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115 of 117 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highlights from the TNG series
In case there was any doubt, this 6-disc DVD box set contains all ten TV Movies produced as part of the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" series. They are not to be confused with the theatrical films "Generations" through "Nemesis". In each case, these are two episodes from the TV series (often a season cliffhanger and its resolution) presented in their "feature length"...
Published on 30 Aug 2003

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Box is terrible!
Where should I start...?
Outer shell:
It is made of rubberized plastic which will in a couple of years time start to fall apart... mine started to peal of and became sticky as tar! It sticks to whatever is near it, it became all covered with dust... it looks awful! I had to dip it boiling solution of detergent for a few hours till I got that damaged surface...
Published 9 months ago by L. Koprivica


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115 of 117 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highlights from the TNG series, 30 Aug 2003
By A Customer
In case there was any doubt, this 6-disc DVD box set contains all ten TV Movies produced as part of the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" series. They are not to be confused with the theatrical films "Generations" through "Nemesis". In each case, these are two episodes from the TV series (often a season cliffhanger and its resolution) presented in their "feature length" format, which means they are edited together as one 88 minute show with no "To Be Continued..." legend and no end credits separating parts I and II. These were also produced in this format on individual VHS cassettes long ago.
This set will therefore give a fine summary of The Next Generation's seven years, from the pilot to the series finale, for those who do not wish the expense of all seven season boxsets. They are, however, all the big action spectacles without the low-key cerebral stand-alones.
Notable highlights include the acclaimed "Best of Both Worlds" with the ultimate Borg invasion leading to the greatest of the show's cliffhangers - Captain Picard's assimilation and attack on the Enterprise. Also worthy of mention is the appearance of Ambassador Spock on Romulus as one of several original series corss-overs in "Unification", Picard's interrogation by Cardassians in a fine turn for actor Patrick Stewart in "Chain of Command", and of course the outstanding journey through the past, present and future in the climactic finale "All Good Things...".
However, there are a few that do not quite live up to these high standards with "Time's Arrow" as an unsatisfying if amusing adventure to 19th Century Earth, and "Birthright" as a rather slow paced, uneven mix of Worf and Data character stories that could have been condensed to a single episode. Still, together they are all great adventures from a truly great series.
In terms of special features, the sixth disc offers another TV Movie, "Emissary", which was the pilot for the superb spin-off series "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" and featured a special appearance by Patrick Stewart. There is also a fun documentary hosted by actor/director Jonathan Frakes (Riker) entitled "Journey's End" which is now around eight years old and has been broadcast on terrestrial television. It offers a look back across the series, brief interviews with cast and crew, behind the scenes shots of "All Good Things" and a bit of a teasing lead up to the 1995 theatrical movie "Star Trek Generations". Interesting content but it clearly shows its age. In addition, there are trailers for the DS9 release on DVD, TV spots for each episode, and trailers for Star Trek feature films numbers I-VII. All in all, nothing to entice owners of these two-parters on other formats, but ample sustenance for the new-comer.
Full episode list...
DISC 1: Encounter at Farpoint, The Best of Both Worlds; DISC 2: Redemption, Unification; DISC 3: Time's Arrow, Chain of Command; DISC 4: Birthright, Descent; DISC 5: Gambit, All Good Things; DISC 6: Emissary, Special Features
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars CHOICES, TRUST & REALITY, 17 Oct 2001
By A Customer
"SUDDENLY HUMAN" puts Captain Picard in a position that he has never felt comfortable in, yet the veteran captain still succeeds in his mission.
After finding the wreckage of a Talarian vessel, the crew discover a human teenage boy on the ship, Jono. Jono has been living with the Talarians since he was a child and does not want to be kept on the Enterprise. The crew learn that Jono's real name is Jeremiah Rossa, and that his grandmother is Admiral Connaught Rossa. Despite Picard's uncomfortable nature around children, he decides to take Jono under his wing and teach him about human life...he even goes as far as to allow Jono to stay with Picard in his quarters. This action proves near-fatal as Jono stabs Picard during the night. Jono's "father" comes looking for him, but Picard feels that Jono should be returned home to his grandmother where he belongs. This displeases Jono and he threatens the crew. Picard eventually realizes that Jono has the right to choose where he wants to live.
