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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars long overdue for a re appraisal
This is a great recording, and only now beginning to be recognised as an 'almost' classic of the late 60's.

Let's face it, this is pretty heavy for '68 and its success in the U.S at the time bears this out. UK audiences wer'nt really ready for it. Richie obviously sees the way ahead in terms of the Hendrix style of guitar (remember Hendrix only came to the fore...
Published on 14 April 2003 by Sciflyer 1969

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shades of Deep Purple, Deep Purple (2000 EMI remaster) -Only shades of greatness!
A bit of a curio this. I bought it as I really like the Purple's later heavy rock sound, and am trying to get hold of all their back catalogue. I really wasn't expecting what I found here, an artier, late `60s trippy hippy sound.

There are shades of the group they would become, with the great instrumental workout `Mandrake Root', and a cover of Joe South's...
Published on 31 Mar 2010 by Victor


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shades of Deep Purple, Deep Purple (2000 EMI remaster) -Only shades of greatness!, 31 Mar 2010
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Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
A bit of a curio this. I bought it as I really like the Purple's later heavy rock sound, and am trying to get hold of all their back catalogue. I really wasn't expecting what I found here, an artier, late `60s trippy hippy sound.

There are shades of the group they would become, with the great instrumental workout `Mandrake Root', and a cover of Joe South's `Hush', which has to be the definitive version, and one of my all time favourite tracks. Jon Lord is already contributing some great organ rock sounds and Ritchie Blackmore is starting to show what a great guitarist he is, but a lot of it sounds a little over indulgent (Hey Joe and Help for example).

This release features several instrumentals, alternative takes and live versions of tracks on the album, which don't really add to the experience. The remastering is excellent, Hush has never sounded better on my stereo.

One for the completists. For those looking to taste Purple for the first time, start with later stuff like `In Rock' or `Fireball'.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "lose yourself in the purple sea of sound....", 1 Feb 2008
This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
...or so the blurb on the back of this album requests us to do. And you know what, on this - Deep Purple's first album - there are plenty of moments when you'll find yourself doing just that.

Opening track "And the Address" is, surprisingly for a debut album, an instrumental with a grooving riff reminiscent of Steppenwolf's "Sookie Sookie". Lots of raw guitar and Jon Lord's swinging hammond.

Next track, "Hush" is by far the most well know, and was a massive hit for the band in the US, at a time when they probably couldn't get arrested in Britain. If you're familiar with Kula Shaker's version then you'll find that the young Brit Pop pups strayed very little from the original. (If it ain't broke etc). Great stuff.

Then comes easily the weakest song on the album, and the sort of stuff that easily puts off so many Mk II fans from buying the Rod Evans era material. "One More Rainy Day" is slushy psych pop at its worst. I'm sure that Richie still wakes up in a cold sweat every now and again with the thought of having playing on that one.

But fear not, as the quality shoots back up again with Jon Lord's extended instrumental prelude "Happiness". Actually it's interesting just how much of this album is instrumental, which actually works to its advantage. Not that Rod's a poor vocalist by any means, but it's during the instrumental passages that you can really hear the development of the sound that would later straddle the world of RAWK.

And track 5 "Mandrake Root" is the best example of this. Rod does an excellent job on this number, but half way through Jon and Richie take over for a bit of a wig-out, and it's worth the cost of the CD just to own this one track.

"Help" is a rework of the Beatles song, played at half the speed. Which they actually manage to pull off.

"Love Help Me" is another excellent self penned track with a great distorted guitar riff - best heard on the bonus instrumental track (sorry again Rod!!).

And then things finish off with the song made famous by Jimi Hendrix - "Hey Joe". An odd choice of song I would have thought, given the supreme version Jimi did, but on DP's version we're treated to a Jon Lord introduction that dips heavily into his love of classical music. Something which really helps lift the song above just a bog standard cover.

And then, as with most bonus tracks, they don't really add anything that's above and beyond what was released on the original album. And this is no exception. But then, th strengths of songs like And The Address, Hush and Mandrake Root more than eliminate the need for extra gimmicks.

Anyone who is curious about this album, off the back of Hush, won't be disappointed. Anyone expecting to find a long forgotten "In Rock" will need to look else where.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars long overdue for a re appraisal, 14 April 2003
By 
Sciflyer 1969 (Kirkcaldy, Fife United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
This is a great recording, and only now beginning to be recognised as an 'almost' classic of the late 60's.

Let's face it, this is pretty heavy for '68 and its success in the U.S at the time bears this out. UK audiences wer'nt really ready for it. Richie obviously sees the way ahead in terms of the Hendrix style of guitar (remember Hendrix only came to the fore 18 months previous) and even for that alone it helped spearhead the idea of rock and progressive music.

The difficulty mark 1 Purple has always had is that so often their work has been reviewed by die hard heavy rockers that got into them thru that channel. I ask you to listen to it without genre limitations and what you'll find is a great piece of British late 60's art rock, that nods to the greats of the time, has great all round musicianship, and you still have to admire it's grooviness 30 plus years on.

The remastering is also of fantastic quality, while the mini booklet gives a great insight into the early exploits of the band.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Audio quality hugely improved over earlier version, 29 April 2010
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This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
I don't intend to review the music; this is a classic album and will be familiar to most people interested in it. However I do want to comment on the audio quality. The booklet notes explain why earlier releases of this music were of indifferent quality - something to do with master tapes being "lost" and the material being mastered from a record pressing. Suffice to say, this re-release, made from the now rediscovered original master tapes, is a massive improvement, on a par with, or better than, other contemporary titles. Excellent and certainly worth replacing an older copy.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The opening chapter..., 27 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
Picture the scene, summer of 68, kaftans, beads the lot. And here we have the first sample of Deep Purple music. Like most bands, the sound they started with was nothing like what they became. This was the band that did "Smoke On The Water" remember. Well if you are looking for hard rock, don't look here. Keyboard driven sub rock pop is a better description. Mind you, it turned out to be influential, copying Vanilla Fudge in such a way that Vanilla Fudge copied to sound for themselves. Confused? So were Purple, as this album lanched them around the world with the exception of the UK, as it contained their first hit single "Hush" (almost identical to the Kula Shaker version 25 years later). The music is experimental in places, with only "Mandrake Root" giving any sort of hint what would come 2 years later with "in Rock", but a very listenable piece of recording.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Faded purple, 5 April 2008
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D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
Deep Purple's debut album lies on the border between psychedelia and the band's future in hard rock. 'And The Address' is a pounding instrumental which looks more to the future and allows Ritchie Blackmore to flex his prowess on guitar, though his solos sometimes spiral into the clouds rather than fit in with what his bandmates are playing. 'Hush' is one of four covers and easily the most worthwhile, being not just a hit but a song they made their own. Of the other covers, Skip James's 'I'm So Glad' had already been done well by Cream and DP's version follows in their slipstream. They try to take 'Help' into a different area, but only succeed in bending it out of shape with a slow, ponderous treatment. And did the world need yet another version of 'Hey Joe'? Most bands short of original material covered this, while others rewrote it in their own image. 'One More Rainy Day' is a remnant of psych pop featuring some neat baroque organ work from Jon Lord, a good example of the genre, but a little out of place here. 'Prelude: Happiness' is oddly titled, sounding menacing rather than happy, though it points toward the band's later music. 'Mandrake Root' has a similar groove to 'And The Address' and is the albums most experimental song, featuring a few twists and turns. 'Love Help Me' is lighter and relatively weak. 'Shades Of Deep Purple' is, then, dated and an ill-fitting collection of styles, but contains some of the dynamism DP displayed so much of later.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The first, 19 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
album by the budding heavy rockers is full of experimental stuff, so it's worth the entry fee just for that. A really good first album which shows their potential well. And they have a pleasantly-voiced singer (not a good thing for heavy rock/metal because he strains on the really high notes required). Still, he's very good here.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Purple!!, 5 Feb 2012
This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
Deep Purples first album,an often overlooked gem. Worth buying for Nick Simpers Bass playing alone, And The Address is a classic instramental track and a great opener to the album. Don't compare this to other Purple line ups, think of a new band with a new sound, the late sixties never sounded better!.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 1970s hard rock band caught in earlier pop-psych incarnation, 12 Jan 2006
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This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
Another reviewer describes this LP as "art-rock" - I don't think I'd call it that (it's not exactly Soft Machine) but it does look to me like a time capsule of late-period Swinging London. Check out the photos of the band looking uncomfortable in their foppish Mr Fish threads and lacquered hairdos! Puzzle over the daft sleevenotes! Marvel at the authentically retro production! HOW much reverb??
Actually this first Purple outing does have its moments, with some groovy Hammond-heavy gogo tunes which still move the mod crowds today in the discotheques around town ("And The Address", "Hush", "Love Help Me"). I'd ignore the classical pretensions, though, which were never one of Purple's better decisions, and as for the heavy-handed covers - well - there's the worst version of the Beatles "Help" here that I've yet found.
So, a curio indeed, but one that's worth checking out, providing you're not expecting another "Speed King".
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the beginning of a great band, 14 Feb 2012
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This review is from: Shades Of Deep Purple (Audio CD)
I grew up in the 90's so it might shock people to learn I like deep purple but I A grew up with this kind of music mostly anyway and B rediscovered them when I was watching an Opeth dvd and also inherited my mums vinyls which contain two deep purple albums in rock and stormbringer, I there fore took the plunge and purchased all the deep purple studio albums to listen to how they changed and adapted over the years.

Shades is nothing like the music Deep purple are known for at least in England, It is features Jon lord in much more larger quantities than in later albums he is almost the show piece of the band, the vocals are smoother more like Elvis presley but english and with out the Thank you very much accent. its also quite psychadelic and strange at times, the bass guitar playing really stuck out to me, apparently nick was too old fashioned in his playing but on hearing the albums I though the bass guitar playing was really good it has a great tone to it though not quite as Volumny as roger glover I still though it was pretty good.
Ian paice drums on this album too and I though he made excellent use of playing to the rather wierd music and didn't just bash the hell out of them. Blackmore's guitaring seems to be less in the foreground on this album that later albums.

This album as I found out later ffrom the booklet contains quite a number of covers, notably hush and help! both of which are pretty good.
I quite enjoyed the album as a whole and thought it was much more adventurous but I didn't hear any clues as to what there future would hold. it certainly is not hard rock. I am trying to emphasise the point it is nothing like the later albums.

all in all it is great album with plenty of experimenting and plenty og 60's 70's prog rock sounding organs.
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