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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is The Cure Over The Hill?
Not since "Disintegration" has a cure album affected me in such a deep way. Just when you might doubt he still has it, Robert Smith releases "Bloodflowers;" which is a little irony in itself as the song "39" is about that very doubt. There is something ineffable about The Cure, something that touches our souls. This album is very dark, and...
Published on 21 Feb 2000

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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacklustre final effort from Robert and Gang
Having grown up listening to such great albums as Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me, or Disintegration, it was exciting to hear advance press that The Cure had reverted to what they were best at with Bloodflowers. I'm not sure whether it's because I've grown up or simply moved on, but while the delicious guitar sounds and washes of synth are still very much there, the musicality...
Published on 16 Feb 2000


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is The Cure Over The Hill?, 21 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
Not since "Disintegration" has a cure album affected me in such a deep way. Just when you might doubt he still has it, Robert Smith releases "Bloodflowers;" which is a little irony in itself as the song "39" is about that very doubt. There is something ineffable about The Cure, something that touches our souls. This album is very dark, and ponderously melancholic. To answer the question that many of you have been dying to know, does this album harken back to "Disintegration?" I can answer yes and no. It's dark and very similar to "Disintegration" but different. Robert is philosophical in songs like "Where Birds Always Sing" and is expressive of his feelings, in songs like "The Loudest Sound" and "There is No If," both songs are about the tragic nature of love and life and reminiscent of "Faith" and "Disintegration," but closer to "Disintegration." There are songs that are tragic, angry and sad like "Watching Me Fall" (where we find out that Robert can still hold a note. It reminds me of "Prayers for Rain") and "39." The theme is that we get old, and that nothing lasts forever. It is neither fair nor unfair, most poignantly demonstrated in "Bloodflowers," " The Last Day Of Summer," and "39" which also happens to be Robert's age--hard to believe, yes? I never thought I would see the day when my favorite rock artist would see 40. So is The Cure over the hill? Not, if they keep this up! I know I will be spending many rainy nights with this album. Like "Disintegration" I can't say I have a favorite song. It depends on my mood; one day it might be "The Loudest Sound," another "39" or maybe "Watching Me Fall." This album is profoundly sad, but finds sanctuary in all the gloom offering some hope and solace. One thing for sure is, we can all find hope in that The Cure has recaptured what we liked best about "Disintegration," but has given us something new with "Bloodflowers."
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just My Review....., 22 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodflowers (Audio CD)
The Cure edged into new territory with Wild Mood Swings, but nevertheless drew scorn from certain quarters because it eschewed goth rock for pop, both pure and twisted. For 2000's Bloodflowers, Robert Smith decided to give the people what they wanted: a classic Cure album, billed as the third part of a trilogy begun with Pornography and continued with Disintegration. That turns out to be more or less true, since Bloodflowers boasts all of the Cure's signatures: stately tempos, languid melodies, spacious arrangements, cavernous echoes, morose lyrics, keening vocals, long running times. If that's all you're looking for, Bloodflowers delivers in spades. If you want something transcendent, you're out of luck, since the album falls short of the mark, largely because it sounds too self-conscious. As one song segues into the next, it feels like Smith is striving to make a classic Cure record, putting all the sounds in place before he constructs the actual songs. That makes for a good listening experience, especially for fans of Disintegration, but it never catches hold the way that record did, for two simple reasons: there isn't enough variation between the songs for them to distinguish themselves, nor are there are enough sonic details to give individual tracks character. While Disintegration had goth monoliths, it also had pristine pop gems and elegant neo-psychedelia; with a couple of exceptions, the songs on Bloodflowers all feel like cousins of "Pictures of You." The album is certainly well made, and even enjoyable; however, its achievement is a bit hollow, since it never seems like Smith is pushing himself or the band. Nobody else can come close to capturing the Cure's graceful gloom, but it's hard to shake the suspicion that Bloodflowers could have been something grand if he had shaken up the formula slightly.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A hazily romantic return to form from The Cure:, 22 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
Bloodflowers is The Cure's 20th album in 22 years and is reputed to be the final part in a trilogy begun in 1982 with Pornography and centred around the band's creative highpoint, 1989's Disintegration. Most of what they've released before and after Disintegration inevitably fell under the shadow of its epic, swooning grace. Perhaps wisely, the band have never tried to recreate the elegant mystery contained therein and instead ploughed a lighter furrow throughout the nineties. Until now that is:
Arriving 11 years and seven albums (only two of which containing new material) later, Bloodflowers is a worthy sequel to Disintegration. Clocking in at almost an hour, with only nine tracks, there's little room here for throwaway pop. Every song has been carefully thought out and exceptionally rendered. That unmistakable yearning quality has returned to singer Robert Smith's voice as the music sweeps the listener along in endless innocence. Indeed the whole album feels like a luscious manifestation of childhood dreams and secrets.
Opening track Out of this World is simple yet effective. It builds on a gentle acoustic guitar, reminiscent of Disintegration's Untitled, as Smith wistfully reminisces "when we look back at it all as I know we will, you and me wide eyed. I wonder will we really remember how it feels to be this alive". Better still is The Last Day of Summer, where melodies fall from the sky as Smith laments the changes life forces upon you as you grow older in the most beautifully na´ve way: "Nothing I am, nothing I dream, nothing is new, nothing I think or believe in or say, nothing is true. It used to be so easy, I never even tried".
Elsewhere 39 and, particularly, Watching Me Fall evoke memories of Disintegration's glorious title track. The bitterness and regret are now directed inwardly as Smith cries on 39 "I used to feed the fire, but the fire is almost out. Now there's nothing left to burn". It seems adversity and frustration bring the best out of this band, they've never sounded more alive.
Ultimately Bloodflowers has nothing new to say, and certainly won't win the band many new fans. It is however, a creation of longing beauty that should be treasured alongside Disintegration, Suede's Dog Man Star and Spiritualized's Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space. The Cure have returned to what they do best and long may they continue.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cure at their fearsome best, 31 Jan 2008
By 
Thomas A. Johnson (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
Robert Smith knew exactly what he wanted when he took the band into the studio to record Bloodflowers - and it shows. From the beautifully crafter opener, Out Of This World, one of the greatest Cure songs of all time, to the last anguished yelp of Bloodflowers, this album is obsessively constructed and consistantly magnificent. At the time it came out all the hype surrounding it was that this was to be the last Cure album ever, and it's emotional impact at the time and still to this day is alot to take. Songs like the Last Day of Summer and the Loudest Sound for instance send a shiver down your spine such is the intensity of the lyrics, something that the self titled album of 2004 rarely managed. Bloodflowers is a true masterpiece and a poignant moment in The Cure's history, an album that is so gloriously 'Cure' that it stands on it's own as a work of timeless beauty. Very special.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ghosts Of The Past - Ghosts Of The Future, 5 Mar 2005
By 
Steven T. Jarvis "Skarekrow" (Thanet, Kent) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
Evrey time I listen to this album, and I am listening to it now, it changes and it changes me... it coalesces the various stlyes through which The Cure have migrated through - their past incarnations - to create a uniquelty disquieting, haunting album. It is so much Seventeen Seconds, so much Pornography and Faith, but it is also so very much more than all The Cure were... in 1989 There was Disintegration... which was though to be The Cure's Swan Song, but, 11 years later Bloodflowers bloomed and heralded The Cure's rebirth.

This is all The Cure were... and yet it is so much, so very much more; it is still, obviously the spirit and the esence of who The Cure are, but it is also a style that matured into a terrifying nightmare of love and loss and hope.

Musically and lyrically it is so delightfully hanunting... it lingers in the mind like a dream you just don't want to let go of. Soft, yearning keyboards and harsh, slicing guitars combine to create and dreadful anticipation... catching and killing and resurrecting every aspect of love and leaves you wanting more, always wanting more. Robert Smith's voice seems to have taken on a new and darker tone than ever before... a tone that, combined with those spitting, biting guitars, chews deeper and deeper into me!!! I repeat, this album is so much more than the sum of its parts - it is a haunted house of secrets just waiting, wanting to be found... And it is a rebith, a re-emergence of one of the most profoundly talented bands I have ever had the pleasure of listening to.

I have said this in previous reviews and will say it again... The Cure's ability to evolve, to metamorphosise is part of what makes them so consistently unique; they are not lead by the influences of others because they are the influence to so many others. There are no classic Cure albums: All Cure albums are Clasics in their own right!!!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A combination of The Cure's best styles, without the "pop"!!, 1 July 2002
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
As the years go by, most bands start producing poorer and poorer albums. Quite the opposite is true of The Cure. 23 years after their debut album was released, Bloodflowers is a culmination of everything they do best, bringing their greatest styles and the best songs they have ever written together.
This album was passed over by the media at the time of it's release, mostly due to the lack of publicity given by Polydor. (The Cure refused to allow any singles to be released so Polydor in turn refused to promote the album).
The album kicks off with Out Of This World, a soothing jaunt through New Order-esque (not them again!!!) territory. A lovely shimmering lead-guitar riff plays over summery accoustic guitars and organs and the greatest piano playing you will ever hear takes us into the chorus (it's basically a climb in scale from the left of the piano to the right of the piano, but played very fast and very well!).
Next up is Watching Me Fall. This sees the band returning to the Nirvana-ish sound of the Wish album, with it's extremely distorted guitars and loops of feedback, although at 11:13 in length it's way more accomplished than anything Nirvana ever did (and more "English") sounding. This is the first song where the increasingly used sequencers are noticeable. The use of sequencers builds throughtout the album and while some may bemoan the lack of a "live band" feel I happen to think they embellish the songs a great deal and in fact think they "make" the songs. And after all, this ISN'T a live album....
You'll notice them most on Maybe Someday and on the awesome introduction to 39.
I think Watching Me Fall would have been better as the lead track, but many of the songs have a very similar sound/feel to Out Of This World so I suppose the band didn't want to lump too many similar sounding songs one after the other which is fair enough.
Where The Birds Always Sing goes back to the feel of the first song and reintroduces the orchestra-like synthesiser sound that was prominent on the Disintegration album. Maybe Someday is the first song to lift the tempo a bit and starts off with a cracking lead guitar riff and sequenced drums before the real drums and bass guitar kick in abruptly. It's also got a fantastic backwards whammy-barred-guitar loop that plays throughout the song towards the end of every line Robert sings. I think this is the song that shows The Cure creative use of technology. Most guitar bands use sequencers to make dance songs (or add a dance element). Maybe Someday is very much a true guitar band song with live drums, live guitars, live bass, live keyboards (lovely organ solo which makes a great change from guitar solos!!) but it also has loops of guitar chords playing under the main track, a drum loop (which happens to make the live drums sound even better when they kick in) and other various little noises.
The Last Day Of Summer sees the tempo abruptly drop back to the sound of the first song and it's really got pretty much the same sound, with the now familiar 6-string bass (played as a "lead guitar" sound) and piano.
There Is No If sounds like it was recorded in about 5 minutes simple because there doesn't seem to be many instruments playing on it ! I assume drummer Jason Cooper was on holiday or something when they made this as there are no drums and no noticeable live percussion that he could have played. It's by far the weakest song on the album and I would have been very interested to see how it would sounded if they'd given it more of a "full band" sound. As it is, it sounds like Robert Smith has done it all himself. (Plus I think he's done the whole "I said", "She said" thing on quite enough records now thank you very much !!).
Next is The Loudest Sound for which you may as well just read the comments for the previous song, as no live drums or live bass guitar can be heard and guitarist Perry Bamonte doesn't seem to appear at all (There's only a 6-string bass on this track and it's definitely played by Robert Smith). The only difference is that this song is actually really brilliant so the previous comments don't matter as much.
39 is the "hardest" song on the album, with the awesome sequencer and bass guitar intro, plus the distorted guitars are back!! Again, it's very Nirvana-esque with a bit of a goth edge. The only slight criticism I have is that I think the song could have been a minute or two shorter (it lasts 7:18). It's a fantastic song until it runs it's course, but just at the right moment where they should have ended the track it goes back and does a reprise for a couple of minutes and it's a part of the song that just doesn't have the same feeling of excitement when it's replayed again for the umpteenth time in the song. Perhaps it's irony as the most repeated lyric just happens to be "The fire is almost out and there's nothing left to burn". It is pretty amusing though for such a serious song when he sings "....there's nothing left to burn, not even THIS:" and it launches into a kick-ass guitar solo !!!
Last song is Bloodflowers which happens to be their greatest song ever. Thundering rythmic drums, grinding bass guitar (although I wish it was a bit louder), a spooky keyboard line, hypnotic 6-string bass, an even more spookier middle-8 and the bands best guitar solo since Wish's From The Edge Of The Deep Green Sea.
In all how much you this album will depend on whether you like their poppier or "gloomier" stuff. If it's the latter then it's the greatest album you could ever purchase.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is better than I would expect, 30 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
This album can be listned to over and over again. If you like the sound the Cure make the music is infectious. I bought this album on spec having enjoyed the the rest of the Cure's output and I wasn't disapointed. Roberts Smiths vocal invoke more pathos than most bands can produce in an entire career. If you want a mellow moment get hold of this album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still masters of their own destiny., 2 Feb 2012
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
I don't understand the negativity towards this album from some reviewers. This album is wonderful, deep, passionate, heartfelt and utterly soulful. It rewards you the more you listen to it. It's almost like a prayer, a deep lament, deep within the soul, almost a cry for help. It moves me and there's no higher praise I can afford a work of art such as this. Deserves repeated listens before you " get it "...Bless You Mr Smith and co:!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A relaxing experience..., 18 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
I thouroughly enjoyed this album, from the clean cut guitar sounds and the glistening keyboard sounds in the background, it adds to the atmosphere of the album. If you enjoyed pornography and disintegration, you'll love bloodflowers. It is simply a very relaxing albums, so for all the folks used to the cure's faster songs and happier songs e.g. "Friday i'm in love" and "Just like heaven" may be disappointed. But, I knew what it was going to be like from various reviews. The best song on the album has to be "Maybe Someday", showing what the cure are best at: clean cut guitar progessions and enchanting lyrics from Mr Smith.
A good buy if you are a die-hard cure fan.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An infectious disease, 22 Mar 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodflowers (CD) (Audio CD)
This is an album that everyone should hear, regardless of age or prejudice. While many felt let down by Bob's last effort in '96, this album affirms the greatness that this band always promises. It is both eclectic and still follows a centeral theme. The lyrics seem very honest and the music is undeniably Cure without having to be nostalgic. Put this next to the new Oasis album and you are faced with an album of beauty, agression and melancoly versus an album of crap, generic, limp sub-music. Renew your love of one of Britain's best ever bands.
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