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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Flynn!!!
"They Died With Their Boots On" is a classic. It is has an energy all it own and it gallops unapologetically to its inevitable final. Errol Flynn gives one of his finest performances as General Custer and Olivia de Havilland is irresistible in the part of Libby Custer.

The history portrayed in "They Died With Their Boots On" might be pure Hollywood hokum but it...
Published on 11 July 2007 by nmollo

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2.0 out of 5 stars Misleading Advert.
Did not expect it to be a Korean version with the holder printed in Korean and Korean subtitles in the movie. This was definately not mentioned in the advert for the film.
Published on 13 July 2013 by David Lyall


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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Flynn!!!, 11 July 2007
By 
nmollo (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
"They Died With Their Boots On" is a classic. It is has an energy all it own and it gallops unapologetically to its inevitable final. Errol Flynn gives one of his finest performances as General Custer and Olivia de Havilland is irresistible in the part of Libby Custer.

The history portrayed in "They Died With Their Boots On" might be pure Hollywood hokum but it is still the best film ever made on this subject.

In reality General Armstrong Custer was not a liked man. In fact he was hated by his troops and despised in Washington. During his years on the Indian plains Custer's soldiers suffered terribly under his despotic and inconsistent command. Custer made enemies wherever he went. The final battle at the Little Bighorn and eventual defeat of Custer was primarily because of poor military decisions and circumstantial mistakes.

General "Longhair" Custer was no friend of the victimised Indians having been involved in cold-blooded massacres that included the wholesale killing of their defenceless women and children. The latest biography of Custer paints the man as someone verging on the Psychotic. General George Armstrong Custer was anything but a hero.

This would not do for a Hollywood film. A Hollywood film made and released during Americas involvement in World War II. America needed heroes and Custer was one of them.

That said it is very intelligent script and has some really excellent dialogue. At one point Custer offers a way out of the final battle to his comrade, an Englishman serving with the 7th Cavalry, by giving him a letter to deliver.

BUTLER: Why are you asking me to go back with it?

CUSTER: Well for one thing you're an Englishman, not an American.

BUTLER: Not an American? What to you Yankees thing you are. The only real Americans in this very old parish are on the other side of the hill with feathers in their hair!

This film is an unabashed joy and can be enjoyed for what it really is; a rip roaring adventure on a grand scale.

The DVD has a short documentary on the feature and a Warner Bros cartoon. There is also some period newsreel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A rogue with courage, 4 Sept. 2011
General Custer (a fine looking Errol Flynn) is portrayed as a rogue at West Point (the highest number of demerits) yet he is acknowledged as a very fine horseman and swordsman (useful attributes in the US army at that time; just before the outbreak of the American civil war. There is a poignant scene when the cadet gentlemen of The South decline to swear allegiance to the Union and are dismissed with honour (obviously to participate in the carnage to come). Custer goes on to portray exceptional courage (in leading the charges of the Michigan battalions - three times), on the strength of an accidental promotion. The down-side takes hold with the end of the war and his being removed from the `active list'. He is given a life-line when posted to the Dakotas to honour a treaty with Crazy Horse (played with quiet dignity by Anthony Quinn). As Warner Brothers did so well (irrespective of historical accuracy - as was the case with The Charge of the Light Brigade, in India, rather than the Crimea!), the climax was at the battle of the Little Big Horn. The various charges are stunning. The high cameras capture the Indians' free-flowing tactics, to their deadly effect. The end, we all know about.

Ian Hunter.
Author of The Early Years
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars they died with their boots on., 25 Nov. 2009
By 
Mr. Thomas E. A. Medcraft (Cheshire uk.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: They Died With Their Boots On [VHS] [1941] (VHS Tape)
another great dvd errol flynn and co stars really put this dvd on the map it is enthralling from beggining to end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars To hell or glory, 10 July 2011
By 
Errol Flynn (Custer) graduates from military school but only because the North is desperate for men to join the army to fight the Southern Confederates. His disciplinary record is the worst ever and were it not for the sudden outbreak of war, he surely wouldn't have made it. We follow Flynn's rise through the military ranks until he makes his final stand at Little Big Horn.

The cast are all excellent with the exception of Charley Grapewin (California Joe) who plays one of those comedy drunken wagon drivers who are NEVER funny. He's meant to be an endearing character but he just irritates. There is also an English buffoon thrown in - another cast mis-calculation. But everyone else hits the mark, especially Flynn, Olivia De Havilland as his wife Libby, Arthur Kennedy as his adversary Ned Sharp and Anthony Quinn as Crazy Horse.

There are many good scenes, eg, the confrontations between Flynn and Kennedy regarding the issue of selling alcohol to troops and rifles to the Indians, the final scene between Flynn and De Havilland as he prepares to go into battle for the last time, and the numerous horseback charges that Flynn leads. However, we could do without all the scenes with the stupid wagon driver.

The film has comedy (NOT from the annoying wagon driver), action, drama and good actors that keep you watching despite it's length. Flynn is very likable as Custer and develops his character through to a man of conscience who gives Arthur Kennedy a satisfying pay-back time. What a shame that De Havilland sold Flynn's conditions at the end instead of exposing the corruption that had taken place to the general public. That would have caused the required shame. The Indians are the good guys in this film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Flynn!!!!, 11 July 2007
By 
nmollo (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
"They Died With Their Boots On" is a classic. It is has an energy all its own and it gallops unapologetically to its inevitable final. Errol Flynn gives one of his finest performances as General Custer and Olivia de Havilland is irresistible in the part of Libby Custer.

The history portrayed in "They Died With Their Boots On" might be pure Hollywood hokum but it is still the best film ever made on this subject.

In reality General Armstrong Custer was not a liked man. In fact he was hated by his troops and despised in Washington. During his years on the Indian plains Custer's soldiers suffered terribly under his despotic and inconsistent command. Custer made enemies wherever he went. The final battle at the Little Bighorn and eventual defeat of Custer was primarily because of poor military decisions and circumstantial mistakes.

General "Longhair" Custer was no friend of the victimised Indians having been involved in cold-blooded massacres that included the wholesale killing of their defenceless women and children. The latest biography of Custer paints the man as someone verging on the Psychotic. General George Armstrong Custer was anything but a hero.

This would not do for a Hollywood film. A Hollywood film made and released during Americas involvement in World War II. America needed heroes and Custer was one of them.

That said it is very intelligent script and has some really excellent dialogue. At one point Custer offers a way out of the final battle to his comrade, an Englishman serving with the 7th Cavalry, by giving him a letter to deliver.

BUTLER: Why are you asking me to go back with it?

CUSTER: Well for one thing you're an Englishman, not an American.

BUTLER: Not an American? What to you Yankees thing you are. The only real Americans in this very old parish are on the other side of the hill with feathers in their hair!

This film is an unabashed joy and can be enjoyed for what it really is; a rip roaring adventure on a grand scale.

The DVD has a short documentary on the feature and a Warner Bros cartoon. There is also some period newsreel.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Men die. But a regiment lives on; because a regiment has an immortal soul of its own"...Errol Flynn, 15 Feb. 2011
By 
J. Lovins "Mr. Jim" (Missouri-USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Warner Bros. Pictures presents "THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON" (1942) (140 min/B&W) (Fully Restored/Dolby Digitally Remastered) -- Starring Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Arthur Kennedy, Charley Grapewin, Gene Lockhart & Anthony Quinn

Directed by Raoul Walsh

General George Armstrong Custer (Flynn) is a flamboyant and brilliant cavalry officer, who during the Civil War defies his superiors' orders and becomes a hero as a result. After a period of forced retirement in the postwar years, Custer is put in charge of the 7th Cavalry in the Dakota Territory. Here he whips this ragtag group into spit-and-polish shape, and also does his best to extend a neighborly hand to the local Indian tribes. Custer even goes so far as to promise Chief Crazy Horse (Quinn) that the white man will never set foot in the sacred Black Hills. Alas, Custer is betrayed by greedy gold prospectors, whipped into a frenzy by scheming land speculator Ned Sharp. Forced by circumstances to do battle against Crazy Horse to prevent tribal retaliation, Custer and his command ride towards a rendezvous with destiny at the Little Big Horn on June 25, 1876.

Historical inaccuracies abound but it's a great story and well told!

This film represented the final screen pairing of Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, a fact that lends poignancy to their classic parting scene. Though an extremely long film, They Died With Their Boots On is never dull, especially during the spectacular Custer's Last Stand finale.

BIOS:
1. Raoul Walsh (Director)
Date of Birth: 11 March 1887 - New York, New York
Date of Death: 31 December 1980 - Simi Valley, California

2. Errol Flynn [aka: Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn]
Date of Birth: 20 June 1909, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Date of Death: 14 October 1959, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

3. Olivia de Havilland
Date of Birth: 1 July 1916 - Tokyo, Japan
Date of Death: Still Living

Mr. Jim's Ratings:
Quality of Picture & Sound: 5 Stars
Performance: 5 Stars
Story & Screenplay: 4 Stars
Overall: 4 Stars [Original Music, Cinematography & Film Editing]

Total Time: 140 min on DVD ~ Warner Bros. Pictures ~ (04/19/2005)
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars They died with their boots on /Custers Last Stand, 10 Nov. 2003
By 
Rankin Cattan "rankin_cattan" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: They Died With Their Boots On [VHS] [1941] (VHS Tape)
The story of General George Armstrong Custer and his famous last stand at the Battle of Little Big Horn,stars Errol Flynn,and is I tend to feel a rather glorified version of the actual historical facts ,in saying that it is streets ahead of its more recent made rival Custer of the west with Robert Shaw ,and is a must for Errol Flynn fans .It is worth saying that Flynn starred in The Charge of the Light Brigade and while it again was ficitionalised it is in the sense of its entertainment value a superiour film the later version of the same subject ,Watch and enjoy .
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They Died With Their Boots On, 4 Jun. 2009
By 
C. W. Bradbury (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Starring Errol Flynn in the heroic role of Gen. George Armstrong Custer; and released just prior to America's entry into World War Two in 1941; the purpose of this classic film was to encourage war-fever in America's young manhood. With a Boy's Own version of military training, innumerable magnificent cavalry charges, stirring historical commentary punctuated by thunderous cannon blasts, and the band playing 'Garry Owen' this film certainly does that! The depiction of the Little Big Horn battle is pure legend; the US cavalry surrounded, outnumbered and out of ammunition, faces certain death. With sabre in hand, an indominable Gen. Custer, flag flying and full of the courage that built America, fights on to the inevitable end; shrouding both himself and his men with eternal glory!!! Even the cowardly swindler Sharpe comes good in the end, fights bravely and dies with honour.
This film sticks in the throat of the politically correct brigade, who take every opportunity to criticise both it and Gen. Custer; but to my mind, any man who leads his regiment from the front in more than fifty flatout cavalry charges to defend the country he loves deserves full respect.
I wholeheartedly recommend this film; it's a ripping good yarn!!!They Died With Their Boots On
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5.0 out of 5 stars His best film, 20 April 2013
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As a life long Errol Flynn fan this was an upgrade purchase to replace my VHS copy to DVD. For those who have never seen it, it is a great film albeit with a certain amount of 'Hollywood licence' in actual historical facts. But great fun all the same.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 1 May 2012
By 
RA Shaw (Wakefield, England) - See all my reviews
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Even though this film is over 70 years old it still doesn't fail to move. Rousing action, a moving score and a tender love story played out by Flynn and DeHavilland, it is a total delight.
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