Customer Reviews


43 Reviews
5 star:
 (36)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest Album Ever ?
There is a case to be made that this album is the greatest ever recorded. Period. I listen to it now and it still sounds awesome. Every song makes a valid statement on American society and the problems which exist. Contemporary, powerful, brilliant. Buy it now.
Published on 1 Mar. 2000 by Amazon Customer

versus
1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great album, questionable "remaster"
So I went through the trouble to order the "Def Jam Remaster" version of Nation of Millions, since it's a great album and all that. But here's what I got:

- The CD was supposedly brand new, but wasn't shrinkwrapped
- The cover insert is very obviously a scan and print of the original cover, and in some places almost looks like a color copy, the photo is...
Published on 31 Jan. 2012 by Garbageman


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest Album Ever ?, 1 Mar. 2000
By 
Amazon Customer (Harpenden, Herts United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
There is a case to be made that this album is the greatest ever recorded. Period. I listen to it now and it still sounds awesome. Every song makes a valid statement on American society and the problems which exist. Contemporary, powerful, brilliant. Buy it now.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Concious Rap Album Ever, 2 Jan. 2013
By 
Brytey (london, uk) - See all my reviews
25 year or so on, has anybody managed to encompass so succinctly, music into struggle expression? KRS1 perhaps, Nas more recently and a few less thrusted groups/artists. The originality of this album still holds true to this very 2013 day. It came from nowhere and still remains out there - untouchable fugitive. Listening back it still has the same bass heart as it did those many head whopping years ago. Test of time 10/10, lyrical content 10/10, tracks 10/10. This is one of those albums that will never again be repeated. Of course Dre's 2001, NWA' Straight Outta Compton and Tha Dogg Pound were ground breaking albums but none so with such cutting razor edge and uppercut to nosebridge POWeffect as this album. Anyone who frequented Westwoods set at Scrubbs Park (the then younger Rodigan of hip hop wannabee)back in the mid 80's will never ever forget the intro of Rebel Without a Pause, anticipating that..."I dont know what this world is coming to..." duhn, duhn (terminator transformer scratch) fist clenched like a fisherman casting rod.. craniuum back touching spine.."Yes, the rhythm, the rebel..." WHOP IT OUT!...Listening back just makes your neck ache.....with pleasure!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolute CLASSIC!!!, 1 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
What can be said about this - Not just one of ther greatest hip hop albums of all time but one of the greatest albums of all time.
After feeling that it took to long to release the 1st album (Yo bum rush the show) and hip hop had moved on in that time PE hit the ground running with this one.
The production is the amazing wall of sound they became known for-absolutely everything chucked in and this is the pinnacle of that.
The Tunes- Rebel without a pause, Dont believe the hype, Black steel in the hour of chaos, Bring the noise. Enough said!!!
So good that the band still sample this album to this day on their new releases-(check out The evil empire of everything and Most of my heroes still dont appear on no stamps).Chuck's rhymes are as relevant today as they were back then.
I still listen to this album 25 years on albeit on cd and mp3 as i wore my cassette out years ago.
Contrats to them on being inducted into the Rock & roll Hall of Fame- Truly the Rolling Stones of Rap as chuck says.
Also if they come to a town near you check them out live as they can still tear the roof of a place when they do! Going to see them in April and cant waqit to see these LEGENDS of hip hop.
