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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ownership Essential
This is the very best LP of any band from the punk era, the best album The Clash made and an essential item in any music collection.

Even after nearly 30 years, it's intense, concise and punctuated, both musically and lyrically. It still burns with energy and indignation.

Play this and you'll yearn for bands to start writing lyrics that mean...
Published on 11 Sep 2006 by Mr. Peter Barrett

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great old tunes.
Great old tunes - bought this after watching documentary about Joe Strummer. Some excellent stuff on here.
Published 4 months ago by Mr. D. G. Medley


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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ownership Essential, 11 Sep 2006
By 
Mr. Peter Barrett (Gloucestershire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
This is the very best LP of any band from the punk era, the best album The Clash made and an essential item in any music collection.

Even after nearly 30 years, it's intense, concise and punctuated, both musically and lyrically. It still burns with energy and indignation.

Play this and you'll yearn for bands to start writing lyrics that mean something again because lads, if any of you are reading this, you can make a difference through your music, and here's the proof.

Unlike some iconic punk albums this CD has been nicely remastered, so you get the full impact without reaching for the vinyl. One of the best things you'll ever buy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Clash (UK): The Clash - London teenagers outline their career opportunities, 8 Sep 2011
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
There seem to be many parallels between today and the late seventies. A time of economic depression, a working class trodden down by the conscienceless political rulers and moneyed elite, ethnic tensions simmering, a generation of young people with no future prospects ready to lash out a wave of destruction in the form of riots in protest at the injustices of the world they find themselves in. And the development of a new musical form which encapsulates the passion, the anger and the political stance of the youth. OK, perhaps the similarities end there, as plastic Cowell pop seems to be the hallmark of this generation, but thirty years ago the social situation gave rise to just such a musical form, Punk. And the prime exponents were the Clash.

This debut record is, for me, a fascinating piece. I was born around the time it was released, so have no real memories of the era. This is a historic document of what it meant to be a teenager in the late seventies. With an in your face attitude, a social awareness and political agenda, all backed by angry, passionate full speed ahead music played (unusually for many Punk bands) by a group of talented musicians, it's an absolute classic. It is a record that grabs you and commands your full attention, screaming in your face about just what is wrong with the world. Subtle it isn't.

There are two versions of this album on sale, the UK and US version. This one, the UK version is 14 tracks and contains `Deny', `Cheat', `Protex Blue' and '48 Hours'. For some reason these were deemed unsuitable for the US market which had a 15 track release containing `Clash City Rockers', `Complete Control', `White Man In Hammersmith', `I Fought The Law' and `Jail Guitar Doors'. Both are equally essential, and I have both versions as I like all the tracks that are unique to each.

A classic debut, and one that heralded great things to come. Five stars.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In Complete Control, 11 July 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
The debut album from the Clash. The only album that equals the Sex Pistols Never Mind The Bollocks. It is safe to say that this is not just punk at it's best but rock n' roll at it's sharpest. Althoug missing such classics as 'I Fought The Law' and 'White Man In Hammersmith Palais' it's still a solid album. This is a group who knew what they were doing. It contains such classics like 'Career Opportunities', 'White Riot' and their brilliant opening track 'Janie Jones'. Janie Jones sets the scene for a full throttle experience of punk. Joe Strummers voice is perfectly suited for punk. His snarls and howls betray the disgust and anger he has towards the world around him. Mick Jones guitar playing is remarkable, especialy considering this is a punk album. The Clash are more than just another guitar band on this album. There are no ten minute long guitar solos, no straying off the point. The Clash keep it short and to the point. They even show their ability to play reggae with 'Police and Thieves'. Overall it's an excellent album. My favorite track though has to be the excellent 'What's My Name?', expressing the isolation felt by youth at the time and also the idea that if nobody know who you are you can do what you want. I still can't believe it was watered down for the American release. Whichever version you have, it is still one of the most memorable albums of all time. Just try to stop yourself from humming Career Opportunites while in work. Rock n' roll at ti's greatest.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm so bored with....................!, 24 Jun 2013
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
The title of this review has nothing to do with this CD/album per se so read on and take heed. I'll keep it short as many comments have already been made. This is an ESSENTIAL record and most of the lyrics are as pertinent now as they were in '77. Just goes to show that in over 30 years of posturing by numerous political pygmies (with a few exceptions) nothing has really changed and if anything have gotten worse! The sheer power of this CD is astonishing. Even if you hate 'punk' rock this CD is considered to be vital listening and personal political persuasions have nothing to do with it, they are all to blame and sadly this once great Country now appears to be damaged beyond repair. 'Are you alright Jack?'. The sad part in my opinion is that in their later years even the Clash appeared to sell out so the system has won again? I was luckily enough to have seen them live when they and a few others actually seemed to mean it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest piece of Vinyl ever...no contest, 30 Sep 2009
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
Quite simpy...the finest, most important, exciting,inspiring, life defining, influential and time defying rock n' roll record EVER!
there really is no contest to this perfect testament to what a RECORD should sound and be like. Never to be matched..truly the greatest!!!

Joe Strummer and the Legend of "The Clash"

I would double it's star rating if I could
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great album from the Greatest band, 14 Nov 2006
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
I think that this ablum proves what punk is. It isnt Green Day or Blink-182. This is real, hard, political punk. The Clash's self-titled debut album, lyrically brings up some important topics for the working class in the 1970's such as drugs, war, violence etc. My personal favourate tracks are White riot, the song inspired by black people rioting and Joe wanting other people to be more like them and make a stand. Other favourates are Janie Jones a great opening track with the drumbeat, Londons Burning, a song about drugs and boredom, Garageland, a song celebrating being in a band. After the 30 years this album has had it is still as relevent and as great to listen to as it was. This is definatly one of the better Clash albums, along with Give em enough Rope. So if your looking for raw political punk, I would definatly recomend this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music For a Generation, 19 July 2010
By 
P. Frizelle (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
The Clash smells of late seventies London and the political and economic situation in England at the time.If one were to name one classic punk group, there's many bound to refer to The Clash. London. Its initial members were all brought together from different early punk bands in the London scene, which was then just getting started. It all turned sour very quickly as the Clash became fashion victims (Designer Punks) and chased the American Dream. There was some redemption some years later with the fabulous London's Calling, but I could never see what al the fuss was about.

However their debut sees The Clash at their rawest, and is their most straightforward punk record. It's loud, it's rough, and it equips the typical and most important punk ethic: it goes back to the roots of rock `n roll. Simple three-chord riffing that makes up short songs with a simple message, often politically charged. The Clash, were known for parodying the life of the middle-class English worker. If I were a poor, and unemployed Youth in the 70's Britain, the Clash would have been my salvation, much like the Smiths were salvation to the misunderstood in the 80s and Oasis were the inspiration for bricklayers in the 90s. But it was all fake, these were part-time rebels who came from rich and privileged backgrounds. They were just pretending to be suffering from a totalitarian regime and oppression, But it worked.

They had a witty lyrical content and a charismatic combination of musicians that gave them a winning formula. After the Self Destruction, notoriety and infamy of the Sex Pistols the public were scrambling to hitch a ride on the new Phenomena " Punk". The record Company's happily sold us the CLASH.

The main musical appeal to The Clash lies in, most notably on this first record, the two main figures Strummer and Jones. The former has just about the perfect punk voice; gruff and raw, and on top of that, it's thickly London accented with a heavy dose of Britishness, masterfully shouting its way through the songs. The latter, coming up with those simple but undeniably catchy riffs and fast, short solos, as well as providing his far different, much cleaner, poppier voice on occasions, is a powerful creative force in his own way.

Raw and trebly, second to the Pistols Never Mind the Bollocks this is the only other punk album to buy.. Frontman Joe Strummer barks like a rabid bulldog, often incomprehensible, but you don't have to understand the words for the syllables to impact.
Those days seem so long a go now as I pen this review and the issue sang with such gusto still haven't gone away, perhaps that tells a story in itself.

The kids of 77 are now nearly 50 with mortgages and careers a nice 4 x 4 and a villa in Portugal. So much for Teenage Kicks - We grow up an like a caterpillar morph into something our teenage shadow would dispise.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Punk Anthem, 3 July 2007
By 
Robert P. Splaine "mrbobsltd" (pattaya) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
Back in the 70's some preferred the pistols, other the Clash, me l liked them both. Full of energy is what springs to mind, it seemed electric, the voice of Strummer, so gritty, and truthfull, he meant what he sang, and it comes over in the songs..."were a garage band, we come from garage land". At the time l had my own play list of what l played the most each year, when this came out, l must have been playing it everyday, 507 plays in 1 year seems good.

If you only own 1 punk album, this has to be it, you wont be ashamed of this in your record collection, l still have my original vinyl copy, with a ticket to see them in Manchester Oct 30th 1977.

It's on the desert island with me.

RIP Joe Strummer
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5.0 out of 5 stars What are you rebelling against kid? What have you got?, 18 Feb 2010
By 
Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles "FIST" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
Shock,horror, outrage poured from buckets in the late 70's. A huge cascade, a waterfall of hatred drowned young people. The 70's was so rotten the addled woodworm penetrated its fake plastc veneer. Mock po faced righteous outrage of the socially bewildered aghast at the cultural malaise.

When this album shuddered into life, paedophilia had not yet been born, drug use was bohemian, going abroad was a trip to Wales, university was for elites, jobs were for old people and schools were run by stick wielding psychopaths.

This album ripped through the musical world cutting through the flabby sinews, muscles and veins of the corpulent rock neck. It scythed through the wobbling rock chin severing the bloated conceit from the puddle living above it.

In the late 70's there were no jobs. Career opportunities to kick you up the dock? Join the army. The USA was extremely boring. The halcyon days of Sgt Bilko and the Twilight Zone existed on late night TV. Revenge stalked the day with numerous cops and robbers spin offs coupled with cowboys and indians engaged in genocide.

Garageland was a luxurious retreat, respite from the 3 incessant propaganda of the TV stations. Prog Rock was pushed out of the hot air balloon. Rock and Roll died way before Elvis. Stripped of pheromones it became bland predictable, lumpen and worst of all, boring.

This was the political album offering salvation, after the Pistols nihilism. It became cool to be poor. It deals with the confrontation with the state; White Riot, Police and Thieves, London's Burning, Hate and War. It was a time Baader Meinhof were engaged in struggle in Germany, the Red Brigade in Italy, France was voting Communist and the Unions in the UK could paralyse the nation. 1968 was seen as a failure due to a lack of committment. All the old forms of oppression were within a whisker of being swept into a torrent. The zeitgeist of the era.

It all collapsed during the Falklands. Patriotism emerged and Thatcher, the most unpopular Prime Minister ever, managed to salvage her non stop party. Harnessing greed to destruction, the rest was history. This album is a relic of the time when anything seemed possible. Defeat was not necessarily inevitable as it appears in retrospect.

The music speaks for itself, copied repeatedly. It veers from amphetamine rushes of White Riot to the dope fuelled groove of Police and Thieves. The Clash eventually moved to the USA and were deemed to have sold their souls to mammon. This album then became the symbol for a time of failure.

The 70's are back, mass youth unemployment, an arid stultifying American culture, an escapist form of black music in RNB and a labour government in trouble, paving the way for a Conservative reaction.

This time around the musical soundtrack is Cheryl Cole. Suddenly the Clash appear much more vital.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest album of all time..., 17 Oct 2004
By 
Mr. L. Southgate "Drug Fiend" (Cornwall, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Clash [UK Version] (Audio CD)
I never thought anything of punk rock, that was untill I heard this album. The Clash had so much more going on upstairs than the other punk bands. Joe Strummer and Mick Jones were writing songs about their political views, and that is the main reason that I love them. When I first heard 'I'm So Bored With The U.S.A', I was shocked at how much it mirrored my own views. And thus my love of this band began.
This album has absolutely no bad songs, its amazing from start to finish. The energy behind the songs is awesome. The high point of the album is the song 'White Riot', a song written about the band's experience of a riot at a carnival in Nottinghill, they participated in the riot but all the time were aware that it was predominantly black people taking part in it. And the song is basically how black people have been opressed for years and how they have the "balls" to do something about it, unlike white people, who go to school 'where they teach you how to be thick'. As Tom Morello of 'Rage Against the Machine' said in a trubute to Joe Strummer, take the lyrics 'Are you taking over, or are you taking orders? are you going backwards, or are you going forwards?' from White Riot and stick them on your fridge, ask yourself those questions each day.
Joe Strummer was a genius, an inspiration and will be sorely missed. R.I.P
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