Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well decorated, 9 Jan 2004
By 
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
For years, Pearl Jam have tried to recapture the magic they had from their first two albums. While still a great band, who's musical evolution means they've passed the test of time, Binaural and Riot Act can't even be placed alongside Ten and Versus. Not many musicians can produce consistently good music all of their lives. For every Beck, there are many Neil Young's. So with this album being released in 1997, not long after the release of No Code, the expectations can't have been too high for Stone Gossard's side project. Perhaps it was just good timing, but Brad's debut album (not counting the collection of demos known as Shame) was a masterpiece.
Despite all the hype surrounding the band revolving around Stone, it didn't take long to work out that the mastermind behind this project was Satchel's Shawn Smith. The Prince-influenced singer/pianist demands attention with his soft, mesmorising vocal lines. Brad bear more resemblance to Satchel than Pearl Jam but Stone Gossard's subtle guitar work does add a lot to the mix. Always playing second fiddle to Mike McCready in Pearl Jam gives Stone the perfect experience of adding the parts to songs which you hardly notice when they are there, but would definitely notice if they weren't.
The album was never meant to change the world, but the quality of songwriting here is enough to win over most. Ranging from the lullaby serenity of 'Some Never Come Home' to the dirty grunge of 'Sweet Al George', the album caters for a lot of tastes.
Highlights of the album include the Pachelbel 'Canon In D' reminiscent 'The Day Brings', the haunting 'I Don't Know', the gentle 'Circle & Line' and the gorgeous 'Some Never Come Home'. Songs that captivate you from the very first listen.
There is one flaw on this album that seems to have put a lot of people off the band from the first listen. The problem is 'Secret Girl', the opening track. It's a no-brainer rock song that plods along with few redeaming features, and makes for good usage of the 'next' button on any stereo system. First impressions count and I know a lot of people who have never been able to see past the very average opening track. Despite 'Secret Girl' though, this album is a classic piece of work with every other track almost apologising for the opening number.
It's nothing too original, but the strength of the individual songs make that unimportant.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 6 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
Most side project bands are quite cr** and are usually there to boost the ego of the guitarist who stands at the back the stage while the singer gets credited for taking his pants off, i.e Bernard Butler. However Stone Gossard can now say that he belongs to two excellent bands, Pearl Jam and Brad. Following the excellent debut release of Shame, Interiors hits you again with excellent pop and rock tunes Secret Girl and I don't Know are my two favourite tunes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Genre to Genre - buy it., 27 Sep 2001
By 
M. Williams "mdurban" (Cheshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
A fabulous album from start to finish. Shawn Smith, Stone Gossard and the boys do themselves proud. They take what they have learnt from Satchel, Pearl Jam etc and throw it in the bin, instead they bring us a mix of tunes from the piano ballads right up to the heavier rock themes. All are inspired and all have their own beauty. Smith's voice has improved and he now adds a touch of elegance to the tracks, who needs distortion when you can make a piano with a faint Gossard overlay sound sooo good.
I would have to advise anyone to buy this album, it isn't heavy it isn't soft, it is everything.
It is difficult to put in into a genre as such as there is such a range of compositions, even my mother would take a liking to some of the tracks on this wonderful album.
Oh and for those die hard Pearl Jammers, listen out for some great melodies from Mike McCready in the background of a couple of the tracks adding yet another level to the songs.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Well decorated, 9 Jan 2004
By 
For years, Pearl Jam have tried to recapture the magic they had from their first two albums. While still a great band, who's musical evolution means they've passed the test of time, Binaural and Riot Act can't even be placed alongside Ten and Versus. Not many musicians can produce consistently good music all of their lives. For every Beck, there are many Neil Young's. So with this album being released in 1997, not long after the release of No Code, the expectations can't have been too high for Stone Gossard's side project. Perhaps it was just good timing, but Brad's debut album (not counting the collection of demos known as Shame) was a masterpiece.