If you love hip hop AND even if you dont you need to check out this CLASSIC album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A TIMELESS CLASSIC, 9 Jan. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
In todays world of multiplatinum, woman clad,bling blinging hiphop there is no album that can match the raw power, agression, storytelling, in yer face attitude that nation of millions can offer. Chuck D and Flavour flav honour Terminator X's flawless production with the verbal onslaught that it deserves. "rebel without a pause" can take a claim to the greatest hiphop track ever written, while being supported by classics like "dont beleive the hype" and "night of the living baseheads". They even sample a gut churning riff from slayers "Angel of Death" for "she watch channel zero. All in all a true masterpiece.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Pure and deadly, it still needs a bomb squad to diffuse it., 4 Aug. 2000
By 
Ugly (birmingham, wm United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
As a sequel to 'Bum rush', noone perhaps expected the impact that P.E. would have upon not just hip hop, but practically all music genres of the late eighties. And not stopping there, as the initial intro to the album suggested, sirens wailing, the revolution was maybe not televised, but P.E and the SW1s' ripped it up where ever they played, globally, with even the NME posing the question as to whether P.E. were the greatest rock n roll band ever. From the evidence of this album, harnessing the ever increasing pace of the hip hop revolution and exploding it into the anadyne, stagnating music scene of the late eighties, reaching into practically all corners of the industry and across the spectrum cultures, Chuck D, Flavor Flav and Terminator X had concocted the ultimate timebomb, with an immediate and lasting effect. Retrospective hyperbole aside, this truly was an album which would capture its intended audience and further afield, potent messages and wicked metaphor poured over the funk of the bomb squad, with the surreal talent of Flavor and militant, unstable rhetoric of Proffesor Griff combining with the best DJ talent in hip hop to create a molotov cocktail. With samples from slayer, the precursor of a symbois with some other rock group on Bring the Noise, the truly seminal Bassheads, Black steel and bazookas, and the drum track Maddonna teefed for justify my love, this album was enough to imprint the culture of enquiry, questioning and funk into those that heard it, and those who chose not to... it caught you pissin in your pants. For once, believe the hype, it defined the century for a generation and truly gave us a basis for figting the power.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Influential Hip-Hop, 20 April 2000
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
The original political rap album. Released way back in 1988, it turned rap on it's head. Between them, Public Enemy and N.W.A tore up the east and west coasts of America respectively, with their devastating back beats and "funky-ass basslines" they brought rap into the mainstream for ever. Where Run DMC had started, Public Enemy and N.W.A carried on the tradition in fine form, evolving into world beating (and baiting) rap acts, it's Public Enemy though that I am talking about. Their debut album, 'Yo! Bumrush the Show' was a promising start and 'It Takes a Nation...' took things a step further, an absolutely astounding album that will blow anyone away. Starting with their live intro of an air raid siren, it is very apt, as this album hits you like a B-52 with nuclear capabilities. 'Bring the Noise' and 'Don't Believe the Hype' are true old skool hip-hop, funky back beats and hard-ass rapping from Chuck D make them instant classics and Flavor Flav as the court jester in PE's kingdom hits the spot every time. The album just keeps going at a devastating pace, classics like 'Louder Than a Bomb', 'She Watch Channel Zero', 'Night of the Living Baseheads', Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos' and the frantic 'Prophets of Rage' are enough to make a grown man cry. On top of being fantastic songs they hold a message which all should pay heed to, their anti-racist stance is strong enough to have white people joining the Black Panthers. Last track 'Party For Your Right to Fight' deserves a special mention, both Flavor and Chuck rap together to great effect. Quite simply, loosen your purse strings and buy this album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gansta-rap??? Shut up and listen, 22 Feb. 2001
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
