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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Debut Album
Although this album did not storm through the charts and was critisized for not being accessible enough, I feel that it was a stepping stone in Queen going on to conquer the world. 'Keep Yourself Alive' is a great tune, unquestionably the best on the album with Brians strumming technique dictating the pace for the rest of the song. 'Doing Alright' is a slow paced...
Published on 24 Jun. 2002 by chris clarke

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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Birth of the greatest band ever?
In 1973, a few friends and acquaintances got together who had already been in a couple of bands, and had already kind of got their faces semi-known on the gig circuit. These bands were called 'Smile' and 'Larry Lurex.' Brian May and Roger Taylor were in Smile, and Frederick Bulsara, also known as Freddie Mercury, was in Larry Lurex. When these young up and coming...
Published on 19 May 2004 by M. Higgins


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Debut Album, 24 Jun. 2002
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Although this album did not storm through the charts and was critisized for not being accessible enough, I feel that it was a stepping stone in Queen going on to conquer the world. 'Keep Yourself Alive' is a great tune, unquestionably the best on the album with Brians strumming technique dictating the pace for the rest of the song. 'Doing Alright' is a slow paced biographical song with Brian May describing the life of a typical art student.(Die-Hard Queen fans should note that this is the only song on any official Queen album that is partly written by Tim Staffell, who was in Smile with Roger and Brian). 'Great King Rat' and 'My Fairy King' are songs created by the innovative and imaginative Mercury who writes about 'horses with eagles wings' and 'dragons that fly like sparrows thru the air' etc. 'Liar' is a song in which Freddie(or perhaps a fictional character) is begging for forgiveness and shows how Brian has the makings for a world-class guitar player. Brian then cultures a unique song in 'The Night Comes Down' which is slightly more progressive than the others because very little electric guitar work can be heard on it. Roger's contibution to the album is the 2-minute rocker 'Modern Times Rock'n'Roll' which leads into the heavy 'Son and Daughter' which is very much a twin to 'Sweet Lady' on 'A Night at the Opera'. Freddie shows his interest in religion in 'Jesus' and the album finishes with the original version of 'Seven Seas of Rhye' which is instrumental.
The only criticism of this album is that it only has one truely outstanding song and Freddies vocal range has clearly not developed to it's true potential. However I would highly recommend buying it and any Queen fan who does not own it should be ashamed of themselves!!!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars absolutely marvelous debut album., 6 Sept. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
this album was realeased in 1973 but some songs are from earlier on when they formed in 1971. every song bar jesus and the unfinished 7 seas of rhye are exellent,my personal favorite and the one i cant seem to get out of my head is "the night comes down" with its neck tingling guitars and freddie`s soaring vocals. this album is an absolute must for rock fans out there. if this album came inbeetween say sheer heart attack and night at the opera,no one would have batted an eyelid,but because its a debut it gets top marks.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm not a Queen fan but I love this one, 24 Feb. 2007
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Before Queen found their feet and decided to be a flambouyant, slightly glam and later a tongue-in-cheek rock band, Queen were churning out well-crafted no-nonsense heavy rock classics.

This album is a mixture of ballads (Doin' Alright) and classy heavy metal (Liar and Great King Rat).

The whole effect is far less pretentious than their later offerings, and a bit unsure of itself but great fun, nasty and loud.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lots of raw energy. It all began here., 24 May 2000
By 
John Peter O'connor - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
If you have never heard this debut album, you may well be surprised at how raw it sounds compared to other Queen work. Certainly, there is much more band and less producer here. For a debut album, it is very accomplished indeed. No weak songs and no filler.
"Keep Yourself Alive" and "Liar" are my personal favourites but I'll happily listen to every song on this CD over and over again.
The CD shows up some limitations of the original recording in terms of levels of noise but this is not uncommon in recordings from so long ago.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What do you mean, you've got all their singles?, 25 Oct. 2008
By 
F. Lacey "swanofsevern" (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Doesn't matter how many 'best ofs' you buy, you still need to hear Queen and Queen II to understand what they were like when some of us were lucky enough to see them perform in university music venues before they became a supergroup. I loved this album then and I love it now. You don't need a video of their amazing stage performances to enjoy it just as music. Why haven't you bought it yet??
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Queen, 1 Mar. 2011
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Queen's debut album released on 13th July 1973, exactly twelve years to the day before their triumphant performance at Live Aid. Other titles considered for this album were 'Top Fax, Pix and Info' suggested by Roger Taylor, and 'Deary Me', a favourite phrase of one of the album's producers Roy Thomas Baker.

This album is a hard rock masterpiece which surprisingly did not set the charts alight peaking at number 24 in the UK album charts and 83 in US; however it did stay in the UK charts for 18 weeks and achieved gold status. The opening song was also Queen's first single `Keep Yourself Alive' which opens with an impressive guitar phasing effect before Freddie launches into the opening verse. The old Smile classic `Doing All Right' follows and is credited to May and Staffell on the album. In later years Smile's lead singer Tim Staffell confessed that the song had earned him a considerable amount of royalties over the years. `Great King Rat' and `My Fairy King' are Freddie's first foray into a fantasy world of characters that would not look out of place in a JRR Tolkien novel.

Side 2 (for those who remember LPs) kicks off with what must be Queen's heaviest song to date - `Liar'. With a thrashing aggressive guitar solo and over the top power-drumming that would rival any heavy metal band, this is arguably the best song on the album. However the song was utterly destroyed when released in a poorly edited form in the US for the band's second single there, when it predictably failed to chart. `My Fairy King' is a lighter ballad with delicate lyrics and an early glimpse of the harmonies that would become one of Queen's trademarks. `Modern Times Rock n Roll' is a highly charged song that crashes along at a frenetic pace with Roger Taylor exercising his talent as lead vocalist and writer for the first time. This song also has backing vocals by the album's co-producer John Anthony. The penultimate track on the album is `Jesus'; a Freddie composition that tells of the sick and needy seeking the help of Jesus and portrays the singer as a bystander who catches a glimpse of the man. The last song on the album is `Seven Seas of Rhye', but not the full version; it lasts only one minute and ten seconds and is instrumental only. The song was still in its infancy at the time of release of `Queen' and this taster was all that was previewed until the song was included in full on Queen's second album `Queen II'.

The album sleeve for `Queen' was designed by Freddie, Brian and Douglas Puddifoot, who was also responsible for the photography. Many of the photographs on the back of the album sleeve were taken in Freddie's flat at 100 Holland Park Road. John Deacon is named on the sleeve as 'Deacon John', and among the cover notes is the line 'Representing at last something of what Queen music has been over the last three years'. The cover notes also mention that 'Nobody played synthesizer' a proviso that remained with Queen until 1980's `The Game'

For a debut album this is a superb venture. The band was obviously still in its infancy in 1973, but already their trademark over the top grandiose compositions that would be a bastion throughout their career could be glimpsed in this first release.

On the date of this album's release Queen played a concert at Queen Mary College in Basingstoke, Hampshire.

Favourite line from Queen: 'Everybody in this bum-sucking world is gonna know who you are' ~ Modern Times Rock n Roll
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Queen I and Queen II, the best Queen albums, 25 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
I bought Queen I when it first came out and I was into science fantasy books like Michael Moorcock's Runestaff trilogy and Robert E. Howard's original and best Conan series. The tracks on this album just fitted those worlds beautifully. 'Keep Yourself Alive' has already been lauded, quite rightly, but my favourites are 'Liar' and 'Doing Alright'. Watch Queen performing 'Liar' on YouTube - it's classic stuff. Brian May isn't only learning his craft in these tracks, he's already there, in fact the whole band are and the opening of 'Liar' is a great stage for their talents.
The only downside of Queen I and II is the inclusion of tracks that don't fit the concept. These albums are dark and fantastic, Queen I's weak track is 'Modern Times Rock and Roll', for Queen II it's 'The Loser in the End'. Aside from those I would pick these albums way above the body of work coming in the later years. If you pine for or wish you were around in the 70s, the era of Dungeons and Dragons and science fantasy, then these albums will set the mood - castles, ogres, Queens, Faeries, hard driving rock with edge. You can't beat it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated and one of the best, 10 Mar. 2009
By 
MR (Amersham, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Several reasons to buy this.
1. There's no representation of this great album on Greatest Hits I, which is only due to the fact that it didn't contain a hit single. This was only due to lack of exposure.
2. It's a rare complement to the rest of the Queen catalogue as they sound like a mixture of themselves, but with Led Zep, Hendrix and maybe a bit of Deep Purple thrown in.

Basically, this album is an overlooked gem. The first 5 tracks are as solid a start as any Queen album. It's fair to say that the last 2 tracks are best forgotten ('Jesus' in particular. . . terrible lyrics especially).
After brief, but enjoyable tracks 'The Night Comes Down' and 'Modern Times Rock 'n' Roll', the listener is treated to 'Son and Daughter', which is a wonderful classic rocker with a riff worthy of Jimi Hendrix himself.

If this Queen album isn't worth 5 stars, I don't know what is. Not as overblown as Queen II, this is a must purchase and a great culmination of 3 years worth of material. Hell, why not buy them both.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning Debut, 16 Oct. 2012
By 
John F (Staffordshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Queen's first album must be one of the most stunning debuts in rock history. They fused the best elements of heavy, progressive and glam rock to create a totally unique sound. There's the phased swagger of 'Keep Yourself Alive', the swashbuckling 'Great King Rat' with it's blistering guitar workout and the plaintive, sumptuous 'My Fairy King'. But the tour de force has to be 'Liar' which pitches Freddie's tender, vulnerable vocals against a bone-crunching heavy metal backdrop.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The first album - and the heaviest?, 28 Jan. 2005
By 
ronster500 (Liverpool, England, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Queen (Audio CD)
Ah, early Queen, the halcyon days before they went out and bought that synthesiser...
Queen's debut is often overlooked by casual fans, and those unfamiliar with their early output will find this album almost unrecognisable from their 80s hits. For fans of hard rock however, this is probably the most satisfying album of the band's output.
Kicking off with 'Keep Yourself Alive', with Brian May's phased guitar riff reminiscent of Led Zeppelin (their influence is apparent on several numbers here), we are then taken down a little with the slowie 'Doing All Right' (written with former 'Smile' colleague Tim Stafell). The Freddie epics arrive with 'Great King Rat' and 'My Fairy King', the latter of which is a precursor to much of what is found on Mercury's 'Side Black' of the next album. Roger Taylor's high-pitched shriek is introduced here, and is a feature of their early material.
The real meat of the album comes with 'Liar' and 'Son and Daughter', which will satisfy even the hardest rockers, but this album features plenty of good chunky guitar throughout. 'Liar' even has a bit you can play air bass to, along with 'Deacon John' (as he was credited here)!
Drummer Roger Taylor gets to exercise his voice with the fast paced 'Modern Times Rock 'n' Roll', which leads into 'Son and Daughter'. The album closes with the gospel inspired 'Jesus' and the unfinished 'Seven Seas of Rhye'.
Quibbles? Too short, no real need for a partially completed track to close the album, and the production does sound a little 'muddy' - but we are talking about a debut album that has passed its 30th birthday. Speaking as a fan of heavy rock in general however, this album is one I remain drawn to when reaching for the Queen section of my record collection and so I award it the full five stars.
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