Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars9
4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£8.49+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Grafting Communist belief to an ailing regime, Laibach scared their parents generation by taking it all very seriously. Under their sleeves they must have howled with a Central European sense of humour. They obeyed commands in the way Jaroslav Hasek had the good soldier Svejk parading across Central Europe to the tune of his superiors.

Laibach contended with a socialism draining through boredom rather than placing its citizens in gulags. Taking the regime at its word they called for and adopted the socialist realist perspective. When applied rigorously it turns into comic surrealism. As the regime shattered however, the petty nationalisms emerged in the wake and the social realism of the jackboot became the model uniform of young Croats, Serbs, Bosnians and people from the surrounding countries.

The music is a blend of hard rock, hunting sounds, deutsche kunste hystrionics, Churchillian speeches all spun into a classical industrial jackboot crunch towards enlightenment liberation. John Heartfield set to music. Laibach expose the sexual liberation of being restricted within a uniform rather than finding the freedom without. It is the antithesis of the 60's notion of long hair, dope smoking, blues loving liberation.

Laibach have a European sensibility, drawing on kitsch, sentimentality, pathos and violence, all of the dangerous elements which created the carnage of the 20th C.

When it emerged from the speakers it conjures death and night and blood. This could have been the direction for central europe in not appreciating the irony. Luckily everyone got the joke in time and turned back.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 January 2004
When I first listened to this album, it changed my life. That's how good I think it is.
Don't listen to it thinking "rock" or "metal", "techno" or "pop" this is in a category of it's own. Mixing rock, jazz and a host of other styles with orchestrations so good, Wagner himself would appraise it.
Onto the tracklisting itself:
Leben Heisst Leben: A great intro, a Deutsch version of track 5 with rearranged instruments. Great vocals and arrangments with a good guitar solo (which is meant to be OTT into the extreme).
Geburt Einer Nation: Got them banned, big time. Listen to it and you'll think you know why. Listen to it a few more times (or check whom actually wrote the song, and what it is a cover version of and you realise that the song is really a sheep in wolf's clothing. Awesome song though, trumps the original like most Laibach covers.
Leben-Tod: I prefer the Peel Sessions version but still it's a worthy song.
F.I.A.T.: Awesome. From the dramatic sweeping intro to the thundering beat and rythm. The vocals are haunting as well, and the message is so clear over the song.
Opus Dei: English language version and rearrangement of track one. This song introduced me to Laibach. Such a proud song, nay, anthem. This cover of a seemingly pointless song is so great it's almost unexplainable. It's akin to a national anthem, with lyrics about "when we all give the power..." etc and a stunning arrangement to match. You have to listen to get the full experience.
Trans-National: Thundering, pounding. Again, I prefer the Peel Sessions and Occupied Europe NATO Tour versions but still, the studio version is worthy.
How The West Was Won: A guitar riff that i think Queen would later steal from them for usage in Princes Of The Universe (or is it the other way around) introduces you to a pounding song with unrelenting imagery and an industrial landscape you could taste.
The Great Seal: Concludes the album perfectly. A fantastic instrumental that again could double as a national anthem. It sweeps through beautifully and gets to the end, where Winston Churchill's legendary "we will never surrender" speech is spoken before a final burst of music. This song has recently been used to great effect in an anti-Iraq war flash film.
The four bonus tracks (excerts from "Baptism Under Triglav") will not be reviewed, but they're good.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 April 2009
An extraordinary record, which stands the test of time. Utterly unique and essential to any broad based collection. Although the group had what was likely, a faux fascist image, there is no doubting the power and hypnotic elements that draw you in - the thunderous drumbeat and eerie horns, both disturb and exite; one can appreciate how the rallies of the30's, hypnotised the participants - that is both the power and the warning that is the essence of Laibach - but it's ok to enjoy the buzz
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 July 2014
It was my first Laibach album. A friend at school lent it to me but I had to visit another friend in order to be able to have a listen (CD players were still a bit of a luxury). I will never forget her face when Leben heisst Leben marched out of the speakers. Well, at least one of us became Laibach fan for life...

Musically it's the most essential of Laibach's albums, presenting the pinnacle of the style that elevated them to the position they occupy since (there are, of course, other artistic and political aspects of their activities, but let's just stick to the music here). Of course, it's not for everybody. The martial industrial, as it's been described, is highly uncompromising and sits quite comfortably on the same shelf as early Swans and let's not forget that Laibach is quoted as the strongest influence by members of Rammstein.
But the thing I love about it most, I think is that it's all so funny. The moment I recognised Life is Life and One Vision I genuinely laughed and they still amuse me today, some twenty years later.

If you've just about heard about Laibach and want to give it a try, this is a great album to start, but I would highly recommend a streaming service before purchasing.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 February 2005
When I first listened to this album, it changed my life. That's how good I think it is.
Don't listen to it thinking "rock" or "metal", "techno" or "pop" this is in a category of it's own. Mixing rock, jazz and a host of other styles with orchestrations so good, Wagner himself would appraise it.
Onto the tracklisting itself:
Leben Heisst Leben: A great intro, a Deutsch version of track 5 with rearranged instruments. Great vocals and arrangments with a good guitar solo (which is meant to be OTT into the extreme).
Geburt Einer Nation: Got them banned, big time. Listen to it and you'll think you know why. Listen to it a few more times (or check whom actually wrote the song, and what it is a cover version of and you realise that the song is really a sheep in wolf's clothing. Awesome song though, trumps the original like most Laibach covers.
Leben-Tod: I prefer the Peel Sessions version but still it's a worthy song.
F.I.A.T.: Awesome. From the dramatic sweeping intro to the thundering beat and rythm. The vocals are haunting as well, and the message is so clear over the song.
Opus Dei: English language version and rearrangement of track one. This song introduced me to Laibach. Such a proud song, nay, anthem. This cover of a seemingly pointless song is so great it's almost unexplainable. It's akin to a national anthem, with lyrics about "when we all give the power..." etc and a stunning arrangement to match. You have to listen to get the full experience.
Trans-National: Thundering, pounding. Again, I prefer the Peel Sessions and Occupied Europe NATO Tour versions but still, the studio version is worthy. Imagine a bullet-train from Slovenia crashing through Western Europe and you're almost there.
How The West Was Won: A guitar riff that i think Queen would later steal from them for usage in Princes Of The Universe (or is it the other way around) introduces you to a pounding song with unrelenting imagery and an industrial landscape you can taste.
The Great Seal: Concludes the album perfectly. A fantastic instrumental that again could double as a national anthem. It sweeps through beautifully and gets to the end, where Winston Churchill's legendary "we will never surrender" speech is spoken before a final burst of music. This song has recently been used to great effect in an anti-Iraq war flash film.
The four bonus tracks (excerts from "Baptism Under Triglav") will not be reviewed, but they're good.
0Comment|13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 July 2014
Not my usual fare, rock/metal would be that, but I have an eclectic taste and this is worthy of it. Some tracks are just too far out but the majority of the album is well worth listening to. Highly recommended.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 September 2011
Laibach is a bizarre parody band from Slovenia (of all places). Well, at least we all hope it's parody!

"Laibach" is actually the German name for Ljubljana, the Slovenian capital. The band's lyrics, clips and general appearance often give a Nazi-like impression, and unless I'm mistaken, they were actually banned in Russia at one point. Laibach is part of a broader modern art collective, the NSK or Neue Slowenische Kunst.

For all I know, the band are actually "liberals", but their postmodern antics are easily misunderstood and, perhaps, counterproductive. After all, what do you do if the real thing (post-1989 fascism) looks very much like a parody of the parody? LOL.

"Opus Dei" is perhaps Laibach's most well known album, and includes a genial cover version of Queen's "One Vision". The original song is "liberal" and inspired by Martin Luther King, but by simply translating the lyrics to German and shout "Jawohl" here and there, Laibach transforms it into a Nazi propaganda tune! And, incidentally, exposes our most deep-seated prejudices about Germans. I mean, why should the language of Goethe and Schiller be considered Nazi? ;-)

Another classic is Laibach's absolute slaughter of Opus' "Live is life", which they also manage to transform into some kind of fascist agit-prop, despite the original song being more innocuous than puppy love. (The album title "Opus Dei" is presumably also a reference to poor Opus.)

OK, I admit that my younger and more frivolous side somehow likes this. But is it good music? Naaaaah. I doubt it. Unless you're a modern art student, you'll probably won't get this...
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 1 August 2010
This is a great album,Very Fascist yet also very Communist in its audio-Visual style with an eclectic mix of musical influences all the way from the thundery Queen spoof,One Vision,that actually works sincerely,as personally I had long since lost interest in Queen's histrionic gay Pop crap,to the Life is Life version that shows how a particular treatment can alter the mood of a given melody so much...There are some wonderful melodies here,too,As only Laibach can or could deliver in modern music,as well as some outings that are either progressive rocky or late prog punky...The four last songs seem to feature a background Goebbels speech from the era of that disastrous war Europa still pays for...Perhaps this set is better than their later technoey stuff although MacBeth is or was excellent,too,as are some songs on Kapital.

If you want to start with Laibach then this album is much more accessible than their earlier industrial slavophone albums which are all rather bleakly if earnestly doomladen,grim,dreary,sparse,incomprehensible and unmelodic even though still worth a listen although it might be too gothic or ironic for Vlad Dracula and yet,oddly enough this area is where National-Socialism began...Laibach Beginners,try this as the four extra tracks that were on the cassettes but which were not on the eight song vinyl record are here inclusive.MacbethLet It BeNato
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 January 2007
Laibach are a very important band (I imagine GWB has never heard of them but Brandon Flowers most certainly has) - this and Kapital are their greatest statements to pop culture - where is Steel Trust on CD? Like Jan Garbarek, you changed a life..
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£10.25

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)