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16
4.6 out of 5 stars
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 29 December 1999
I percieve Thunder to be the best rock band to never make on the American front. This is in my humble opinion the best album by Thunder with close competition from the excellent 'Backstreet Symphony'. With tracks like 'Giving The Game Away' how can you really go wrong? I would recommend this album to any body who appreciates good, infact great rock music. This album is the most consistently good album, that i have ever heard.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 21 March 2000
This album, their last studio release, celebrates 10 years of great music, from one of the premier rock bands this country has produced in recent years. There is something for everyone here from classic rock tracks like "Rolling the Dice" to quirky, upbeat songs such as the title track "Giving the Game Away" and the cover of "Play That Funky Music". Well worth checking out, either as a fan or a newcomer to the Sound of THUNDER!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 7 January 2000
The last studio album the band released, and WHAT an album. After listing to the album, it baffles me why the record company were not enthusiastic about releasing more than one single. Tracks such as Rolling The Dice and Numb typify the superb diversity of their music.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 10 April 2006
Ok, I'll admit it, I LOVED this album as soon as I heard it. Thunder have been one of the most under-rated Rock acts that this country has ever produced. Having seen them live countless times, I was blown away by this album.
There is everything on this album that people love about Thunder: Great Lyrics, Great Music, and the token Cover Version. And even a cheeky message from the band at the end of the cd. Love it!
But to the tracks themselves. Starting with the superbly crafted Just Another Suicide's scathing look at the celebrity obsessed culture through to the heartfelt ballad of It Could Be Tonight the album produces the goods on each and every track. Standout tracks though are Numb and 'Til It Shines which is possibly the best song ever written if only for the line "...You Want To Take A Hammer To Your Next Door Neighbours Car...". Priceless!
If you want an album to introduce you to a fantastic group, buy this one.....and then buy all the others!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 7 August 2004
Many will not be aware of Brit Rockers Thunder, a truly great rock band who consistently produced good Blues/Rock/Metal albums through the 80s and 90s. This appears to be a relatively overlooked album from 1999. It truly conatains some great songs, with a great rocking opener in Just Another Suicide. All the material included here is well written performed and produced, Til it Shines is a favourite with great lyrics. If you want an album you can truly enjoy listening to time and again, invest a tenner here and turn up the sub-woofer and hear the clap !!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This is by some distance Thunder's finest effort. Just Another Suicide, All I Ever Wanted and It's Another Day are impeccably written, still sound fresh and would do very well in today's market. The production is rocky without being cheesy.

It could be argued that after this they gave up on trying on the quality and being successful and are now releasing album after album of dated riffs and cheesy lyrics to please their fanbase, many of whom didn't like this album. What a shame
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on 11 January 2015
This album shows the great strides that Thunder made during the first ten years of their career. There is a much greater maturity in both the music and the lyrics here, as compared to previous albums. The backing vocals have greatly improved from 1995’s “Behind Closed Doors” and the sound is a lot smoother than on 1993’s “Laughing on Judgement Day”. However, maturity in music, as in life, comes with a price. With a couple of exceptions, a lot of the fun seems to have gone from Thunder’s music. There are still some great tracks, and there is still a little humour present, but this is a release that should have allowed Thunder to progress properly into the ranks of the top selling rock groups, and gained them a wider audience.

Sadly, this was not to be. This album, meant to celebrate their tenth anniversary as a band and to lead onto a brighter future was to prove their last studio release for some time, as they announced they were splitting. I don’t think that it was ever intended that way, but this party became a wake. I guess the feeling is a little like that scene in “Four Weddings and a Funeral”, where the bloke has a heart attack. What should have been a celebration is marred by a sad event. Fortunately, they are now together, and a new album will be out in March.

I have the “Tenth Anniversary Edition” of this album. I don’t know if there was a release that wasn’t celebrating this event or, if there was, how it differs from this one. The cover, unlike some of their previous ones, is simplicity itself. A shot over a river at dusk, blurred, out of focus. Kind of laid back, which sums this album up rather nicely. The CD booklet is also quite different to previous albums, and has the feeling of an ending and a fresh beginning. Gone are the song lyrics which have graced all the previous albums, missing are the lists of thanks and “who did what’s”. As I say, maybe there is a different version there, maybe the cassette is different, but this is all I have.

With this outlet for Thunder’s humour gone, what we have is a ten year retrospective of the band’s career, running from 02/01/89 when Terraplane split up and a couple of the guys decided to form Thunder, through to 15/03/99 when this album was originally released. There are a few words from rock journalists who championed the band, Neil Jeffries’ piece in particular raising a number of smiles, and providing some information I didn’t know, and pictures from promotional shots, of record covers and from magazines, gig tickets and posters. The best of these has to be the shots of some of the band in their younger days (I think it’s Ben in the cub scout uniform!), the band with Melinda Messenger, who looks a little nervous and the votes from a best new band poll, which put them ahead of the Black Crowes. Most confusing has to be the poster from a gig in Nagoya in 1992, which is largely in Japanese, and the record cover for a (I think it’s) Dutch release of “Het Stilzwegen Doorbroken”, which I have NO idea what song that is! If anyone can translate, I’d be grateful!

The humour appears most readily in the notes that accompany the retrospective, although you do need to go looking for them. Comments that almost seem to have been thrown in amongst the music news such as “03/06/89. Crystal Palace promoted to division one. Harry is pleased” and “23/07/97. Danny’s knee operation. Much hobbling and cursing arises” don’t really tell you anything about what’s on the CD, but are great for summing up the band. Information like finding out that only 35 people attended their first gig in Southend in July 1989 and that “The Thrill of it All” would have been released in late 1996 instead of 1997 if Ben hadn’t had tendonitis and been barred from playing his guitar are things you never knew before, but somehow add so much to the love of the band. There were hard times, but they kept going, and they kept getting stronger.

As entertaining as the booklet is, it’s the music that people loved Thunder for, and there’s plenty of that. There’s nothing as wild and raucous as “Dirty Love”, nothing as laugh out loud funny as “Stand Up”, but there’s also nothing as contrary to the usual Thunder sound as “Moth to the Flame”, or as poorly executed as “River of Pain”. What you find yourself with is a great example of how to write and play eleven rock songs.

Unlike some of Thunder’s previous releases, this isn’t really the kind of record you want to put on at a party and jump about to. It’s a lot more restrained than that, but is a great album to listen to, perhaps as background music, and I think it would be quite relaxing in the car.

However, the real beauty of this record is that you don’t have to be a Thunder fan to appreciate it. It’s a “calmer” album than many of their others, and would appeal to a much wider range of people. It’s not fully representative of their style, so is maybe not the best album to buy if you’re listening to Thunder for the first time.

For the Thunder fan, this is essential. It’s a very good album, and the comparison and the difference you’ll find between this and 1990’s debut “Backstreet Symphony” is one not to be missed. The two are quite different in style and content, and this is far more mature lyrically, but Danny’s voice hasn’t changed much in ten years, and that was always the most distinctive feature of the band’s sound.
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on 17 August 2011
This is a very under-rated album that was criticised for NOT being 'eavy enuff. Well, Exhibit A, listen to 'Time to get tough' to refute that !

Elsewhere, Danny Bowes' voice is as beautiful and soulful as ever, and even my 83-year-old mum likes 'All I ever wanted'.

A very good album.

Cover interpretation : The erosion of the UK manufacturing base
ie the decline of shipbuilding ('giving the game away') ?
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on 9 July 2014
I'd read other reviews - someone had written they had thought it better the 'Magnificent Seventh' (which I think is Thunder's top album) - so I bought 'Giving The Game Away' expecting to get some heavy rock anthems; Instead i got 'Play That Funky Music White Boy'. Oh boy, don't buy it, it's a dog!
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on 23 December 2009
Thanks for the limited edition cd. I am a Thunder fan and saw them during their last tour in Wolverhampton. This latest purchase has added to my collection of Thunder stuff.
Many thanks
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