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Goldfinger, Special Edition [DVD]
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Goldfinger is directed by Guy Hamilton and adapted to screenplay by Richard Maibaum & Paul Dehn from the novel written by Ian Fleming. It stars Sean Connery, Gert Frobe, Honor Blackman, Shirley Eaton & Harold Sakata. Music is by John Barry and cinematography by Ted Moore.

Operation Grand Slam.

Connery's third outing as James Bond sees 007 investigating the movements of wealthy gold dealer Auric Goldfinger (Frobe). Little does 007 or MI6 know, but Goldfinger is hatching a master plan that will spell disaster for the world's financial climate.

Undeniably the turning point in the James Bond franchise, Goldfinger is also one of the most fondly remembered by the cinema loving public. Here is when Bond not only went go-go gadget crazy, but he also impacted on pop culture to the point the waves created are still being felt today. Bond traditionalists are often irked by the mention of the change Goldfinger represents, and with just cause, because this really isn't Fleming's core essence Bond. Bond has now become a gadget using super agent, a man who laughs in the face of death, a quip never far from his lips. Yet the hard facts are that this Bond is the one the world really bought into, ensuring for the foreseeable future at least, that this type of Bond was here to say. Marketing was high pitched, fan worship became feverish and the box office sang to the tune of $125 million. Toys, gimmicks and collectables would follow, the Aston Martin DB5 would become "The Most Famous Car in the World", in 1964 Bond truly became a phenomenon.

Purely on an entertainment front, Goldfinger delivers royally, the sets, casting and the high energy set-pieces all seep with quality. This in spite of the actual plot being one of the weakest in the whole franchise. As great a villain as Auric Goldfinger is, with a voice dubbed Frobe simply joyous in the role, his motives are rather dull and hardly cause for some worldwide Bondian panic. But the film rises above it to the point it only really registers long after the end credits have rolled. We have been treated to Odd Job (Sakata instantly becoming a Bond villain legend), that laser, the DB5 and its tricks, the delicious Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore (still an awesome name today and still sounding like a character from a Carry On movie), the golf match, Shirley Eaton's golden girl and the ticking time bomb finale played out during the chaotic scenes involving Ken Adams' brilliantly designed version of Fort Knox.

Bond staples also serve the production well, the title sequence is neatly strung together as scenes from the movie play out over a writhing golden girl, who was model Margaret Nolan and who briefly appears in the film as Dink. The theme tune is a blockbuster, sang with gusto by Shirley Bassey and the locations dazzle the eyes as we are whisked to Switzerland, Kentucky and Miami. Stock characters continue to make their marks, with M, Moneypenny and Q (setting in motion the wonderful serious v jocular axis of his "to be continued" relationship with Bond), starting to feel like old cinematic friends. Only let down is Cec Linder's turn as Bond's CIA counterpart, Felix Leiter, gone is the swagger created by Jack Lord in Dr. No, and while Linder is no bad actor, he doesn't sit right in the role, he's looks too world weary. A shame because he is integral to how the plot pans out.

Director Guy Hamilton was helming the first of what would end up being four Bond movies on his CV, he made his mark by bringing more zip and quip to the Bond character. Connery was firmly ensconced in the role of Bond, he was a mega star because of it, but cracks were beginning to appear in how Connery viewed this gargantuan success and the impact it was having on his hopes to be viewed as a serious actor. However, he was signed up for Thunderball, the next James Bond adventure, and Terence Young would return to the director's chair, could they top the success of Goldfinger? 9/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
These were the Golden years for the Bond series. Following from the success of From Russia With Love, Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman made everything bigger and better for Sean Connery's third outing as the superspy. The gadgets, the world peril, the stunts are all stepped up to provide a BIG adventure that thrills all the way.

Bond is drawn into the world of international gold smuggling, and is soon entangled with Auric Goldfinger, another in a long line of memorable Bond villains. Gert Frobe does sterling work as Goldfinger, putting over a performance that imbues the character with a creepiness and ruthless cunning that really makes him believable supervillain. Honour Blackman is an excellent Bond girl, with a strong and pivotal role in the plot. Harold Sakata as Oddjob provides one of the most memorable henchmen, with a bowler hat to die for.

Full of iconic sequences - the girl covered in gold paint, Bond about to be sliced in two by a laser, the attack on Fort Knox, this is a big and entertaining film. It also introduces the famous Aston Martin, and brings Q's gadgets to the fore, which really adds to the fun.

This ultimate edition really is the best version of the film I have owned. The picture has been lovingly restored and cleaned up, and looks amazing. Really, I am not just saying that. It looks superb. The sound has been similarly treated and there is an option to listen to it in 5.1 DTS surround, which is truly exceptional.

As well as the superb presentation of the film, there is also a host of extras, original trailers, informative audio commentaries and the such. These are exhaustive and some of them quite interesting, especially the featurette on the Aston Martin DB5. But these really a garnish for the main course, which is the film itself.

This is an excellent release, and does this classic film justice. This series of `Ultimate editions' really sets the standard for film releases. It really does not get any better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 6 June 2009
What to say about Goldfinger? Some people say its the beginning of the end for the Bond films as the gadgets and special effects start to take over. Well I don't agree as was shown with 2006's Casino Royale its quite possible to reinvent Bond after some frankly very dull years.

Goldfinger has a classic opening and memorable scenes galore (sorry for Pun). Sean Connery has never been beaten as Bond, his screen presence and charisma, not to mention underrated acting ability keep him at no. 1. Harold Sakata as Oddjob was the best henchman, even beating the enormous Jaws. Sakata was an Olympic weightlifter and at the time of making Goldfinger weighed a little over 20 stone, a large proportion of which was muscle!

If that isn't enough the Bond girls are as lovely as ever. The stunts and gadgets in this film did raise the bar. The sets are spectacular, especially the recreation of Fort Knox at the end. Nobody knew (at that time anyway) what the inside of Fort Knox looked like. Apparently after seeing the film a senior person from Fort Knox wrote to the designer of the set to contratulate him on his imagination.

Which leads me nicely onto the disc of extras. Pretty good would be my summary. There are a couple of short documentaries which are worth watching. Some interviews and commentary tracks, which I've not had a chance to listen to yet as well numerous small trailers and the like.

So this 2 disc re-issue of Goldfinger is well worth getting. Sad thing is the bluray is going to look so good I think I may have to replace this!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Appropriately enough the first of the series to have a really imaginative use of colour, Goldfinger is in many ways the most visually sensual of the films, the unforgettable image of Shirley Eaton's golden girl reflected in a golden glow to much of Ted Moore's cinematography. It's oozing with striking and surreal imagery, from Oddjob's menacing shadow on the hotel room wall, to the little old lady with machine gun or Bond making his entry by unzipping his wetsuit to reveal an evening one underneath. Ken Adam's production design is his possibly his finest hour, genuine architecture of the imagination that is at once both fantastic and strangely credible, maintaining a sense of scale and verisimilitude by his use of ceilings on the smaller sets.

It's also the one that set the Bond formula in stone, something that would later become more a hindrance than a help to the series before something more radical was attempted with Casino Royale. Aside from establishing the trend for irrelevant but enjoyable pretitle sequences, it is from here on that the gadgets begin to assume a more prominent role. However, unlike most of the Roger Moore efforts, they are no match for Bond's own wits - even the famed Aston Martin DB5 does not save him. After putting it through its paces, he is left to his own initiative.

There is no getting away from the overtly sexist approach here ("Dink, say goodbye to Felix - man talk."). Even Blackman's villainy seems inextricably linked to her lesbianism ("You can turn off the charm, I'm immune") but one good one from Bond and she's on the side of the angels.

As with all Bond films, many of the cast are dubbed - in this case, Frobe was dubbed by actor Michael Collins. Regardless, his Auric Goldfinger is easily the best of the Bond super-villains, and comes equipped with the best line in the series as Bond, strapped down in front of the laser beam (in the novel it was a chainsaw), asks if he expects him to talk: "No Mr Bond, I expect you to die." And for possibly the only time in the series, you think that maybe Bond really has had it. Incredibly enjoyable and one of the best-paced entries in the series, it's not hard to see why this is many people's favorite Bond film. It may be formulaic, but then the formula still worked wonders.

While all the extras from the previous release have been carried over, there are not as many new features as you might expect. Most interesting are Theodore Bikel and Tito Vandis' screen tests as Goldfinger, but there are also somewhat awkwardly presented archive interviews with Connery and Honor Blackman as well as a featurette about the Aston Martin DB5, though perhaps the most enjoyable remain the radio spots from the original release.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This is the point where the Bond series really fired into action-terrific stunts, explosive action, good set pieces, memorable villains, car chases, gadgets, and feisty, strong willed women. Probably deserving of being called the best Bond movie, though it is not my favourite, as it has everything a Bond movie should have. It also stands beside other action films for its excitement levels, is full of one-liners and memorable images, and has a very good plot and strong performances from everyone.

Bond is investigating a gold smuggler, in a brief turn away from the full blown SPECTRE plots of previous films, and uncovers a plan to destroy the world's economy. Bond meets Auric Goldfinger, the man believed to be responsible, and soon is struggling to stop the plan and save the world.