What can I say? If only hip-hop wasn't ransacked by gansta (similar thing that happened to grunge after Nevermind) then it would still be an essential music form. This album brims with more politics than 10 Houses of Lords and more funk than Aerosmith on a pub crawl. Countdown To Armageddon announces "This time the revolution will not be televised!" and you believe Chuck too! This track also gives birth to the Manic Street Preachers classic Repeat. The definitive hip-hop track comes next - Bring The Noise. Never has a song overflowed with so much content and brilliance, it is a screamed assault to everything that modern culture stands for and leaves you astounded. Ditto Don't Believe The Hype. So much manifesto and exchanges from Chuck to Flav, it fills me up with revolution. Falva Flav Cold Lampin' is hilarious (don't you just love this dude?), a light hearted interlude from the rhetoric and much appreciated. Not so for Terminator X To The Edge Of Panic: "Right the power is bold, the rhymes are politically cold/And who gives a **** about a Goddamn Grammy?". Fantastic. Mind Terrorist is just an interlude but we get back on the track again with Louder Than A Bomb, a seething attack on the FBI. Caught, Can I Get A Witness?! is another absolutely suberb beast of a funkster that has you singing along "Your singers are spineless/As you sing your senseless songs to the mindless/Your general subject love is minimal/It's sex for a profit". What other bands sing that, please? Another interlude in the form of Show Em Whatcha Got and then She Watch Channel Zero, which actually combines heavy metal riffs in with the verse to great effect - the ultimate moshing track! Night Of The Living Bassheads starts with a Martin Luther King or Malcom X (sorry Chuck, I can't quite remember(blush)) but other than that it's not as ground breaking as the others. After that comes the meanest, darkest track on any album I know, Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos. It is so biting and true, I just can't praise it enough. Unfortunately there's another interlude after that but it's back to form again with Rebel Without A Pause and Prophets Of Rage. Finally, the sprawling, awe-enspiring Party For Your Right To Fight. The last track to send a shiver down my spine with a mixture of white-hot lyrics and bastardized slap funk. The only hip-hop album worth buying.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Political Rap's Finest Moment, 17 Sept. 2003
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
This is the best rap album Ive ever heard. PE come across with the mind of Malcolm X and the aggression of the Manics' Holy Bible album.
This album made Public Enemy, sure, but it also made politics in music defined. Rage Against The Machine would never have happened without this record. Over the duration of the entire album, Chuck delivers nothing less than a perfect lyrical attack on the corruption in America, an african-american Bill Hicks. Chuck leaves no stone unturned, attacking racism, the media, corrupt goverment and many more targets, something that punk rock bands had been doing for years but hadnt cottoned on in rap culture untill PE.
This is also the Bomb Squad's finest moment. They would never produce anything this abrasive and raw again. Cutting up party jams with rock riffs, this is the hardest rap music has ever got.
If you like this, I recommend Chuck D's book, Fight The Power. Boy, the man never calms down, just as p***** off now as ever before.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most influential albums ever, 1 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
The world is pronouncing Rage Against The Machine to be one-of-a-kind geniuses, but without Public Enemy they'd have no career or inspiration. It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back takes the political records of the last fifteen years and renders them completely insignificant.
It doesn't even take hindsight to realize that this record was genius. Chuck D is perhaps the most skilled individual in the rap game. And his skill goes beyond his rhyming skills; his voice is power personified. It digs deep into your soul until you're ready to burst. Then there is Flavor Flav, the clowned prince of rap. His silly rhymes add a lighthearted spirit to the heavy depths that Public Enemy takes you to. The undercurrent is heavy, but a lot is owed to the master of the turntables, Terminator X, who was far ahead of his time. The beats are timeless and the cuts will leave you in awe.
The album boasts front to back classic tracks. Not one track goes by where you don't miss a line that is so significant that every band in the world is sampling it today, so significant that Public Enemy would sample themselves within the same record. The first bomb is dropped on "Bring The Noise". Chuck D will turn you out. His voice booms while Flavor Flav agitates him throughout. "Don't Believe The Hype" is an anthem, and though not as groundbreaking as their biggest hit, "Fight The Power", it is still damn meaningful. "Flavor Flav Cold Lampin'" is silly as hell but a complete trip. Flavor has the flavor and it tastes like fun.
Then you take a break for a song or two. "Louder Than A Bomb" starts off calm and tranquil, but Chuck kills that. He is fiery as hell and even madder. And you know Public Enemy doesn't dance around topics; just check out "Caught, Can I Get A Witness". Chuck announces, "Caught, now in court 'cause I stole a beat/ this is a sampling sport," and goes on to bust more heads with, "you singers are spineless/ as you sing your senseless songs to the mindless/ your general subject love is minimal/ it's sex for profit."
