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21
4.3 out of 5 stars
Lou Reed
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£3.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Well, what can i say? The Velvet Underground are no more and what can a poor Lou do? Record some of the most well written and beautifully crafted songs ever, that's what!
This CD features new songs and tunes that Lou was obviously toying with in the Velvets. Although I can appreciate that the playing on this album could be considered a bit "session-y",there is some suberb interplay between the musicians.Check out "Berlin",and wallow in the sad,loose play-off between guitar and piano, not to mention the fantastic holding of the rhythm section.
The lyrics on this album are absolutely suberb,every song has meaning and emotion,a great songwriter at the height of his ability.
I can get into this album so easily, and can wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone who needs "a soundtrack of their lives", because, believe me, when you listen to these songs,you will remember the scene you're going through.I hope it's happy, but if not, you'll remember the time with fondness.Godbless.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 10 December 2001
The version of ocean here is stunning, the VU never did manage to get the rolling wave effect so well, tho I like the VU version too! I think this is superior to "transformer" but it failed on the marketing. Yeah many velvet songs here but same can be said of "transformer" and this is reall a very gentle and dignified record that deserves to be heard more often!
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 24 October 2003
Finally, I made the transition from my old album/tape to the CD - digitally remastered it says on the cover - not that that really means anything. A slightly "cleaner" sound perhaps, but not a lot more - half of the appeal of Lou is the slightly rough edge and the occasional distortion and feedback creeping in. However, what prompted me to write, was simply that the liner notes are just so depressing. This IS a GREAT Lou Reed album.
I was 15 I think when this album came out. I'd missed slightly the golden Velvet Underground years being too young too fully appreciate what it all meant at the time. But as such, and coming to it slightly later, I didn't find my musical taste boxed in by fashion or hype. I bought what I liked - and I liked the Velvet Underground, bought all the albums, and at school at the time, few others did; that made it all more meaningful.
As it turns out, with the illumination that hindsight provides, we now know that most of these tracks, if not all of them, were reworks of Velvets numbers. Lisa says surfaced on the 1969 double live album, and most of the remainder has surfaced since. But unless you had been to Velvets concerts at the time, you didn't really know that.
What this album provides is a bridge, and a beautiful one at that between the passing of the Velvet Underground and Lou out on his own. Whilst it could be argued that Lou Reed has never quite achieved the brilliance of the VU years i.e. the sum was far greater than the individual parts, I often feel that the more sensitive side of the VU is often overlooked. Heroin and the heavier material tends to dominate because at the time it was so outrageous, so real and so true. But Reed also turned out Sunday Morning, I'll Be Your Mirror and Pale Blue Eyes to name but a few. It wasn't all drone, feedback and noise and for me "Lou Reed" reflects that.
Had Dylan written this album (or Reed had recorded it in 78 or 2003), it would have been heralded as one of his best: from Wild Child - "I was talking to Chuck, in his Ghengis Khan suit and his wizards hat" is pure Dylan. Sparkling. Sing it with a hairbrush for a mike and some air guitar, curl your lip and be Lou Dylan for 5 minutes. I Can't Stand It and Walk It Talk It really do rock - but it could have done with a much harder, LOUDER mix. Lisa Says we now know about, and Berlin was a taster of what was to come, but perhaps more poignant and sensitive than the version on Berlin itself. The real highlights though, in an album full of them for reasons that weren't so obvious at the time, are Going Down, I Love You and Ride into the Sun. Interwoven into these songs is Lou's own narrative of what he was feeling at the time - perhaps all songs are like that. Looking back, looking forwards, reflection, the pain of loss, wanting to set the record straight and perhaps even homesickness for New York - to me, it's all there in this record. As Lou said himself later on, "the records were letters" and a lot of the songs "difficult for us to do badly"; as this record proves though, equally difficult to do well!
Every rock fan should have this album. It's every bit as good as what the Stones or anyone else was doing at the time and it doesn't really have a bad track on it - but that's also it's problem - it doesn't have a REALLY great track on it either. That in itself is staggering, but after what had gone before (so many favourites to choose from) there was nothing Reed could have done to make his first solo effort a real success. It's all summed up in a line from Ride Into the Sun - "Looking for another chance, someone else to be...." - yeah Lou, a lot of us are still looking. BUY IT!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 20 April 2006
Though now thought of as one of the most influential bands ever, it's easy to forget just how little commercial success the Velvet Underground saw before Lou Reed departed.Thus very few people took notice of this, his debut album.The fact that it was badly mastered and produced didn't endear the few who took the plunge.This remastered version pitched to the public 3 decades on is caught in the trap of falling between the heights both before and after that Lou scaled artistically, and in containing songs no longer new to anyone who has bought either V.U., or the 2 disc Velvet Underground Live.

To dismiss this album though would be sheer folly because it contains some pure gems.The cuts brought from the Velvet days, though bearing similar arrangements still shine.Given their evolution how could they fail."I Can't Stand It" rumbles ominously, "Walk And Talk It" struts proudly, "Ocean" is given a fine atmospheric reading, and the " why am i so shy ?" coda in "Lisa Says", must be one of the most sublime moments in music.The new songs are just as good too, "Going Down" is very pretty, the version of " Berlin" is far more affecting than the one on the later album to which it gave it's title, and "Wild Child" is a quintessential Lou Reed song, full of dodgy characters talking " of the rain" and begging for "some spare change".Should not be overlooked.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 June 2013
The first track is disappointing, mainly because the version of "I Can't Stand It" on the VU album is far superior.
Otherwise an awesome debut solo album, the mix of guitar and piano combines brilliantly, especially on "Berlin", which is a fuller, longer version to the title track of the later "Berlin" album.
Lots of female backing vocals, great catchy songs.
The intro of Walk it and Talk It is very similar to Brown Sugar by the Stones.
Wild Child is one of Reed's best songs.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 17 January 2014
An absolute superstar. I hate to use Amazon for all it's abuses of human rights, etc, global monstrosity, but this was through rather than off them, surely better. The smaller businesses have to survive somehow, even if it means using overinflated middleman beasts. Besides which Lou Reed was, and remains, a real God. Keep your Islam, Judaism, Christianity, etc, stick it in fact.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2013
Got the vinyl in the 70's. This to me was an album that was so stunningly good every song hit you it made you feel good a fantastic beautiful album that should be appreciated in itself and not compared to the Velvets.
Ocean is just superb the best version ever, Liza says, Wild Child and the oh so simple I love you,so underated.

So sad that he is gone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This was Lou Reed's first tentative step towards a long-term solo career which is notable for a number of highs.

It is clear that he is still finding his feet and (to some extent) direction, but what we have here is a good album with some great compositions (for example, 'the Ocean' is beautiful) and plenty of promise for the future.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Lou's début solo record, released in 1972, features a number of songs originally written for The Velvet Underground before his departure. Of these, the quirky "Lisa Says" and the dramatic "Ocean" stand out. Elsewhere, there are typical off-beat character studies such as "Wild Child" and rockier fare like "Walk and Talk It". The best track is probably "Berlin", which Lou would revisit in abridged form for the album of the same name the following year. Here it has additional verses and a bridge absent from the later recording (a live version of the "Lou Reed" version of the song may be found on 1979's "Take No Prisoners"). The playing on this record has often been criticised for being stiff and characterless and it is true that the band could swing a little more. Also, the female backing vocals do tend to overwhelm Lou's deadpan delivery a few times. But taken as a whole, this is solid record worth owning.
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on 16 November 2012
For my money, this is Lou Reed's best and definitely most consistent solo album. It's often dismissed as being an album of Velvet Undergound left-overs recorded with a bunch of session musicians. However, what should be remembered is that Reed wrote the best songs of his life with the Velvets and that those session musicians are actually quite good. There isn't a duff track on this album and it's got a very quintessentially 70s sound to it that I really like.
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