Goldfinger has many famous moments which have become more than simply memorable movie scenes- The Jill Masterson 'turns to gold' scene, the 'Shocking' bath moment, the famous Aston Martin's ejector seat scene. The laser scene. Pussy Galore, as her name may suggest is Bond's 'girl' this time, and is easily the strongest female character to date in the series. We have Oddjob, a terrifying silent assassin who uses his steel rimmed bowler hat to dispatch of his enemies, one of the best bad guys in any Bond movie, and Goldfinger himself is the archetypal Bond Villain- smart but...dumb. The theme tune is one of the strongest, and the film made sure that Bond had a place in movie and cultural history.

The DVD has sparkling visuals restored for modern viewing, and the same can be said for the sound. The 2nd disc is full of interesting features which will satisfy all Bond fans- from the nerds to the passing enthusiasts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
These were the Golden years for the Bond series. Following from the success of From Russia With Love, Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman made everything bigger and better for Sean Connery's third outing as the superspy. The gadgets, the world peril, the stunts are all stepped up to provide a BIG adventure that thrills all the way.

Bond is drawn into the world of international gold smuggling, and is soon entangled with Auric Goldfinger, another in a long line of memorable Bond villains. Gert Frobe does sterling work as Goldfinger, putting over a performance that imbues the character with a creepiness and ruthless cunning that really makes him believable supervillain. Honour Blackman is an excellent Bond girl, with a strong and pivotal role in the plot. Harold Sakata as Oddjob provides one of the most memorable henchmen, with a bowler hat to die for.

Full of iconic sequences - the girl covered in gold paint, Bond about to be sliced in two by a laser, the attack on Fort Knox, this is a big and entertaining film. It also introduces the famous Aston Martin, and brings Q's gadgets to the fore, which really adds to the fun.

This digitally restored edition really is the best version of the film I have owned. The picture has been lovingly restored and cleaned up, and looks amazing. Really, I am not just saying that. It looks superb. The sound has been similarly treated and there is an option to listen to it in 5.1 DTS surround, which is truly exceptional.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 6 September 2007
You could almost say that this film so perfectly nails what the Bond series was to become about that many of the films that follow can certainly be said to take their themeic inspiration from this one.

In fact it's so good that we can ignore the fact that Gert Frobe's performance as Auric Goldfinger had to be dubbed due to his lack of English...ignore the fact that Pussy Galore's character is watered down almost to the point of pointlessness...ignore the fact that Bond spends most of the film under Goldfinger's house arrest (with no real reason for Goldfinger not killing him much sooner)...

But what we do have is excitment and a plot that improves on the book's. In the book Goldfinger was to detonate an atomic bomb to break open the gates of Fort Knox. Here his intention is to set the bomb off, thus rendering the gold in there untouchable and therefore increase the value of his own gold.

There are so many moments in the film that are in the most fondly remembered by aficianado's and casual fans alike. Oddjob killing people with his bowler hat, the round of golf between Bond & Goldfinger (which incidentally is 10 times more exciting than Casino Royale's Poker game), Bond tied to a bench as a laser moves closer and closer to his family jewels, Shirley Eaton smothered in gold paint.

It might not be the absolute best in the series, but it is one of the most remembered and memorable. And to this day it remains a triumph.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 11 October 2003
This is a must for any self-respecting Bond fan - the ultimate in the series!
Pussy Galore has to be the best Bond-girl, Gert Frobe is the best villain and Connery, of course, is the best Bond - no contest there!
Be blown away by the power of Shirley Bassey's voice, by the fantastic plot, the wonderful script, great casting and most definitely by 007's sexy smile (especially in that infamous aeroplane scene with Pussy Galore).

This is the Bond film with the best 007 to villain repartee -
Bond: "Do you expect me to talk?"
Goldfinger: "No Mr Bond, I expect you to die!"
Buy it now and you won't ever have to wait for it to come on TV ever again! As soon as you get it delivered, put it in the DVD player, sit back and be sure that you won't be disappointed!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 13 December 2009
Picture great. Sound could be slightly louder. But overall first class. There are a few interesting features as well, in particular one about the Aston Martin DB5 narrated by the bloke once in charge of selling them.

I recommended this title for your collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 28 June 2009
If From Russia With Love, the previous movie in the series, is ever so slightly the better film, the one that set the template for all the James Bond movies to come was Goldfinger, an iconic piece of 1960s' pop culture that saw Sean Connery and the entire Bond team at the top of their creative game. Full of iconic moments, great lines, strong lead performances, and well-handled action, it is a Bank Holiday TV perennial. However, all this is achieved despite some silly continuity errors, illogical events, dire casting choices (Cec Linder's KFC-munching Felix Leiter is especially annoying, bearing no resemblance whatever to the previous portrayal in Dr. No by Jack Lord) and the fact that Bond doesn't actually do anything to resolve the plot (he's kidnapped by Goldfinger before the halfway mark and stays captive until the CIA defuse the atomic bomb at the end). But these complaints will be treated as hogwash by Bond experts; if From Russia With Love is the critics' favourite, Goldfinger is the fans' favourite.
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