The reason I enjoyed this particular episode was because I got to learn that it's important to respect other people's choices, even if it's a bad choice.
After reading the preview of "LEGACY", I was keen to compare Ishara Yar with her sister, Tasha, when I got to see the episode. There was definitely a resemblance between the two. The Yars came from a colony on Turkana IV where constant fighting between the two factions was a fact of life. Due to these circumstances, these two girls became warriors themselves, learning to fight to the end for their cause. Unfortunately, Ishara's cause was one of hate. Tasha was killed in "Skin of Evil" three years earlier.
The Enterprise enters orbit around Turkana IV to rescue two Starfleet crewmen who have crashed landed on the planet. Great caution is taken due to the constant war going on between the Alliance and the Coalition. The away team meet Ishara and Data is especially interested to hear her opinion of Tasha. Ishara tells the crew that she thought that Tasha was a coward for running away from the fight, but Picard strikes back explaining that he has never met a more courageous woman than Tasha.
Doctor Crusher performs an operation on Ishara that will allow her to enter into enemy territory in order for the away team to recover their missing crew. But Ishara betrays them and turns off the oppositions defenses in order for her party to enter their territory.
The best part for me was in the last scene where Data speaks to Riker about trust and explains how Ishara betrayed his trust. Riker explains that despite the risk involved with trusting someone, he is still willing to put himself out everytime.

"REMEMBER ME" puts Doctor Crusher under pressure once again where she is forced to think her way out of a problem that she's in.
Wesley's warp bubble experiment turns hostile when his mother is caught in the experiment and transferred into another reality where the crew begin to disappear.
Slowly the crew count becomes less and less, until it's only Crusher left on the ship. After doing some research she realizes that she is caught in this bubble and that it is collapsing. Meanwhile in our reality, the Traveler appears in Engineering and assists Wesley in retrieving his mother from the warp bubble before it completely collapses and kills her.
The Traveler will eventually be the one who convinces Wesley to leave Starfleet and seek his fortune elsewhere in "Journey's End".
It's not very often that the women of Star Trek (before Voyager) get put in pressure situations, so I was glad when this episode was made.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Resistance is futile!, 3 Nov 2003
By 
Steven Hill (Edinburgh, Lothian United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
0674 of 1000 arrived today. Early.
My office-mates watched wide eyed as I removed the Borg Cube from its packaging.
This has to be the best boxed set ever. There are not enough superlatives to describe it.
Having seen almost every episode, I am looking forward to watching them again, and filling in any blanks!
I see already there are cubes up for auction... Tsk. This is a collectors item, for geeks and trekkies to enjoy for years to come. Hordes of aliens could not part me from this collection!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Star Trek As It Should Be!!, 11 Feb 2002
By 
Lorrie (Edinburgh Scotland) - See all my reviews
Season Two of The Next Generation really shines with these episodes in a collection. In true Generation style, we deal with Time Warping, Klingons, and Alien troubles.
"Time Squared" starts us off, with a great episode involving the definate impending destruction of the Enterprise.
While travelling through space, the Enterprise picks up an unpowered shuttlecraft. Within, they are all amazed to find an unconsious Captain Picard, whom they all just left on the bridge, but even he comes to see for himself (I hope he was paid double his salary). The craft's logs are recovered, and the crew witnessess their destruction from the view of the shuttle craft that has come from only six hours into the future!
This episode is what The Next Generation is all about, Time, Space, and everything within. Travelling through space, coming across a shuttle craft from the future, becoming trapped in a space fluctuation (front cover), it still somehow manages to seem real...
