Customer Reviews


93 Reviews
5 star:
 (59)
4 star:
 (20)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Day of the Dead
What a film!!!!! The first scene where we get the first taste of the claustrophobic atmosphere that surrounds the film is brilliant. The scene makes you jump out of your seat and you know you're in for a movie that'll be full of surprises.
The film has plenty of clever dialogue and, of course, plenty of gore (thanks to the brilliant special effects and the make-up...
Published on 8 Dec 2004 by tubaroo

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great movie - Great Features - Okay release
I have this to say about it, from my perspective in the US.

1. Love the Bub Comic that comes with it
2. Love the Booklet
3. Love the Poster
4. Love the 4 new Covers
5. Love all the new Special Features and Extras on both discs

6. Do NOT love that Disc 2 was NOT region-free and I had to use my computer to view it.
7. Do NOT...
Published on 12 May 2011 by C. Chandler


‹ Previous | 1 210 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Day of the Dead, 8 Dec 2004
This review is from: Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986] (DVD)
What a film!!!!! The first scene where we get the first taste of the claustrophobic atmosphere that surrounds the film is brilliant. The scene makes you jump out of your seat and you know you're in for a movie that'll be full of surprises.
The film has plenty of clever dialogue and, of course, plenty of gore (thanks to the brilliant special effects and the make-up skills of Tom Savini) . It might not be as long or have as many gore scenes compared to the classic Dawn of the Dead but is still enjoyable and terrifying at the same time.
There is dialogue that will make you laugh or get you thinking philosophically and dialogue that will keep you guessing as to what might happen to the survivors in the film. The characters are cleverly drawn together and the zombies are scary looking, bar a few who look like they having a day out in the studio!
You'll be reaching for the sick bag when you see the gory scenes like the one where one of the characters gets his "chest-flesh" bitten off by a zombie; the flesh, as it is bitten off, looks like the stretchy cheese you see on a pizza that hangs on the side of your mouth! You'll see plenty of body parts torn apart and eaten and plenty of zombies that look like they seriously need to see their dentist, as well as their dermatologist!
Romero keeps you guessing as to who are the real bad guys (only one woman not a zombie in the film and she's a goodie!) and you only find out in the last few scenes.
If you've seen the previous two Dead films and not Day then you'll love this film (If your're a real fan you'll realise that the actor who plays the Army Boss is the guy who was in Dawn of the Dead as one of the "cops" that escapes in a boat before the main characters fly off in the helicoptor)
Top marks for everything then to Romero for this third installment of the Dead Trilogy.
Buy the film! It's a true classic!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Day Of The Dead, 10 Feb 2003
This review is from: Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986] (DVD)
The third installment of this trilogy of films by director George A. Romero, has a much more darker and desperate feel to it than its predecessors. Set in an underground facility created to investigate the now widespread problem of zombies, the research team assigned to this task encounter nothing but contempt from the soldiers protecting them. Mainly due to their sense of isolation at being the only survivors in the immediate area. It is the friction created by these two very separate groups of people and the situation that they find themselves in, which makes the movie so enduring and entertaining despite its age. The token mad scientist thrown in to provide the films more horrific moments doesn't help matters, though his training of the zombie "bub" is very interesting to say the least. My only criticism about this movie is the weak ending but, the post apocalyptic storyline is so atmospheric you won't really care.
The level of gore in this is amazing with the effects creators almost having a "candyland" experience with what they could achieve within the budget. Watch out for the opening sequences soundbite used in the song M1A1 by the gorillaz, as although this is classic cinema and should be taken with a pinch of salt, the soundtrack is cringingly 80's esque.
All in all, it is a worthy ending for this highly entertaining series of films, a must see movie for all fans of the genre.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best!, 19 Nov 2011
By 
K. Daniels - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Day of the Dead [DVD] (DVD)
There's no denying it, George Romero's original Dead trilogy is the greatest and most influential trilogies in all of horror, or at the very least the zombie genre. DAY OF THE DEAD is perhaps the goriest of the lot, with so many great characters, zombies, story and blood and guts. This Arrowdrome DVD is perfect for those in need for some zombie action whose wallets are slightly empty. The quality of this DVD is top notch, with a very interesting commentary, a couple of featurettes, an informative booklet and awesome reversible artwork. It's a great package especially at the price it is!

Highly recommened for those you've yet to see DAY OF THE DEAD and dont want to spend too much of their hard earned cash.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blu Ray Review, if you can find it..., 12 April 2010
By 
Paul McNamee "Rambleast Reviews" (North Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Compared to the other two films in Romero's original trilogy (joined by a new trio in the last five short years) it is Day that gets the least praise from fans and critics alike. It's not as revolutionary as Night Of The Living Dead was and lacks the immediate social resonance of Dawn... Still, it's a film that rewards repeated viewing, and while certainly the least commercially viable of the three, it is also the most thought provoking, and in many ways, entertaining.

Where Day... appears to have let people down is in its uncompromisingly nihilistic approach. There is nothing of the fun of Dawn... held over for this picture. From the locations and cinematography to the methods of ghoul dispatch, there is a touch of depression to this movie, no sign of anything resembling hope. Instead, Romero's focus is on the development of his creations. In the first truly progressive film in the series, he explores an idea only prodded at in the Dawn...finale- the living dead have memory, yes, but how can this be exploited? The plot of the movie sees a group of twelve holed up underground in a vaguely alluded-to research mission. The scientists are working away at increasingly risky endeavours while their assigned military keepers are dropping off, a point of contention with their leader-by-default, Captain Rhodes. While Dr. `Frankenstein' Logan toils away at training the zombies, Rhodes' and his men's behaviour begs the question if society is really worth saving at all.

The film is built around a tight group of involving performances by turns frenzied and subdued. Joe Pilato is a fury of constantly simmering discontent, a military man whose frustrations and inadequacies prove lethal to his co-inhabitants. Pilato hams it up in arguably the most memorable role in any of Romero's canon. Support comes from the late Richard Liberty, chewing scenery as the one scientist determined to tame the living dead, with Sherman Howard (or Howard Sherman) as his primary subject and the first (and only?) zombie icon, Bub. Lori Cardille keeps the feminists at bay with the first strong lead in a Romero zombie film, and Anthony Dileo and Gary Klar offer up turns manic and macho respectively. Terry Alexander and Jarlath Conroy entertain as a Caribbean and an Irishman duo living in a Winnebago dubbed The Ritz in the heart of the mine.

By this, his ninth film, Romero was a master of his craft: gone are the editing problems of earlier movies (though the constant energy remains), and his countering of ideas and action is expertly handled. Scenes in which zombies must be collared for research are as tense as anything he's directed, as is a trek through the mines for our outcast heroes. True to form in this period, his writing is as sharp as a tack- the characters' interactions are scripted sufficiently to bolster the many themes of the film.

One thing which I've learned to appreciate over the years is producer's John Harrison's score for the film, which acts as a strong counterweight to the film's gloomy aesthetic- it's dated, yes, but it's also full of rich themes and performs as actual film music, unlike Goblin's superb work on Dawn..., which was simply a prog masterpiece stuffed into a movie.

Savini steps up the gore from Dawn... (though sadly does not star himself), working with a bigger team of professionals. Thriller seems to have had a sizeable influence on the makeup effects here, though Michael Jackson was never seen enjoying as much grue as Romero's carnivorous hordes. The squeamish need not apply, as after 90 minutes of abstinence we are treated to the visual of comeuppance in a baptism of gore. My only complaint concerns the false teeth used on too many of the unlucky dead- a little too kids-at-Hallowe'en for my liking.

Day Of The Dead is not at first an easy watch, particularly in comparison to its joyous, comic-book-in-motion predecessor, but it is a smarter film and can easily hold its own with Dawn... or Martin as a candidate for the director's best work.

It doesn't quite benefit as much from its HD upgrade as Dawn... did on Arrow's Blu-Ray release for that film, but it certainly looks better than their 2005 DVD. The image is free from dirt (save one or two flecks) and grain is absent without sacrificing clarity. The bookending shots of sunny countryside look marvelous, but the majority of the film that's set in the bunker underground isn't much to look at, so the HD isn't, to use the often-favoured term, glorious. No other artifacts are there to observe. Overall, a near spotless transfer of a film that may not have deserved the overhaul (Arrow recently scrapped their planned BD release of Martin due to insufficient source materials).

The sound mix is perfectly fine too, but again, not much to write home about. We're talking Romero, not Bay, so expect plenty or clear dialogue and the odd blast of gunfire. The surround is effective (one scene where an otherwise unheard zombie replies to Alexander's raised voice in the distance chilled me to the core), and the score doesn't overtake the dialogue or SFX. A perfunctory track, then.

The new extras for this edition turn the spotlight on Pilato, in a 50 minute candid interview (fun if familiar anecdotes) and a 17 minute piece following his Q&A Tour in Ireland and Scotland. The Audio Collections Of Richard Liberty and the Wampum Mine promo video on the second disc are taken from the US edition, and this is their first time on UK DVD. The 'The Many Days Of Day Of The Dead' features a decent selection of interviews but only about four cast members show up. More interesting is an ancient onset feature about creature effects. Also included are trailers, galleries, and the effects team commentary from the previous Arrow release.

Anyone that owns the Dawn... BD can expect the same level of quality from this release- the matching packaging features four options for cover art, an interesting essay, a double sided poster and an well-written but averagely-drawn comic inside a kind of windowbox slipcase. Really beautiful and well worth an upgrade, Arrow's latest release confirms their dedication to cult movies and this fan-friendly package is the best release of the movie yet.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Arrow Blu Ray : some doubts about the transfer, 9 Nov 2013
By 
Stephen E. Andrews "Writer" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Recently I've been upgrading my collection of what I think of as 'Modern Classic Horror Films' to BD. As Kim Newman suggests in his book 'Nightmare Movies', the post-Gothic, Modern Horror film appeared with 'Night of the Living Dead' in 1968. For me, by the end of the 1980s, the genre was in terminal decline, so the kind of films I've been purchasing for maybe the third time has included the aforementioned Romero classic (which looks fabulous on the official BD), 'The Texas Chainsaw Massacre', 'Halloween', the works of Dario Argento between 1975-1982 and the like.

I saw 'Day of the Dead' at the cinema when it first appeared. While it doesn't have the immediate iconic appeal of 'Night' and 'Dawn', I've always felt it is a great film and easily the most consistent and even of the initial 'Dead' trilogy (I won't mention the second trilogy). The film is of a piece, flowing seamlessly from one scene to the next, with superior effects and music to its predecessors, with no jarring moments - for me some of the library music of 'Night' ruins the consistency of the film, while to my way of thinking, there is not yet a definitive cut of 'Dawn' - the ideal version for me would be a revision of the extended cut that incorporated the additional thrills and violence of the European cut and featuring only the music by Goblin, albeit pumped up in the mix...and all of this on bluray in hidef, DTS 5.1, naturally. I can dream.

'Day of the Dead', however, can't really be improved, except in terms of quality of presentation. The Arrow UK 3 disc edition incorporates all the special features from the previous US divimax edition DVD on 2 DVDs (plus the film on DVD) and of course, a BD disc.

Arrow are by now well known for delivering inconsistent results on BD. To be fair, you can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear, but when a film as technically proficient as Argento's 'Tenebrae' ends up with a worse transfer than Fulci's 'Zombi 2' (aka 'Zombie Flesh eaters' something is amiss - not to dis the Fulci, it's a cracking feature and my enjoyment of it has been improved enormously by Arrow's stunning transfer, despite the 6 seconds of missing footage at the start of the film), you know that their quality control needs questioning. who is in charge at the office, Arrow?

The BD of 'Day' looks better than the divimax DVD, but is a disappointment: so many of the well-lit sequences seem very soft-focussed, especially in the backgrounds, while the foregrounds sometimes fail too - in numerous scenes the actors' faces lack the sharpness one expects from good cinematography and proper bluray mastering. The darker scenes in the mine are absolutely fine and the gore sequences are pretty amazing. Although this is a big improvement on the DVD versions - the blues have the kind of steeliness only seen on DVD and theatrically - I still feel a better transfer must be possible. No way were the actors' faces out of focus when filmed...

Overall, this BD doesn't approach the quality of 'Suspiria' and Arrow's 'Zombie Flesh Eaters' - and remember, these were Italian films both made some years before 'Day of the Dead'. Another worthy comparison is the Blue Underground BD of 'the Living Dead at Manchester Morgue', which looks amazing -and this was a cheapish film made in 1974 (and to my mind, the best living dead movie of them all after 'Night').

Finally, I'd urge fans to seek out the recent double CD reissue of the soundtrack - not listed on amazon - from the USA, as it's a stunning bit of work and massively underrated.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best zombie Film ever!, 6 Feb 2005
This review is from: Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986] (DVD)
This in my option is the best of the bunch even though it's been criticized as the weakest one. The gore effects still stands up today and even though the acting lets it down slightly it is not to be taken seriously. I cannot wait for wait Romeo's forth installment "Land of the Dead".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quick Reviews!, 16 Sep 2007
By 
This review is from: Day Of The Dead [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
Usually seen as the weakest of the trilogy, and by a long way the most gore filled, this is by no means a bad film. The film was plagued from the start with budget problems, and script re-writes. This was originally supposed to be Romero's epic, though the finished product bears little relation to the original concept. If Romero had had better funding, certain improvements could have been made to the script, but he still provides an excellent and grim film. Like the previous films, we are given a sense of claustrophobia, of being sealed inside by what's outside as the film is set mainly in one place. While NOTLD was set in a farmhouse, and the characters may have been able to run somewhere else, and Dawn was set in a shopping mall where all your hearts desires could be found for low low prices, this is set in an underground shelter with miles of caverns leading to nowhere: it's as if the human race has already sealed itself in Hell. The zombies hold the earth.

The few survivors are not plain civilians as before, they work for a government which does not exist anymore, with the soldiers supposedly facilitating the scientists. Both groups are torn amongst themselves, with the soldiers under the command of Rhodes-one of the most psychotic characters ever, yet completely understandable (played with the utmost power and realism by Pilato and surely deserving of some awards), and the scientists all pulling in different directions. This is primarily a film of characterisation as we see how each person reacts to the realisation that the zombies have won. It may be true that none of the characters are likable, but this only adds to the realism as if we were in this situation, it is likely those around us would p*ss us off most of the time. Even at the end, contrary to what others say, the future holds no hope. The only escape is to hide and wait for your own inevitable death.

But the film is very funny, perhaps sometimes unintentionally, as seen in Dr. Frankenstein's antics ("no! no, you must listen to me!" Rhodes <with machine gun> "listen to this"! ). The effects, again done by Tom Savini are simply amazing, with faces being torn apart, heads flying off, and intestines spilling everywhere-every single death scene is a masterpiece of gore. Although many horror fans do not like this, it portrays a horrifying situation like no other movie. Perhaps not even the most hardened fan can bear the grimness of what is happening, subconscious fears making them hate it???

Finally a decent DVD version of Day Of The Dead is released- the first disc is a crisp cut of the film in all it's bloody glory. The second disc has good extras- a solid documentary, and a behind the scenes feature, as well as the usual trailers, filmographies. If you don't have the Trilogy of the Dead box set, this is a must.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apocalyptic horror from the grand master of horror directors, 2 Mar 2001
This review is from: Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986] (DVD)
Despite being dismissed by many critics as a mere excercise in splatter, Day Of The Dead is, put simply, the best zombie film ever made; in some ways surpassing even Romero's own achievements on the other classic films in the series, Night Of the Living Dead and Dawn Of the Dead. It is a much more mature and intelligent film than the others in the series, and has loftier goals.
When the film opens, humanity is effectively lost, it's few representatives outnumbered as they are by several hundred thousand to one in favour of the walking dead. Only a few scientists and their military protectors survive, huddled into a missile silo in Florida, where they work to find some sort of defense against the marauding threat. It is of course hopeless, but there may be a glimmer of hope left, if they can find a way to domesticate the zombies.
How many horror films have the guts to start the film by saying, 'It's all over. There ain't no going back'? This one sure does.
Exceptional writing and directing from George A. Romero, gruesome effects from the maestro, Tom Savini and wonderful acting from Lori Cardille, Joe Pilato, Gary Klar and the late Richard Liberty this is the horror DVD that no self-respecting fan of the genre can afford to be without.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dont eat anything before this film!, 4 May 2003
This review is from: Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986] (DVD)
The third and final film of the George A.Romero zombie trilogy and by far the most gory.The walking dead have taken over the world and only a small band of the living survive.This group of scientists and soldiers are barricaded in an underground base,where the chief scientist is conducting grotesque research experiments on the zombies.Dvd extras-widescreen edition(letterbox format digitally re-mastered)-scene selections-behind the scenes footage-horror trailers-biograpthies- filmograpthies-photogallery.Great package for fans of the genre.It looks like the BBFC have not made any substantial cutting to this film this is about as close to the definetive version as your going to get,until the Anamorphic widescreen 5.1dolby edition comes out towards the end of this year on region 1!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Serious (NOT ROB) Zombie Flick ( or Bub 'll get y'all), 13 Sep 2012
This review is from: Day of the Dead [DVD] (DVD)
Purchased as part of the four disc boxset c. 2002.
My view is that this is the best of Romero' zombie films to date.
Romero executes the last days with a dispassionate and (possibly) very gory sardonic humour.
Brief Synopsis - "Blackadder' Darling" in charge of the "war" against zombies; The head scientist (nicknamed Frankenstein) trying to domesticate them (zombies,soldiers and civillian survivors), civillians agog at the mismanagement by the army and the scientists, and the grunts not getting a lot of time to do anything but complain, and die.
It's not subtle - but like Return of the Living Dead,Shaun..., Dawn... - the remake, Zombieland and the fourth of the trilogy- Land...) there is gore aplenty, and a lot of subtext, if you want it.
The payoffs are the equal of those in the 1st 2 movies. The effects are still jaw dropping - Mr Savini and his cohorts outdo themselves. The nearest match I can imagine, to the last 20 minutes of mayhem, would be to somehow get transported in to a Breughel or Bosch painting.
SPOILER ALERT Romero' characters do not comply to stereotype all the way through. They get subverted very soon after they are setup. One bad turn deserves another... The captain in charge , the scientist playing at God, the girl, the good time "boys" - are all stock , but watch how they develop or don't...
Romero does not appear to want us to get too attached to any of the main protaginists, as we had in Dawn and Night. The best character is dead... The overriding feeling is that anyone could be for the chomp... In deed have humans become just food?
This film goes further with the "progress" and regression elements that were hinted at in the first 2 movies. This is more than a Hollywood disaster movie (Think Will Smith in Legion has it tough???), This is gristley and gut wrenching (literally) but properly thought provoking and entertaining.
This is a classic 10 out of 5
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 210 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986]
Day Of The Dead [DVD] [1986] by George A. Romero (DVD - 2001)
11.39
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews