Customer Reviews


143 Reviews
5 star:
 (109)
4 star:
 (22)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant (Has to be one of the greatest films ever made)
This film isn't 5 stars, it's 10 stars!!

I remember the first time I watched this with my mum and the whole way through, we laughed our heads off!

Robin is again absolutely hilarious and brings a brilliant performance to the film. He has to be the reason the film went to box-office success because I can't imagine another actor playing the role of...
Published on 29 Jun 2011 by R. Hill

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still a good one.
I have never seen this movie before and I bought it recently. A funny film with some good humor and a lot of good music. It is obvious that a lot has happened during the last 21 years of making movies but this one it still good entertainment. Watch Robin Williams as a upcoming star.
Published on 25 Dec 2009 by The Golfer


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant (Has to be one of the greatest films ever made), 29 Jun 2011
By 
R. Hill "R." (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This film isn't 5 stars, it's 10 stars!!

I remember the first time I watched this with my mum and the whole way through, we laughed our heads off!

Robin is again absolutely hilarious and brings a brilliant performance to the film. He has to be the reason the film went to box-office success because I can't imagine another actor playing the role of Cronauer as well as Robin did!

Not only is this one of my favourite films, it's one of the films I mention when I get asked what's your favourite films?

So seriously buy this DVD now - it's worth it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant treatment of a most difficult subject, 8 Feb 2014
This film is a wonderful example of how to deal with a factual and depressing subject and make it totally watchable. Sure, the violence is covered, quite rightly, but it is cleverly interspersed with Robin Williams' quite brilliant repartie as the maverick DJ brought in to lift the troops' flagging morale. His character change once the violence touches him personally is wonderful to behold. The film never forgets the importance and seriousness of its topic, but there are moments of light relief. Personally I feel this is where it scores over the unending depression of films like Apocalypse Now and The Deer Hunter. In short a wonderful film, beautifully acted and brilliantly paced.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still a good one., 25 Dec 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have never seen this movie before and I bought it recently. A funny film with some good humor and a lot of good music. It is obvious that a lot has happened during the last 21 years of making movies but this one it still good entertainment. Watch Robin Williams as a upcoming star.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Showcase for William's unique improvisation skills, 21 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the story of armed forces radio DJ Adrian Cronauer (played by Williams) who is sent to Saigon in 1965 during the Vietnam war to re-vitalize a forces radio service that's broadcast style is desperately stuck in the past. It is loosely based on a real story of the impact Cronauer has on the radio station, its management and the troops.

The film takes its name from Cronauer's euphoric, over -the-top welcome call to his radio slot and is really a vehicle for William's unique ability to improvise with surreal monologues and dialogues delivered at breakneck speed by his character on air. There are some poignant moments (eg the bombing of a bar used by forces personnel or several of Cronauer's interactions with a native Vietnamese brother and sister) but these are relatively isolated and only hint at a pathos William's would go on to convey more convincingly in his later film roles. This aside, the acting, script and story are lightweight.

William's plays himself largely so any fan of his will love this film. The film could be retitled "Mork goes to Vietnam "(Mork from the TV series Mork and Mindy featuring Williams first major role). Some of his improvisations work and some don't but they are always engaging. Unfortunately, after (what becomes a catchphrase) "Good Mornng Vietnam", the most memorable line is also delivered by Williams in the first seconds of Cronauer's debut broadcast:

