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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a classic
More than forty years after its original release, The Manchurian Candidate has lost none of its edge. Unlike many classics it is good not just retrospectively and for its time, but will captivate the modern, jaded cinema goer even today - the mark of a real classic. With a plot that leaves the audience guessing and confused through much of the film, The Manchurian...
Published on 29 Dec 2004 by Kristin

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unusual and artistic cold war fantasy
Yes, the filming is imaginative (the ladies garden club!) and the acting is great (especially from Frank Sinatra). But that conversation on the train jarred on my too when I first saw it. I've read some bizarre theories to explain it, from such sane commentators as Roger Ebert. Is Rosie a communist or government "minder"? Is she the sinister Chinese general in disguise...
Published 8 months ago by Ms. L. R. Fisher


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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly a classic, 29 Dec 2004
More than forty years after its original release, The Manchurian Candidate has lost none of its edge. Unlike many classics it is good not just retrospectively and for its time, but will captivate the modern, jaded cinema goer even today - the mark of a real classic. With a plot that leaves the audience guessing and confused through much of the film, The Manchurian Candidate manages to keep the viewer in suspense until the very end. Nothing is what it seems in this groundbreaking story about Raymond Shaw, a US soldier brainwashed in the Korean War. Frank Sinatra puts in a stellar performance as the man trying to get to the bottom of a series of mysterious events, and Angela Lansbury, despite being only two years older than the actor who plays Raymond, is utterly convincing as his mother.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In the end,it pays not to miss!, 22 Sep 2007
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This film is now 45 years old, but still stands up as a massive achievement.

I won't ruin the plot, but an army platoon's disappearance behind enemy lines in the Korean War leads to an award for their Staff Sargeant, whose stepfather just happens to be a rabid right-wing senator. It isn't the correctness of the honour's bestowal that needs to concern you, either!

The film is lit up by Frank Sinatra, as the platoon's Major, who slowly realises something evil happened, but he can't guess what, let alone why for ages. Sinatra's face in this film is expessive beyond belief-starting like a guy with a pebble in his shoe,and mildly irritated, it gradually collapses as the enormity of what might have happened sinks in, especially when he's left alone to try and reverse the seemingly inevitable conclusion.

Laurence Harvey, as the Staff Sargeant, is perfect casting-he often acted with hardly-supressed boredom and a stony expression & that suits the man he has become. But glimpses of what he actually was break through now and again, and the question boils down to which part will do what in the climax of the film.

As if that wasn't enough, Angela Lansbury, as Harvey's manipulative mother, puts in a third cracking performance. How she got to be Miss Marple after this is beyond belief-very naughty girl indeed!!

So, that's more than enough reasons to buy it-go get that credit card now!
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finest American Film of the 60's, 28 Dec 2004
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John Frankenheimer could do little wrong in the early 1960's and this political thriller, an adpatation of Richard Condon's novel, stands as probably his finest achievement. The film is dazzlingly photographed (in B&W), memorably performed (by Angela Lansbury in particular) and is blessed with a bitingly, satirical script containing surprise, humour, pathos and moments of shocking violence. There are some flaws: the plot is preposterous and Laurence Harvey makes no attempt at an American accent; but the film is so gripping from the outset that these are easily overlooked.
On the DVD, the film is presented in its original widescreen format with mono sound. Picture and audio quality are both adequate. The main extras are a commentary track from John Frankenheimer and short retrospective interviews with Frankenheimer, Frank Sinatra and screenwriter George Axelrod. Unfortunately, neither are particularly illuminating.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing, well acted, well directed, 14 Feb 2003
By 
Deborah MacGillivray "Author," (US & UK) - See all my reviews
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Lawrence Harvey was a brilliant actor, but one that tended to put people off with his aloofness bordering on arrogance. But this movie is not about likable people. It's about control, dirty politics, communism, and the anti-communist witch-hunts that took their toll on Hollywood and Washington. Harvey's distance works perfectly as Raymond Shaw, but even in the dis-likable Raymond, Frankenheimer pulls out moments of pathos. In a tour de force, Harvey is perfect as the man controlled by his mother, by forces the brainwashed him. He gives a bleak insight into the character of Raymond, a man driven to do things he has no idea why, and man so manipulated by his harpy mother, a 'gun' that has been loaded waiting for the trigger to be pulled, one that kills the woman he loves without hesitation.
But his brilliance does not dominate the film, because there are so many other superb performance by this All Star Cast. And oddly, John Frankenheimer in untypical Hollywood style, cast against roles and demanded such range from all the actors. Angela Landsbury (Murder, She Wrote) built a career of being the person everyone adored, yet in this film she is the woman behind the man...the true power. She is hard-edged, totally manipulative, rather ugly in spirit, and determined at all costs to change the face of US politics. Frank Sinatra, usually Mr. Macho, comes across as a man a tormented by dreams that made no sense, but keep him convinced something is terrible wrong, with him, with Harvey, with all the men of their unit. Many consider this Sinatra's best performance. Janet Leigh is warm as the woman who falls in love with Sinatra, though under used. James Gregory play Landsbury's husband, the wishy-washy Joe McCarthy-type senator, who is merely his wife's mouthpiece and puppet. John McGiver gives a fine supporting performance as the voice of reason, a senator who would block at all costs Landsbury pushing her husband's bid for the presidency.
The edgy, black and white lensing, gives a dated feel to the movie, but actually enforces the cold war era sensation, a perfect medium for Frankenheimer's anti-McCarthyism rant. Landsbury won an Oscar nomination and a Golden Globe for this performance. It's well deserved.
It's not a likable film, its not a comfortable film and maybe a little hard for younger generations to appreciate the horror, the tension of the cold war and McCarthyism, but is a film so brilliant it needs repeat viewing to appreciate all the small nuances.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A harrowing political thriller, 2 May 2013
By 
Erik Preben Pedersen "Jazzbum" (Espergaerde, Denmark) - See all my reviews
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John Frankenheimer directed this movie for release in 1962 (and 2 years later he directed another great thriller, "7 days in May"), and to me the former was an eye-opener that I never forgot. Maybe because political thrillers of that standard were not that common in the sixties, and another reason, beside the acting, was maybe the subject of the effects of brain-wash, that I don't recall having seen in any other movie from that period.
Frank Sinatra is, as always, very good and so is Laurence Harvey, but the most scary person is portrayed by Angela Lansbury. There is quite a gap between her part in the sugar-coated TV-series, "Murder, she wrote", to her role as the cold-blooded and unscrupulous mother to her son (LH), and Meryl Streep in same role and in the remake of the movie in 2004 didn't come close.
Great director and a great movie!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great film; shabby DVD, 9 Sep 2008
By 
N. C. Bateman (Brighton, UK) - See all my reviews
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It's not anamorphic widescreen and it's only single-layer, too. There's a better one to be had from amazon.com, though of course it's region one, so be sure you can play it. This film's a keeper, so get the best copy available!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Frankenheimer's Fine Cold War Political Thriller, 27 Aug 2013
By 
Keith M - See all my reviews
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Director John Frankenheimer's 1963 political thriller is an impressive, mostly subtle, take on cold war (conspiracy) politics, reflecting the mood of the times in the US (Cuban missile crisis, JFK assassination, etc), and (style-wise) sitting alongside other films of the period such as Dr Strangelove (with which it shares its sometimes satirical outlook) and Failsafe. Visually, the film is also very impressive with Lionel Lindon's black-and-white cinematography being moody and atmospheric (with a quasi-documentary feel at times).

Whilst the film's plot is perhaps too convoluted for its own good at times, for me, Frankenheimer's slow pacing and subtle revealing of the various plot twists and turns works well and continues to engage. In the two star billing roles, both Laurence Harvey (albeit, minus an American accent) as the returning Korean war hero, but apparently Communist-brainwashed, Sergeant Raymond Shaw, and Frank Sinatra, as his increasingly troubled, nightmare-suffering and suspicious colleague, Captain (thence Major) Bennett Marco, are very good. However, acting-wise, for me, it is in the supporting character performances where the film excels. Angela Lansbury is a revelation as Shaw's doting and officious mother, Eleanor, whilst James Gregory also impresses as her right-wing, slow-witted senator husband, John Iselin ('You're very good at a great many things but thinking, hon, just simply isn't one of them'). There are also similarly good turns from John McGiver as (suspected communist) radical left-wing senator, Thomas Jordan, and from Douglas Henderson as Colonel Milt. On the other hand, Janet Leigh and Leslie Parrish as Marco and Shaw's respective love interests, Eugenie Chaney and Jocelyn Jordan, deliver merely OK performances in what are rather perfunctory roles.

Although some of the film's early scenes of Shaw's brainwashing are a mix of impressively shocking and clumsy (with somewhat clichéd 'baddie' characterisations), by the time he and Marco have returned to the US, Frankenheimer's film reveals more subtle touches, with Harvey doing a good 'automaton' turn and Sinatra particularly impressive as the troubled soul, suffering increasingly with his nervous tics and shakes (his performance here ranks with those in The Man With The Golden Arm and From Here To Eternity as one of his very best). Similarly, there are some nice, darkly comic moments, such as at the fancy-dressed political convention and that where Shaw is inadvertently 'instructed' to 'go jump in the lake'. Of course, the fast-cut denouement sequence at the presidential candidate convention is also a highlight of the film (and is reminiscent of that in Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much).

For me, not an out-and-out classic therefore, but nevertheless a subtle and relatively innovative piece of film-making.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THIS CLASSIC HAS DATED WELL, 19 Feb 2006
By 
Mr. E. A. Dobson "dwardstings" (West Yorkshire,United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Possibly the best film of the 1960`s,definately John Frankenheimer`s best and in my opinion Harvey,Lansbury & Sinatra`s best performances.It`s hard to believe the film`s forty odd year`s old,it really does hold up well.I`ve not yet seen the remake but although it`s had mixed review`s i must confess i`m rather looking forward to it,especially the performances (Washington,Streep & Schreiber),however good or bad it is,as with all remakes it will never be as good as the original!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The turn of a friendly card, 2 Aug 2005
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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During the Korean War a platoon was mislead and abducted for nefarious purposes. This was well planned as there was only one person in the platoon that would serve further purpose SSgt. Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey) and was already in a position needed for the future. The rest of the platoon is used to support a story to help Raymond get the Congressional Metal of Honor
One other in the platoon Cap. /Maj. Bennett Marco (Frank Sinatra) finally realizes what happed and is in a position to thwart the plot this is because he is with Army Intelligence. As with real life luck would have it that he is assisted be a quirky woman who sees his potential and dumps her old beau for the new challenge.
What is the plot and will it succeed?
Or will Marco be able to foil it?
Who is the mysterious American Control?
Who are we supposed to root for?
Watch as the story unfolds and remember they can not hear you when you say "Watch out!"
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I was shocked to see Angela Lansbury, "Murder She Wrote" not being quite as nice as I remember her. A real advantage was not recognizing Laurence Harvey from anywhere and so this did not distract from his acting.
I really enjoyed watching this just as a movie and not trying to make any connections to underlying messages. But I was really surprised to find out who the American control was. And so much for the theory that you can't be forced to do anything that is not within your nature. I was surprised to the last.
With out the immediate threat of the cold war the movie still holds suspense for us. John Candy did a parody of this in the movie "Volunteers"
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tremendous, 5 May 2001
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Mr. M. P. Doney "mrdoney" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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I confess I had never heard of this film, until I saw it featuring in the IMDB movie greats list. Having read the reviews below, I decided to take a punt. It was well worth it. Without a shadow doubt, this is one of the best psychological thrillers you will ever see.
I won't waste time with any 'spoilers' in regards the cast and storyline. This is a movie I would safely give to someone and say "watch it" without telling them anything about it. Definitely one of THE MOST UNDERRATED films of all time. An absolute gem (do you get the feeling I liked this?)
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The Manchurian Candidate [VHS]
The Manchurian Candidate [VHS] by John Frankenheimer (VHS Tape - 2000)
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