Despite all the hype surrounding the band revolving around Stone, it didn't take long to work out that the mastermind behind this project was Satchel's Shawn Smith. The Prince-influenced singer/pianist demands attention with his soft, mesmorising vocal lines. Brad bear more resemblance to Satchel than Pearl Jam but Stone Gossard's subtle guitar work does add a lot to the mix. Always playing second fiddle to Mike McCready in Pearl Jam gives Stone the perfect experience of adding the parts to songs which you hardly notice when they are there, but would definitely notice if they weren't.
The album was never meant to change the world, but the quality of songwriting here is enough to win over most. Ranging from the lullaby serenity of 'Some Never Come Home' to the dirty grunge of 'Sweet Al George', the album caters for a lot of tastes.
Highlights of the album include the Pachelbel 'Canon In D' reminiscent 'The Day Brings', the haunting 'I Don't Know', the gentle 'Circle & Line' and the gorgeous 'Some Never Come Home'. Songs that captivate you from the very first listen.
There is one flaw on this album that seems to have put a lot of people off the band from the first listen. The problem is 'Secret Girl', the opening track. It's a no-brainer rock song that plods along with few redeaming features, and makes for good usage of the 'next' button on any stereo system. First impressions count and I know a lot of people who have never been able to see past the very average opening track. Despite 'Secret Girl' though, this album is a classic piece of work with every other track almost apologising for the opening number.
It's nothing too original, but the strength of the individual songs make that unimportant.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars BLOODY AMAZING, 23 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
What can I say, from start to finish this is a quality album. With tracks ranging from 'some never come home' and 'sweet al george' every music fan would love this album. SWEET!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow! What a great record!, 5 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
This CD is totally not what i expected, it ranges from subtle ballads 'the day brings' and upbeat 'fiddly' songs like 'sweet al george'. Anybody would like this album, believe me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well decorated, 2 Oct 2003
By 
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
For years, Pearl Jam have tried to recapture the magic they had from their first two albums. While still a great band, who's musical evolution means they've passed the test of time, Binaural and Riot Act can't even be placed alongside Ten and Versus. Not many musicians can produce consistently good music all of their lives. For every Beck, there are many Neil Young's. So with this album being released in 1997, not long after the release of No Code, the expectations can't have been too high for Stone Gossard's side project. Perhaps it was just good timing, but Brad's debut album (not counting the collection of demos known as Shame) was a masterpiece.
Despite all the hype surrounding the band revolving around Stone, it didn't take long to work out that the mastermind behind this project was Satchel's Shawn Smith. The Prince-influenced singer/pianist demands attention with his soft, mesmorising vocal lines. Brad bear more resemblance to Satchel than Pearl Jam but Stone Gossard's subtle guitar work does add a lot to the mix. Always playing second fiddle to Mike McCready in Pearl Jam gives Stone the perfect experience of adding the parts to songs which you hardly notice when they are there, but would definitely notice if they weren't.
The album was never meant to change the world, but the quality of songwriting here is enough to win over most. Ranging from the lullaby serenity of 'Some Never Come Home' to the dirty grunge of 'Sweet Al George', the album caters for a lot of tastes.
Highlights of the album include the Pachelbel 'Canon In D' reminiscent 'The Day Brings', the haunting 'I Don't Know', the gentle 'Circle & Line' and the gorgeous 'Some Never Come Home'. Songs that captivate you from the very first listen.
There is one flaw on this album that seems to have put a lot of people off the band from the first listen. The problem is 'Secret Girl', the opening track. It's a no-brainer rock song that plods along with few redeaming features, and makes for good usage of the 'next' button on any stereo system. First impressions count and I know a lot of people who have never been able to see past the very average opening track. Despite 'Secret Girl' though, this album is a classic piece of work with every other track almost apologising for the opening number.
It's nothing too original, but the strength of the individual songs make that unimportant.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Interiors
Interiors by Brad (Audio CD - 1998)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews