack begins.
E. G. Marshall as Colonel Rufus G. Bratton gets the Cassandra role in this film, the intelligence officer convinced there is going to be an attack but who cannot get anyone to listen to him until it is too late. However, the film is so balanced in its presentation that you cannot help but feel for Ambassador Nomura, who misses the deadline and must still deliver the fatal letter to Secretary of State Cordell Hull. "Tora! Tora! Tora!" certainly achieved its goal of being a film that could be played in both countries without complaints from either side. I find it hard to believe that the upcoming theatrical release of "Pearl Harbor" would even come close to this standard.
This is the first film to focus primarily on the Pearl Harbor attack, with previous efforts using the battle as the start ("In Harm's Way") or the end ("From Here to Eternity") of a more personal journey. "Tora! Tora! Tora!" somewhat disproves the old adage, because not only does it show the "many fathers of success" on the Japanese side, it quite clearly refutes the idea "failure is an orphan" by laying the blame clearly on their American military counterparts.
This is by no means a controversial telling of the tale, so you will not find anything suggesting FDR knew about the attack and allowed it to make Americans angry enough to go to war. This is a film purporting to show "what really happened" and leaves notions of heroism up to the audience. In keeping with this approach, the importance of this particular moment in history is underscored not by angry Americans shouting "Remember Pearl Harbor!' but by Admiral Yamamoto's understatement: "I fear all we have down is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve."
Final note: Several stunt people were killed during the filming of "Tora! Tora! Tora!," and it is difficult to watch some of the stunts involving planes crashing into each other without wondering if what you are seeing is one of the stunts from which someone did not walk away. This is ironically appropriate given the film's subject matter.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece, 21 May 2011
By 
K. D. Cooper "ecola" (Adelaide, South Australia) - See all my reviews
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I had bought some time back the DVD version of this film. If I reviewed that I would have given 5 stars; but now that I have seen the Blue-ray I would have had to subtract a star from the DVD review. The difference in quality is amazing.

When I first saw the film, I had confidence in its content in that it was a joint American & Japanese production.

The story progresses in a steady way, with no distracting sub-plots. All the actors are at their best. You feel you are watching the very men they are representing. You can feel the frustration of Lt Col Bratton (E.G.Marshall)in his attempts to make his superiors see what was coming. But, of course, from their point of view, the idea of an attack from outside would have been thought impossible.

The actual bombing sequence is impressive.

An excellent film from start to finish. I am confident that what I have learned from this film is what happened on that day and what happened before.

David Cooper
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars great film average blueray, 13 Mar 2011
By 
B. R. Allison (uk) - See all my reviews
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one of my top 5 war films have watched this many times on dvd.
bought blue ray as stated before good extras picture quality is ok a bit grainy when planes take off at dawn to attack.
sound is good great value at two for 15 but not worth full price if you already have dvd.
produced by same people who made longest day
it was made in 1970 but compared to zulu no where as good quality.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive Pearl Harbor motion picture experience, 21 Aug 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tora! Tora! Tora! [1970] [DVD] (DVD)
Tora! Tora! Tora! remains an unprecedented motion picture achievement, a film presenting both sides of the attack on Pearl Harbor in a fact-based style rather than delving into such fictional storylines as star-crossed lovers for the heart of its presentation. In a very real way, it is two movies in one, with one production crew telling the Japanese side of the story and another telling the American side. All of the Japanese dialogue is subtitled in English, and this makes for a much more effective presentation than dubbing ever could. There are a good many important characters on each side, with each one identified at his first appearance, but the necessarily somewhat choppy style of presentation can make it difficult to keep different characters distinguished at times. The actors, for their part, are top-notch, with the American cast including such stalwarts as Jason Robards, Joseph Cotton, and E.G. Marshall. Soh Yamamura gives a powerful portrayal of Japanese Admiral Yamamoto, the man who is in many ways the centerpiece of this drama and the character on whom the filmmakers rely in presenting the real message they attempt to convey. While the diplomatic maneuvering and piling up of unforgivable American blunders in the weeks leading up to December 7, 1941, are quite interesting in and of themselves, it is the final 30-minute battle sequence that gives Tora! Tora! Tora! its real claim to fame. This movie was released in 1970, but the special effects rival if not surpass, at least in my opinion, anything you see filmmakers doing today. The explosions and carnage on the ground as well as the aerial maneuvers and dogfights in the air are just breathtakingly stunning. No film can ever recapture the depth and destruction of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, but this movie is really quite extraordinarily realistic in its presentation.
While this is a fact-based account of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, one cannot proclaim it historically complete and accurate. The Japanese, particularly in the person of Admiral Yamamoto, are presented in something of a sympathetic light. Certainly, there were elements in the Japanese military who disagreed with such a bold attack against a potentially overpowering enemy, but this movie seems to shy away from assigning blame for such a cowardly first strike against American forces in the Pacific. Certainly, there were diplomatic blunders that can explain Japan's violation of the Geneva Conventions but nevertheless such infamous things did happen. On the American side, one is treated to an infuriatingly long list of incompetent men, actions, and decisions. The blame for the disaster is spread widely as it should be, taking into account such matters as the incomprehensible decision of keeping all available planes parked closely together on the ground as well as the refusal of army brass in Washington to read signs that blazed as brightly as day from intercepted Japanese dispatches and warnings from a number of military and intelligence sources, but the movie never penetrates the doors of the White House to ask just what FDR knew and when he knew it, nor does it ask any questions at all of the British and the secret information Winston Churchill chose not to share with his American "ally." For me to criticize this movie for ignoring these most controversial issues back in 1970 is just minor quibbling, however, as I truly deem this film to be perhaps the most realistic and impressive war movie ever made. Its manner of presentation, dealing with events rather than central characters, is a weakness of sorts, one that saw it overshadowed in the year of its own release by George C. Scott's masterful portrayal of Patton, but clearly Tora! Tora! Tora! remains the definitive motion picture representation of the day that will live in infamy and the acts, decisions, and mistakes that led up to it.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth watching several times, 26 Oct 2003
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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Now that all the hoopla is over as to which is the best Pearl Harbor film we can concentrate on "Tora! Tora! Tora!" (1970) this recreation of the Day of Infamy.
Naturally there will always be those people that are not satisfied with the accuracy of this recreation. And there is the compromise of having both sides of the story in one film.
Other than a will paced film that keeps your attention, the real surprise is all the DVD goodies. The most important is the running narrative. It does some of the explaining of the differences between this film and reality without making excuses. After watching first with out the narrative, then with the narrative, it is time to watch it again and notice the points made on how the scenes were shot, the people picked and how they attempted to make the bulk of the film comply with history as we remember.
It does not make sense to repeat the narrative or the story in this review. Let's just say you will not be disappointed with the movie
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Tora! Tora! Tora! [1970] [DVD]
Tora! Tora! Tora! [1970] [DVD] by Toshio Masuda (DVD - 2001)
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