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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RETURN TO CHILDHOOD
My favourite Marillion album from the Fish era has always been Fugazi but 'Misplaced Childhood' certainly has to be one of the most accomplished rock albums of the 1980s. For long time fans like me, it also takes one back to that great year (I was ten), when Marillion seemed to be in every paper and magazine, and on the radio constantly. We also got to see Fish in tartan...
Published on 18 Oct. 2006 by Stotty

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars
Sounds like this is a copy and not the original.
Published 1 month ago by sue ashton


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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Distanced by all that was between us, 11 Mar. 2010
By 
Super Dale (cheltenham, england) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Sometime during 1986, when I was eighteen and a vinyl copy of Misplaced Childhood had been my constant companion for several months, I was accused of "living my life by that bloody album" (hello Fiona). Certainly in my fevered teenage mind it was the distillation of lovelorn romanticism (in my limited experience) and, if asked, I might possibly have sworn that it was one of the top three albums of all time.

So, 25 years on, I've picked up a cheap copy on CD. I've listened to the whole of it for probably the first time in getting on for 20 years. How does it stand up?

The answer is, not very well. I've recently re-listened to Script For a Jester's Tear and other early Marillion; in the main, despite poor production, the none more prog everything but the kitchen sink energy is still thrilling. Grendel is even more epic than I remembered. Misplaced Childhood, however, is anaemic by comparison. Fish is mainly sitting in the corner moaning quietly to himself. Mark Kelly's keyboard solos are almost entirely absent. Steve Rothery's famously reductive guitar solos do burst into life now and then but for large parts of the record he's buried in the mix.

Worse, the album has attention deficit disorder. As if to acknowledge that they aren't strong enough, song ideas come and go at a dizzying speed, around nineteen of them in a surprisingly brief 40 minutes or so. Even those ideas which do work are never developed long enough to satisfy.

Of course, there are high points. I may cringe at Fish's lyrics from my middle-aged standpoint but sometimes he does produce an arresting image. Like many before him, he writes about the dislocation felt by the touring rock star, and to my ears this is what really comes through 25 years later. "Blind Curve" is a highlight, kickstarting an energy in the last few minutes that could have come earlier. And, of course, it is an irony that a band previously known for lengthy prog epics on an album that formed one continuous `suite' of music managed to produce a near-perfect pop song in `Kayleigh'.

It is easy to forget from this distance how popular Marillion were in 1985. The album went to number one, Kayleigh to number 2 and the follow up single `Lavender' to number three. Tha band went from playing sweaty clubs to full size arenas in just two years. It was a short-lived success, sure, but great while it lasted and I'm glad to see Marillion are still a going concern, supported by their fans and the Internet, although I haven't listened to anything after 1987.

I confess to being disappointed by Misplaced Childhood 25 years on. I accept this says as much about me as it does about the record; it can't possibly live up to my teenage memories, and judged dispassionately it's a great achievement. I just don't want to live in it any more.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars, 9 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Sounds like this is a copy and not the original.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A much underrated album from the 'eighties., 20 Sept. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
This was one of the most unusual yet delightful hit albums of the 'eighties. Its success is for me undoubtedly one of the highlights of 'eighties music. In the days of Madonna, The Pet Shop Boys and Culture Club, here was of all things a concept album by a British band with its roots firmly in the traditions of 'seventies progressive rock acts like Genesis and Pink Floyd. It appealed to the mainstream unlike the band's previous albums, which you either like or you don't, and produced such attractive hit singles as Kayleigh, Lavender and Heart of Lothian, three of the most distinctive rock guitar singles of the 'eighties. But this album is not just about these three songs. As with all quality albums, it is should be listened to from start to finish, and with it being a concept album, this is the case even more so. The album has one weakness, with Fish descending into political hysterics at one point. It has its part in the natural flow of the album but now sounds dated and quite embarassing. The finale has Fish singing " we will swear to have no nation ", a sentiment I'm not sure he has stayed true to with his more recent affirmations of his " Scottishness ". Nevertheless, this is one of my favourite albums, such a refreshing change from the increasingly shallow and deteriorating pop music of the 'eighties.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 21 Sept. 2014
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This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
loved it in the 80s, love it the same now.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 29 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
fab blast from the past, fast delivery.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 23 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Very good CD for marillion fans
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brill CD, 15 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
Used to have this album on vinyl many years ago. I recently heard Lavender again and just had to buy the CD.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last, Marillion get their act together!, 20 July 2000
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
After the dreadful Script for a Jester's Tear and the equally awful Fugazi, Marillion finally realised that they were better than they had been making out and produced a great rock album. I still love Kayleigh and Lavender, and so does everybody else ( though they probably wouldn't admit it because they are prejudiced ) and the guitar intro to Heart of Lothian sends a shiver up my spine. Lavender, of course, is backed up by the brilliant Bitter Suite, which tells a sad story about a young girl whose life has taken the wrong course. Fish finally gets his act together as a songwriter, Steve Rothery's guitar is magic throughout and keyboard player Mark Kelly produces some amazing melodies. One of the great concept albums.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The kind of quality rock we miss in the charts., 28 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
This album deserves to be recognised as a classic rock album of the era. It confirmed Marillion as one of the leading rock bands of the eighties when it topped the chart on its release back in 1985. Fish's songwriting is a considerable improvement on Fugazi. The album includes the love ballad Kayleigh, the endearing lyrical schmaltz of Lavender and, of course, Heart of Lothian is an ode to the singer's home roots. Fish being Fish, the album naturally has its political quota, which on listening, is now quite dated and, for me, regrettable. However, Misplaced Childhood remains a great album to listen to and is highly recommended to any Oasis fans who might want to hear what a real rock band sounds like.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic eighties album., 18 Aug. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Misplaced Childhood (Audio CD)
This smash hit album by one of the most guitar orientated bands of the eighties pop music scene still sounds great. It was best known for producing the number 2 hit Kayleigh ( a song I read recently that George Michael would apparently like to cover ) and the number 5 hit Lavender. I think Marillion recorded a better pure concept album with Brave about ten years later but Misplaced Childhood remains surely one of the better albums that eighties pop music produced so far as instrumental quality is concerned.
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Misplaced Childhood
Misplaced Childhood by Marillion (Audio CD - 2000)
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