"Night Of The Living Baseheads" is the most memorable track from this album, thanks to a crazy video. How could anyone forget the opening: "Here it is/ BAM/ and you say Goddamn/ this is a dope jam"? But the song is deep, not an egotistical journey. They were one of the first groups to kick the world in the ass about the real drug epidemic in the inner cities. As powerful as "Night Of The Living Baseheads" is, it's "Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos" that finds Chuck D pouncing, more pissed off than ever. I can listen to this track over and over again. The plot is a prison escape, and although it's fictional, Chuck still finds a way to take shots at everyone from the federal government to racism.
The album never relents as it gives you a finale of three dynamite militant tracks: "Rebel Without A Pause", "Prophets Of Rage", and "Party For Your Right To Fight". "Party..." is a piece of sampling genius. The rhyming is bone chilling as Chuck D kicks in your right eardrum and Flavor Flav bangs on the left.
Still think Rage Against The Machine is the top of the political mountain? You only need a few lines from "Party..." to realize how wrong you are. Could Rage ever take on such an opponent as Public Enemy does on several occasions in the same song? "This party started in '66/ with a pro-black radical mix/ then at the hour of twelve/ some force cut the power/ and emerged from hell/ it was your so called government/ that made this occur/ like the grafted devils they were," and, "J. Edgar Hoover and he coulda' proved to 'ya/ He had King and X set up/ also the party with Newton, Cleaver and Seale." The album title speaks the truth; It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing the noise....do believe the hype, 7 Mar. 2009
By 
russell clarke "stipesdoppleganger" (halifax, west yorks) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Audio CD)
Influential albums. Well there is The Velvet Underground and Nico( sold little but every one who heard it formed a band is the popular opinion) Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols, Nevermind, Revolver Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From the First Psychedelic Era 1965-1968, Shaft: Original Soundtrack. Then there is the 1988 album from Public Enemy :"It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back".
Following on from their debut "Yo! Bum Rush The Show" ,in itself a notable album, this album took politicised rap to a whole new level. Along with N.W.A. ( whose rhetoric is more plainly aggressive, less socio-political and less lyrical) Public Enemy took the anger and disgust, at the way things were, of the original punk movement but allied it to the booming bass heavy rhythms of the burgeoning hop-hop movement. Sonically it's mighty but lyrically Chuck D ( still for my money the best hip hop vocalist) became the most vociferous and erudite commentator on life as part of the perceived social underclass in the U.S.
The now defunct music magazine "Melody Maker" likened listening to this album as "being beaten over the head in four/four time with a skip" and that's not a bad analogy of what it's like at all. Though in good way. Production team "The Bomb Squad" (Hank Shocklee and Carel Ryder) gave the sound a dense quality like all the instruments are coated in layers of code 5 lead and they also utilised up to 80 samples to create a multi-layered sonic palette comparable to a heavy guitar band using multiple overdubs.
The difference being that this music has a inherent funkiness way beyond the reach of most guitar based bands( unless you include a band like Chic) This is an album that could tear up the dance floor while tearing down the social barriers . It is profane, exciting ,visceral,apoplectic,uncompromising and quite brilliant . It takes the funk edge that crept into a lot of post punk music but ratchets the sound all the way up till the needles straining at the leash. It sounds like revolution but is in fact evolution of sorts. Taking the anti-establishment stance of punk and much post punk and putting it in the socio-economic climate for black Americans Public Enemy whip up a riveting cacophony , a righteous storm.
Along with Consolidated( far more liberal but still well worth hearing ) The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy the Def Jux roster and British rap artists like Fundamental and Blade, Public Enemy are one of the hip-hop bands who still sound fresh and relevant today. They sure do bring the noise. Do believe the hype.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back
It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back by Public Enemy (Audio CD - 2000)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews