Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars62
4.5 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£4.49+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

VINE VOICEon 17 April 2006
By 1999, RATM felt like a spent force. Having spent aeons producing their second and third albums (four years between their debut and Evil Empire; three years between that and The Battle of Los Angeles) the cracks were starting to show. But the band confounded all expectation, releasing a covers album in tribute to the artists that influenced them growing up, produced by - who else, for a record of this nature? - Rick Rubin.

All told, this is a patchy album, but the better tracks more than make up for it, and a good way for the band to bow out. Springsteen's 'The Ghost of Tom Joad' is a gloriously echoing epic that made it justifiably into their latter-day setlists. 'How I Could Just Kill A Man' is a faithful, if slightly rocked up, Cypress hill song that feels like it was written for RATM. 'Kick Out The Jams' is one of the weaker moments due to Tom Morello's outlandish solo; always an inventive player, just this once the song would have been more suited to a normal solo.

There are less enjoyable covers here as well - 'Pistol Grip Pump,' 'Street Fighting Man' - but all the songs here, good or bad, are blown away by the closer, 'Maggie's Farm.' Previously one the standouts of Dylan's wondrous Bringing It All Back Home album, it's the song the band rework to the best effect. The song is almost completely unrecognisable except for the fantastic lyrics, with Morello's multi-textured, explosive solo replacing Dylan's wheezy harmonica with ease. It's six and a half minutes in length, and - just like 'Freedom' on their first album - is a fitting closer to the album and the band's career.

This album is not perfect; it may not even have been necessary. But if you want to complete all the pieces of the Rage Against The Machine picture, you need to buy this album, to see where the ideas came from for the most incendiary band of the 1990s.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 December 2002
Critics generally passed this off, with the exception of a few music magazines that hailed what would be Rage Against The Machine's last album. But as one magazine said about RATM's previous album, "who cares? This rocks."
Rage make every song on this album their own. Even turning the Rolling Stones' 'Street Fighting Man' into a breakneck speed, beat and effect-driven whirlwind, Zack's voice going from lazy drawls to heavy whispering, to classic Zack screams.
The angry, violent 'How I Could Just Kill A Man' or the thunderous bass displayed on the cover Volume 10's 'Pistol Grip Pump' are amazing lessons in how rap and metal should be combined, as is the opening 'Microphone Fiend', or Afrika Bambattaa's classic 'Renegades Of Funk'. The last is practically a description of Rage in one chorus.
A groove-laden version of Bruce Springsteen's haunting 'The Ghost Of Tom Joad' is here, also a almost apocalyptic cover of Bob Dylan's 'Maggie's Farm'. There is one problem, but I am nitpicking, is that that the haunting whispered acoustic cover of Devo's 'Beautiful World' is not the closing song, but hey, Rage never did anything the orthodox way.
The only covers album to ever be essential. You need this album.
0Comment|24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 September 2008
This album appears to many as a covers album, using none of their own material. This is definately not the case. The reason for this album was celebrating and applauding influences and good friends of the band (Cypress Hill in particular), by re-recording their hits. I use the word 're-recording' because the 'covers' of the songs are completely reworked to fit the mould of the Rage style we all know and love. People who simply dismiss this album really haven't listened to it properly. It may not be the same without Zack's phenomenal and awe-inspiring lyrics, but it is still a masterpiece. If you listen to the original versions of songs, such as Bruce Springsteen's The Ghost of Tom Joad, you would definately not say it was a cover, but instead homage being paid to the Boss. This album has introduced me to new styles of music, the sort that made Rage what it is today, where Zack gains his rapping influences and friendships, with EPMD and Cypress Hill. After this album, i tried to listen to all the original versions, but the differences are more than significant, with the originals being awesome in their own way. I would now rate Cypress Hill as one of my favourite groups, only having discovered them through this album.
For any true Rage fan, it is obviously a must-buy. For any non-Rage fans, buy it and listen, you will be surprised what they can do, and in time may well convert you into a fan.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 April 2001
After the shock announcement which leaves one of the most explosively vibrant bands of our time without a front man, and many fans without the band which was their inspiration and drive, comes RENEGADES; Rage Against The Machine's 4th album. Perhaps at first a curious concept for a band so inventive- its an album of cover versions- Rage's choice reworkings of a selection of politically conscious hip-hop, rap and rock songs blend perfectly. Stand out tracks include 'Kick out the Jams' (which will be familiar to anyone fortunate enough to witness their amazing live set), the anger unleashed that is 'In My Eyes', furious hip-hop groove 'How I could Just Kill A Man' and a storming version of the 80s classic 'Maggie's Farm'. Tom Morello's characteristically forceful guitar solos and Zack's hard-edged though surprisingly versatile vocal talents give RENEGADES a fresh, cutting-edge feel which recaptures the power of their self-titled debut. Add to this 2 bonus live tracks and you have an unmissable album no Rage fan should be without.
11 comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 February 2001
After the shock announcement which leaves one of the most explosively vibrant bands of our time without a front man, and many fans without the band which was their inspiration and drive, comes RENEGADES; Rage Against The Machine's 4th album. Perhaps at first a curious concept for a band so inventive- its an album of cover versions- Rage's choice reworkings of a selection of politically conscious hip-hop, rap and rock songs blend perfectly. Stand out tracks include 'Kick out the Jams' (which will be familiar to anyone fortunate enough to witness their amazing live set), the anger unleashed that is 'In My Eyes', furious hip-hop groove 'How I could Just Kill A Man' and a storming version of the 80s classic 'Maggie's Farm'. Tom Morello's characteristically forceful guitar solos and Zack's hard-edged though surprisingly versatile vocal talents give RENEGADES a fresh, cutting-edge feel which recaptures the power of their self-titled debut. Add to this 2 bonus live tracks and you have an unmissable album no Rage fan should be without.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 December 2000
Rage return with a cover album which is excellent from the first trademark Morello sounds to last cheer of the crowd on the bonus live tracks. A warning not all of this record is typical rage but all of it is brilliant. It sees the band return to their hip-hop and punk roots. 'Kick out the Jams' wouldn't be out of place on a beastie boys album and Cypress Hill's 'How I could just kill a man' sounds more like its ratm's own work. The poignant 'Beautiful World' shows the diverse talent of the band and particularily singer Zack De La Rocha. 'In my eyes' is pure punk and Sringsteens 'The Ghost of Tom Joad' is hardly recognisable. The bonus live tracks are a consolation for those who will never hear these songs live after the departure of De La Rocha from the group. If you like ratm buy this record if you dont buy it anyway, this is album is a must for hip-hop,metal,punk,funk well music fans everywhere buy it now....go on.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 January 2001
This is RAGE at their very best. This is not an album of cover versions as was advertised before the release, but an album of originals remastered in the Rage style. They have kept to the original songs outline, while adding the trademark electric riffage of Morello and the hyped, firey vocals of Zack making this one of the best offerings from Rage yet. The two bonus live tracks shows that none of the crazy sounds are computerised but all just pure skill, They can definitly kick it live. This album is amazing in every sense of the word, a real must for any one who has bought the previous three masterpieces. Zack could not have left on a higher note.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 April 2001
Bizzarely, it seems that the righteous rock of Rage has been suffused with a new element. On songs such as "Kick Out The Jams", although they are making a point, Rage seem to be letting their hair down a little.
But that is a rare occassion. Throughout, this is classic Rage. They blast out revolutionary music, music with soul and purpose. But they've changed again. This time, Tom Morrello seems tohave taken a back seat for Zack to spit out his lyrics and truly show his worth as a rapper. He can carry a tune like no other, as proved by "Renegades Of Funk"; he is genuinely a multi-talented revolutionary. If nothing else, he could lead the people of the world to unite and rise up. Meanwhile, Brad Wilk and Tim C are brought to the fore more than ever before by the rap tunes; they too prove their incredible ability.
That's not to say Morrello fades into obscurity. "Housin'" proves his absolute skill, as it ascends from a rap verse to a chorus of the guitar, in a state of total rock controlled chaos; meanwhile, the mournful wail of the guitar on "The Ghost Of Tom Joad" brings me out in goosebumps.
But one of the most effective songs is "Beautiful World"; with no rapping, solos, and very little bass, this shows the true Rage spirit: "It's a beautiful world for you - not me".
Unfortunately, the bands that Rage have influenced lack this spirit, this ability to fight, to move you, sticking rather to macho, chest-beating anthems. But let's not blame them for that: rather let us remember a band that brought spirit, heart and soul to modern music.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 August 2007
In 2000 in the midst of a break up Rage decided to treat their fans to one last record,a record made also in tribute to some of the bands who inspired them. And so it was that Renegades came about. The Album opens with a couple of Hip-Hop covers, the Eric B and Rakim classic "Mic Fiend" and a more obscure but L.A favourite, Volume 10's "Pistol Grip Pump". Both of these are an exellent example of rage making songs their own, with Tom Morello serving up a tasty riff, Brad and Tim keeping a tight rythym and Zachs smooth rapping becoming the icing on the desert. And the fun doesn't stop there, The MC5 becoming an obvious choice for a political cover song, Rage serve up a stomping version of "Kick out the Jams" that perfectly suits there radical musings.

While there are many other exellent covers, particularly where rage go punk on "In My Eyes" with some astonishing drumming from Brad Wilk, a blazing live cover of The Boss's "Ghost of Tom Joad" and a touching version of Devo's "Beautiful World" where zach actually sings, the band do hit a couple of false notes here and there. E.P.M.D's "Im Housin'" for example isnt a very enjoyable listen, and they do soften up The Stooges "Down On The Street" a little too much for my liking. However Dylans "Maggies Farms" isnt half bad and an ambitious cover song for a Rap/Rock band! so overall Kudos to rage for providing a fitting cover album, that im sure most Rage fans will enjoy and perhaps the bands can have a giggle too! Good Times.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 August 2002
this is an excellent album; angry, moving and funky all at the same time. before i heard this album i was never really that into hip hop, but rage's reworkings of hip hop tracks has definitely opened up a new door of musical interest for me.
buy it! that's all i can say about this or any other album by rage, cos they were just such a powerful and sensational band.
just genius!
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£3.99
£4.06
£4.40

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)