"It's 06.00 hours...what does the "o" stand for?......Oh my God it's early!"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Robin Williams best movie...PERIOD, 16 Aug 2014
I saw this film when it was first released at the cinema, what a film, powerful, enigmatic, well acted, great support acting, Robin Williams best film of his career, I left the cinema on a high and trying to emulate the catch phrase of Adrian kronaur , funny, sad, moody, tragic. I challenge any one not to love this film, If you watch this and not like it, then all i can say is "have a word with your self".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars In my opinion this is the late Robin William's best film and of course he made lots of films, 14 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In my opinion this is the late Robin William's best film and of course he made lots of films.
A fine talented man but a tragic figure of deep depression.
We have been left a great Legacy.
This is American DJ Adrian Cronauer who gets posted to cheer up the American Troops via his Radio Show in Saigon in 1965. He is very irreverent in his approach as he does the banter and plays a lot of unheard songs from the 60's, ,mainly US hits.
Its a dark comedy as there are bombings and heart ache. the top brass are not impressed and try to get him ousted. They succeed but the GIs want him back and he returns but eventually moves on at the end of the film. I love his manic sense of humour. he talks about the visit of Presdident Nixon and called him the Big Dick ( which was a fitting title in the end) and refers to Lesbians as 'women in sensible shoes' !! Its a great film and that is why I gave it 5*. I recommend and also the soundtrack too.
Bit of a sad ending but a great film x
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A fairy-tale of Saigon, 7 Nov 2014
It's the super-charged performance of RW that holds the film together but also the other very well-done 'types' in the army. The general (Noble Willingham) is superbly 'pragmatic'; J.T.Walsh convincingly bitter; Bruno Kirby hilariously funny at being unfunny; Richard Edson brings his "indie-film" weirdness to the mainstream. But Williams displays his (now sadly so exposed as very much 'his') mania rather brilliantly. The problem is that the 'story' is thin and the tiresome 'love-interest' bit mistakenly prominent. The politics are simplistic. Nevertheless, the 'showcased' passages in the studio and the confrontations between Kronauer and the army "squares" are the 'point'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Ever, 6 Dec 2009
By 
Vivien Watson (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Excellent movie. Deals with wider issues of the Vietnam conflict. Great actors portraying believable characters. Enjoyed it the first time around and bought it to share with my older children.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wakeup Call, Williams Style., 13 Jun 2004
By 
Themis-Athena (from somewhere between California and Germany) - See all my reviews
1965 was the year when, as a result of the Congressional Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, American military buildup in Vietnam began in earnest, and troop strength grew by a factor of no less than eight; from 23,000 at the beginning of the year to roughly 184,000 at the end. 1965 was also the year when a new AFN DJ arrived in Saigon, which over the course of that same year would transform itself from a sleepy French-Vietnamese colonial town into the nightmare it has since come to be in the memory of countless vets.
The new DJ in question was Adrian Cronauer; fresh from an assignment in Greece.
While the idea for a fictionalized account of his Vietnam experience was Cronauer's own, fueled by the popularity of "M*A*S*H," the script for Barry Levinson's "Good Morning Vietnam" was ultimately penned by screenwriter Mitch Markowitz with only some input from Cronauer himself, who has since gone out of his way to underline the fictional nature of the account and stress that his true stance was not so much anti-military as "anti-stupidity." Thus, the film has to be taken with a considerable grain of salt; both as far as the portrayal of 1960s' armed forces radio and as far as the movie's plot is concerned. But that doesn't make it any less poignant; nor does it take away one iota of Robin Williams's performance as Cronauer: Indeed, the role of an irreverent, unstoppable DJ seemed tailor-made for Williams, who had burst onto the scene with his inimitable brand of lightning-quick ad-libbing ten years earlier in "Mork & Mindy" - and of course, all of Cronauer's hilarious broadcasts in this movie are ad-libbed, too.
The film follows Adrian Cronauer from his arrival in Saigon in the spring of 1965 to his forced departure about a half year later (although the real Cronauer in fact stayed for a year and was not forced out but left when his regular tour of duty was over). While a comedy, and although not trying to be anywhere near the "definitive" take on Vietnam, it does take a close look at the year when the conflict escalated and, in particular, at the resulting toll on human relations. Robin Williams earned his first of to date four well-deserved Academy Award nominations for this role (the others were for "Dead Poets Society" [1989], "The Fisher King" [1991] and "Good Will Hunting" [1997], the movie for which he finally scored on Oscar night). And in his inimitable way he provides pointed comic relief not only over the microphone but also, and always with a unique ear for the situation's mood, whenever the script would otherwise threaten to veer off into melodrama; such as after his discovery that his Vietnamese friend Tuan is actually a Viet Cong fighter named Phan Duc To ("It's unbelievable. Five months in Saigon, and my best friend turns out to be a V.C. This will not look good on a resume!!"); and in scenes that would otherwise be burdened with a bit too much cliche and/or deliberately funny writing, such as the conference after Cronauer's first broadcast, where Bruno Kirby (Lieutenant Hauk) gets to deliver such gems as "Don't say that the weather is the same all the time here, because it's not; in fact, it's two degrees cooler today than yesterday" and "I hate the fact that you people never salute me - I'm a lieutenant, and I would like salutes occasionally. That's what being a higher rank is all about." Even if Kirby himself gets to make up for these a little later in the same scene with the comment "We are not going to escalate [Vietnam into] a whole war so we can get a big name comedian" (Bob Hope who, as the men have informed him, does not "play police actions"), it takes Williams's/Cronauer's final weaving of the lieutenant's preferred abbreviations into a single sentence to truly put the finishing touch on the scene.
Although "Good Morning Vietnam" is clearly first and foremost a star vehicle for Robin Williams, he is joined by an outstanding supporting cast, including inter alia, besides Bruno Kirby, Forest Whitaker as Cronauer's good-natured sidekick PFC Montesque Garlick, the ever-reliable J.T. Walsh as his second great nemesis, Sergeant Major Dickerson (whose stock character of a straight-laced white middle class guy would probably not have come off convincingly as a villain vis-a-vis anybody *but* Robin Williams) and, in particular, Tung Thanh Tran as Tuan and Chintara Sukapatana as his sister Trinh: Her plea with Cronauer not (even) to seek her friendship, let alone more, because for her such an association with a man (particularly a foreigner) is culturally unacceptable, is one of the movie's most quietly powerful scenes. Exceptional is further Peter Sova's cinematography, which convincingly captures the daily realities of a city and a country on the brink of an all-out war, and is brilliantly complimented by the editing, which in turn also uses the soundtrack - more or less a mid-1960s "greatest hits" compilation - to maximum effect; be it in framing daily military routine, the soldiers' enjoyment of Cronauer's style of broadcasting or combat action: Indeed, hardly any image could make a more powerful statement on the cruel absurdity of war than seeing a village blown up to the tune of Louis Armstrong's "It's a Wonderful World."
Thus, "Good Morning Vietnam" is in its own way as poignant a wakeup call as any other movie about Vietnam - or about World War II, or any other war for that matter. It deservedly netted the Political Film Society's 1989 Peace Award, in addition to Robin Williams's Oscar nomination and his Golden Globe and American Comedy awards, as well as the movie's ASCAP soundtrack award. And it certainly bears revisiting - for its overall quality, for Robin Williams's performance, and also for lessons learned and deserving never to be forgotten.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Top film for your library, 5 Sep 2014
By 
Dr. Michael J. Atkins (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I first saw Robin in this film and was immediately hooked by his comic genius. I have been told most was unscripted. This is one of his best films, with humour, pathos and showing his bi-polar sides. It also reminds me of Vietnam. There are touches on a darker side to bullying in the army and the futility of a war with such caring people. Loses a star for a weak ending but ignore that - this is a must see.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Good Morning Vietnam [VHS] [1988]
Good Morning Vietnam [VHS] [1988] by Barry Levinson (VHS Tape - 1988)
Used & New from: £1.00
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews