Customer Reviews


4 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing album heard by the privileged few..., 3 Nov. 2004
By 
Mr. P. Hallows (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Desert Sessions, Vol. 1 & 2 (Audio CD)
Desert sessions volume 1 (Instrumental driving music for felons) and volume 2 (status: ships commander butchered) are the results of a lost musicians desire to create a new era. Ex-Kyuss songwriter and one-time Screaming Trees guitarist Joshua Homme found himself at a junction, let Kyuss be his crowning moment or fight for a greater glory, Desert Sessions 1&2 was the first step towards the latter.
Assembling a band of brilliant underdog musicians and piling into a recording studio no-where out in the scorched Californian desert, Homme did what none of his past bands allowed him to do, collaborate and experiment. Featuring the mental inflictions of Brant Bjork, Dave Catching, Pete Stahl, Fred Drake and other like minded souls, the album creates a world never visited before, a planet in a David Lynch universe ravaged by psychedelic storms.
The album crackles into life with a grainy amen to Satan from a despairing worshipper [1; Preachin],With its completion, we're straight into a haunting rock marathon laced with eerie keys and nightmare guitar, steaming along to a frantic beat with a sinister undertow of minimalist bass [Track 2; Girl boy Tom]. A prog rock tribute follows with Dave Catchings love of antique synth sounding off to soaring melancholy guitar, reminiscent of Rick Wakemans broodiest moments [Track 3; Monkey in the middle). Track four [Girl boy Tom] acts as an extended reprise to 'Monkey in the middle', the three opening tracks playing like the soundtrack to a trilogy of shorts about a junkie going to a high only to come back down to find himself in a graffiti laden public restroom.
'Cowards way out' [Track 5] whilst not being to dissimilar to its album precursors, has more melodic guitar riffs and easier dynamics, with a sound that will be familiar to fans of 'Queens of the stone ages' self titled debut album. Down-beat Californian rock slowly builds to rapid drumming and trade mark Homme guitar warbling without becoming too excitable or breaking the albums atmosphere.
'Robotic lunch (alt. version)' [Track 6] is perhaps the most unusual (and slightly disappointing) musical jaunt on the album signifying the end of Volume 1, its odd romping pace and bending bass notes could be the accompaniment to any 1950's android flick.
Volume 2 leaps into force with sixties dance guitar and classic rock and roll drumming and also the first track to feature vocals, with Josh Homme's softly sung metal moans and some harmonious choir choruses (The sound of a proto 'Eagles of death metal'). 'Johnny the boy' [Track 7] shows a lighter touch to the album and makes for an unexpected (yet not unpleasant) break.
'Screamin' eagle' [Track 8] opens like a 'pink-floyd'esque power epic, with a reuse of vocal choruses and an infusion of grungy and stadium guitar working, blasting into roof-raising organ cumulating in a grinding sound off between the various instruments. Above all, this track remains a personal favourite of mine, a real wall of sound generated to great effect.
'Cake' is the 9th and last musical track of the desert session musical odyssey, it also stands as the longest recording at over 9minutes in length. Opening like a true death metal track, Pete Stahl's growling vocal dirge screams over a wailing guitar, this gives way to high keys and rhythmic percussion with the laid back sound of porn-groove rock. Moving into short riffs and stripped down jazz alike beats the album gently plays down to wrap itself up.
A familiar preacher ends the album with a chastising of the 'Mans ruin' label to the stripped down sound of blues guitar. Amen.
Whilst this album may not be to every ones tastes, it isn't as mainstream or accessible as Hommes other projects, it will be enjoyed by those who like their rock to have an unexplored edge. For me, this album is sheer brilliance, as a big fan of 'Queens of the stone age' 'Kyuss' and other more sinister rock bands, its unusual compositions and recipes for doom strike an instant chord within. The real tragedy is that 'Mans Ruin' records are now defunct and this album is no longer in press, but for those lucky few who get to hear this album, they will agree that it is a bizarre masterpiece. It is truly the sound of a distant future, echoing back to us from far away, and stands alone from the vastly different other desert sessions, my only sadness is that this is too unique, and I will never hear anything like this for a long, long time...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Experimental & intriguing, 7 Jan. 2009
By 
Tom Chase (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Desert Sessions, Vol. 1 & 2 (Audio CD)
If you are looking through the early Desert Sessions releases then chances are you're a fan of some of the members. And certainly these EPs prove to be interesting listens. I've always deemed them as something of an experiment, an alter-ego for Homme and his friend musicians. Interesting yes, but not totally satisfying. Throughout the sessions many songs are more ideas than finished articles, and many of these ideas later blossom into full on songs, particularly with the latest QOTSA output. More recent Desert Sessions hold up consistently and can be treated as more a finished article.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good stuff if you can get it...., 6 Jan. 2006
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Desert Sessions, Vol. 1 & 2 (Audio CD)
i was lucky enough to find a copy of this relatively cheaply (compared to the people trying to flog it at about 300 quid at the moment...insanity) and was pretty darn pleased with it. the first thing i heard was the preaching skit (obviously, cuz its the first track) and wondered what i'd let myself in for. I've learned that Josh Homme and his mates like putting random stuff like that on their albums, specially the less commercially successful stuff like the Desert Sessions series, so i wasn't surprised really. But this bit (there's another at the end) isn't indicative of what's to come. The rest of the album is pretty cool, psychedelic, something like that. I really liked all of it when i first listened to it, which didn't happen with any of the other volumes. Most of the songs are instrumental and a bit crazy, especially Robotic Lunch which sounds like they can't be arsed to play their instruments properly anymore, which is also something Homme seems to like doing every now and then. I can't really think of something to compare it to, but there is something out there. This review's probably pretty vague and i doubt its usefulness, but i do think this is worth getting. Just don't go crazy over the price.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A classic, 26 April 2006
By 
John Mcgruther (Glasgow) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Desert Sessions, Vol. 1 & 2 (Audio CD)
If you like Kyuss and related bands, I'm sure you'd like this. I wonder if it might be a bit prog-rock or 70s-sounding for some fans of subtle, gentle indie rock, mind you. A very strong album - to me, there isn't a single weak moment on it - they've made a lot more effort with this one than with most of the Desert Sessions recordings. Warm, fuzzy, feelgood....it sounds like it was recorded on somewhat antique equipment. The song order is great too - it gives the album a sense of flow from one place to another. Listening to this feels like a giant hash trip at a someone's party in California in 1970. What is it about those guys from Kuyss - they have this uncanny Midas touch where everything they do is imbued with this effortless cool. (And by the way, I love Robotic lunch - bloody hilarious!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Desert Sessions,  Vol. 1 & 2
Desert Sessions, Vol. 1 & 2 by Desert Sessions (Audio CD)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews