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4.7 out of 5 stars
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4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 14 June 2000
This album was always set to be a winner, as it followed the incredible Gospel Oak EP and the gorgeous Universal Mother before that, but I certainly wasn't expecting anything as consistently enjoyable as this. I've always found Sinéad's albums to be patchy affairs but not Faith And Courage. There isn't even a hint of filler on this album. Things start off subtly with The Healing Room. Probably the most ambient of the tracks in terms of production, and also the weakest melodically speaking. Still, it's a nice intro to the album. Things really get going with the second track, No Man's Woman. This is one of my favourite songs in Sinéads entire catalogue and a great lead-off single choice, even if it has ruffled some feathers of some reviewers who have jumped to conclusions about the song's meaning. Jealous is simply a gorgeous ballad. Beautiful melody and understated production. An instant classic and surely a future single? Dancing Lessons is undoubtedly another potential single. This track is one of the more upbeat songs with a sublime piano line and catchy chorus. The combination of Sinéad and Wyclef Jean proves to be a winner. It's a shame he they didn't collaborate on more tracks. Perhaps in the future. Daddy I'm Fine is yet another great track. The almost punk chorus coming out of nowhere, and the autobiographical lyrics make it one of the most interesting tracks. Til I Whisper U Something isn't a standout of the album, but like I said before, the quality is of such a high standard that even the non-standouts are excellent. The next track is a cover version, although Sinéad is so comfortable with it, it almost sounds like one of her very own compositions. The State I'm In is definitely a highpoint. Another track written by the team who brought us Natalie Imbruglia's Torn and the aforementioned No Man's Woman, this is another strong song, both in terms of melody and lyrics. Highly commercial, without sacrifing artistry. The next track was one of the collaborations I had been most looking forward to hearing. The Lamb's Book Of Life was written with Kevin Briggs(Contemporary R&B producer) and is one of my favourites. Lyrically it's most representative of the album, appealing for forgiveness and prayer. Musically it's a dynamic combination of Celtic flutes and R&B grooves. A standout. If U Ever and Emma's Song are two more beautiful ballads which precede the closing track, Kyrie Eleison. This traditional song has been arranged by Sinéad and is an uplifting end to Faith and Courage.
All in all, this highly accesible album is possibly the finest in Sinéad's career. Gorgeous melodies, heartfelt vocals and fascinating production. Well worth checking out!
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on 23 January 2004
I've always been a casual admirer of Sinead O'connor. I loved the contrast between her mournful and melancholic voice, and the feistiness of her character.The music however always seemed to be a bit hit and miss,(How I loved 'This is a rebel song', how I loathed 'Thankyou for hearing me'). I didn't know If I could take a whole album of her sweet but tortured voice and lyrics. How could I ever have doubted her. 'Faith and Courage'is an album saturated in beauty, mysticism and spirit.Not one of the thirteen tracks fails to move me in some way.Language is inadequate to describe songs like 'The state I'm in' and 'Jealous', these are genius productions, sung by a woman who clearly has a gift for expressing pain and despair, as well as joy and contentment.I knew Sinead was good, but I had no idea she was capable of such unbelievable depths, why did she hold out on us so long?
I would urge anybody who likes their music to have a haunting and ethereal quality to invest in this album, you won't be dissappointed. Sinead O'connor has recently made a statement that she plans to retire from music in the near future. This will be a real loss to the music industry, but I am at least grateful that she released this masterpiece first. It's a real shame that such a talented individual is most likely to be remembered for her Prince cover version( The admittedly very excellent'Nothing compares 2 U'), when she had such a wealth of natural talent to draw from.Sinead, You bet I'm Jealous!
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on 24 February 2007
I love this album, it's autobiographical quality gives a great insight into wild Sinead and shows her sensitivity, depth, perspective on the universe and introspection. There are reflections of everyone's life in here, I suspect, and tracks you can immediately relate to and empathise with. It's truly a woman's album.

The music is soft edged and lyrical, the images intense, it's bold, frightened defiant and inquisitive. Her family are all there, her childhood, her wonder, her Ireland. I pair this with Kate Bush's "Hounds of Love" album - it has that same sense of feminine sprituality and being.
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on 5 June 2000
Sinead's all new material in six years come out as a breathtaking blend of a strong Irish feel, reggae beats, R&B touches and rock essence. Her spine tingling vocal are pure and edgy as ever, and so are her lyrics.
From The Healing Room to Kyrie Eleison, the album sends you to a journey that isn't easy to forget.
When compared to Sinead's earlier works, this piece is much more powerful and full of unforgettable moments. This is by far the best O'Connor album and probably will be that of the year 2000 as well.
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on 18 November 2000
Definitely one of my favourite CDs for a few years. Powerful, sensitive, moving and healing .... each track is equisite in its own right. I just love Sinead's vulnerability and innocence/wisdom which shines through the songs. Forget your judgements about Sinead's fierce protests so widely reported in the media over the years - open to the gold in the form of these 13 songs laying underneath her primal passion. Thank you Sinead for your faith and courage ... you are such an inspiration...
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on 23 July 2013
I have been a Sinead fan since the 2000s and this was the first album which I heard from her apart from the album 'So Far...' It impressed me then and when I started to enter her other works, it has remained the favourite album from her since I first heard.

I think her other highlight is 'I Do Not Want...' but I think her other records are not on the same level as her 2nd album. Finally, in 2000, this gem was released and it showed a mature and sensitive Sinead with intelligent lyrics, very strong musical arrangements and melodies. Her Celtic background is mixed here with 'Rastafari' spiritualism and elements of modern rock and the best parts of the mainstream. With this special recipe she created a very unique world, which can be called an 'International Irish'.

The best tracks...very hard to choose because all songs are outstanding and extremly strong, making a record very cohesiative. The ethereal 'Hold Back The Night', the fragile 'Emma's Song' and the beautifully emotional 'If U Ever' are among the best songs which was recorded by Sinead.

Overall, this is a fantastic record from a fantastic singer. If you want to study her music more, buy it with a bestof and 'I Do Nor Want..' and you will be satisfied!
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on 1 February 2013
When Ms O'Connor's well publicised battle with the church, her drink and drug problems and her temporary (what appeared to be) insanity she needed to pull off something a bit special to drag herself out of her rut. With her bell-like sonerous tones and deeply meaningful lyrics I think that this album acted as a form of exorcism which has not only been effective but also quite beautiful in its making. Check it out
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on 20 March 2011
This is my favourite CD by Sinead O'Connor It's deep and dark in places and full of hope in others. I listen to it frequently and often play it over and over again
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on 21 June 2000
Sinead's "Universal Mother" and "Gospel Oak" EP were beautiful, vital pieces of work. However, in this album, Sinead's emotional voice is so far into the mix, and it seems to be overdriven by boring, MOR music. Her angst seems a bit forced. The emotional pitch not touching. "Universal Mother" was confessional, this album too safe. There are some good tunes, with "Daddy I'm Fine" and "No Man's Woman" examples. I believe that Sinead should be produced by someone that would be understanding and compliment her voice and lyrics. Perhaps someone like Kate Bush or Peter Gabriel should produce Sinead. Dave Stewart was a bad choice.
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on 1 March 2016
Another great album by sinead
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