"The Icarus Factor" is heavilly based upon both William Riker and Commander Worf. At a space station, the Enterprise picks up a guest: Riker's father, whom he hasn't seen in fifteen years. Unwilling to patch things up, Riker usually tries to avoid his father. Meanwhile, Worf is celebrating the tenth anniversary of his Age of Ascension, so his friends set up a traditional Klingon area in the holodeck with startling results.
This episode deals greatly with family values, without leaving the good space theme of Star Trek. It is one of those episodes which you can just watch without needing any previous knowledge of Star Trek, just an enjoyable experience.
"Pen Pals" features Data again, who becomes the main star of the episode. Unknown to the crew, Data makes friends with a resedent of Drema IV, a planet soon to be destroyed by natural causes. Meanwhile, Wesley is put in charge of a research team monitoring the planets. When Data's friend is found out, Picard finds he has a very difficult request to answer.
A very homely and family feel comes with this episode, and a general sence of 'that's how it should be'. The episode makes all the right moves in all the right places.
An addition to the Star Trek collection that certainly shouldn't be missed! It has a great range for everyone who wants something different, and still manages to stick with the Star Trek experience. Enjoy it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Romulans!, 13 Feb 2001
By A Customer
Well, it's been a long time since I saw these, but 'The Defector' is one of my all-time favourites. The Shakespearian parallels are marvellous, and this was a time when Romulans were given personalites and were made into characters, instead of just your typical 'Alien of the Week'. It's an episode with a real dilemma in it and there are consequences for either choice. Due to that this is quite probably the best episode pre 'Best of Both Worlds'.
'The Hunted' is one of those nice runaround episodes that are enjoyable to watch but are really just fluff. However this one manages to turn the fluff into something a little more tangible: its another dilemma, but this time it never really is resolved, at least not on screen. And so detracts or adds to the episode, depending on your view. The idea of 'supersoldiers' is not a new one, and was not new even when this was made, but the Trek treatment manages to give it plenty of poignancy.
For some strange reason 'The High Ground' was banned in the UK, for a while at least, due to some reference to Ireland. This episode is flawed as terrorism and warfare are not the same thing as is suggested here. And while supposedly confronting those issues, it actually manages to make a complete mess of them, and successfully confuses the viewer. Missable.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some of the Best, 27 Sep 2000
By A Customer
These four episodes have some of the most interesting plots in Trek history. Picard with a girl, is that really befitting of a Starfleet captain, especially one who doesn't even like kids! Vash will be in for a surprise or two! The tin-man was a bit of a let down though, a betazoid who cannot handle the emotional stress of those around him. The Betazoids have been doing it for years - why can't he cope?
And as for Reg Barclay, how ... does he go from what we see in this episode to becoming a very important character in later years. A good episode though, especially for those who like Deanna Troi!
As for the Most Toys, some very clever knowledge of starfleet ships and procedures allows fajo to successfully kidnap Data, leading his crewmates to believe that he is dead. We see Data's desire to return to his friends surface in this episode, a quality that most androids would seem to lack. I guess Data was more human than he was ever given credit for
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great mix of exciting and funny TNG episodes, 19 Oct 2001
Manhunt: A really funny episode, thanks to Lwaxana Troi, who searches the whole ship to find a husband. Even Worf has to watch out.
Emissary: A great episode for all fans who like klingons, especially Worf. Here we finally get to know something about his past.
Peak Performance: This one's probably the funniest or at least one of the funniest episodes of TNG. Sirna Kolrami (Roy Brocksmith) brings so much humour into this episode. Towards the end the episode takes an unexpected turn. It gets quite exciting and puzzling.
Shades of Gray: I can recommend this episode to everyone who has missed the first two seasons, because it is actually a review of all the past episodes. Eventhough it's definitely not the best of the TNG episodes and not too full of new ideas, it is worth watching it.
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47 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended as a Complete Series, 5 Sep 2003
By A Customer
This mammoth 48 disc collection is the entire series of "Star Trek: The Next Generation". What makes this different from just a 7-for-the-price-of-6 offer is that all seven season boxsets are packed together in apt form as an appealing Borg Cube. All come in their own original packaging but are held together in pods within the "MegaCube".
Now, a teary-eyed look back across all seven seasons worth of episodes writing in ridiculous superlatives is just not possible in a short review, and would probably be boring to read. If you are considering buying this product you must know how TNG was a landmark and a fine set of sci-fi standalones. It is also, I believe, the second finest Star Trek series of all despite the fact that a great many fans would name it their favourite.
The first year was all about finding its feet, and although the stories were far from perfect, there is a certain nostalgia attached to the bright sets, young actors, original make-up and spandex uniforms.
Season Two saw a few cast changes, Worf's transfer to security, Geordi into engineering, the (brief) arrival of Dr Pulaski, and of course Riker's beard. However, it still appears the worst as well as the shortest season with few original episodes and even the dreaded clip-show born out of necessity due to a writers' strike.
From there on the show went from strength to strength with thoughtful science fiction charting the human condition and plenty of action and spectacle to go alongside. However, the series was not perfect with some characters decidedly shallower than others, a lot of technobabble, one too many "red-shirts", and Troi's predilection for stating the obvious being practiced all too frequently. Nevertheless, the episodes all age extremely well and four (mostly) successful movies were spawned for further enjoyment after ending the TV adventure on a high note. Still, the best was yet to come with sequel series "Deep Space Nine" which stands at the top of the pile as a largely preferable mix of galactic story arcs, rich, complex characters and serial storytelling.
Special features come aplenty on the last disc of each set, including interviews from cast and crew (both from the time and retrospectives), analyses of key characters, overviews of the stories told each year as well as the production involved, behind the scenes featurettes and several other interesting glimpses of the world you don't see. Certainly plenty to get through and most of it interesting, not a load of dull visual effects walkthroughs.
The set is indeed expensive, but is cheaper than spreading out the payments individually over a period of months and years -- you do save money in the long run. If you were going to buy a few sets anyway and have the money to spend, then go ahead. It's a fantastic way to own the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Three Excellent Star Trek Stories, 15 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Vol. 3.1 - Evolution / The Ensigns of Command / The Survivors [VHS] [1990] (VHS Tape)
'Evolution' is mainly focused on Wesley and the trouble he gets himself into during a school experiment which, through negligence, goes wrong and in turn causes the Enterprise's systems to malfunction. An all round good episode which has it's funny moments when the ship's systems begin to act strangely!'The Ensigns of Command' is a Data-rich story. He is sent on an emergency mission to a federation colony all by himself to solve the crisis that has arisen on the planet. While he is there, Data has to use his own ingenuity, innovative ideas and unconventional methods to solve the entire colonies's predicament. If you're a Data fan, you'll love this episode and see a side of him not seen before!'The Survivors' is one of those 'mystery' episodes. It keeps you intrigued right up to the end. It also shows Picard's persistence as a captain to get to the bottom of things. It is a fine episode that resonates the classic Star Trek of the 1960's.All in all, these are three good, solid Star Trek stories to enjoy over and over.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Klingons, The coolest Riker & Data's hardest times, 23 Dec 2000
Forget the Pulaski ageing episode, set your remote control to Fast Forward, and prepare to board the Klingon Bird of Prey Pagh, as Riker butts heads with it's crew and the rash captain Kargan, and is ultimately faced with being engaged in battle... against the Enterprise! plus some delicious Rokeg Blood Pie and the Delicious Gagh (always best when served live). This is the Riker whom should have remained throughout the series... charismatic, bold, and butt-kicking... but instead, he grew fatter, blander and faded into the backdrop in the following seasons...
In 'The Measure of a Man' you will witness how Data's existence is menaced by Starfleet, which considers him not a living being, but instead, a device to study and dissect. Picard must make a desperate defense of Data if he is not to lose his officer to Commander Maddox, of the Daystrom Institute
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