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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Criminally Overlooked, Classic, Eclectic Modern Jazz, 11 Aug. 2009
By 
T. Russell (Co. Down, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Expectations (Audio CD)
One of Jarrett's lesser-known albums but, IMO and by any standards, 2-discs' worth of unbridled freedom, joy and beauty.
At times spine-tinglingly romantic, free, rough or exploratory (sometimes even altogether) there is a lot of depth and breadth to this album - more so than in a lot of his later stuff, although this could easily be perceived as being the product of someone not yet sure where he is heading artistically and just throwing a bit of everything out there.
Perhaps not a must for fans of Jarrett's mammoth solo recordings or his ECM stuff, but essential for any lover of passionate, eclectic, unrestrained music and easily deserving of a high status in the vast discography of jazz.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best thing he ever did., 9 Sept. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Expectations (Audio CD)
This may seem a bit bizarre, but I am starting to think this is probably the best thing he did in the 1970s. It is the only record I still play on a regular basis. His ECM stuff now seems a bit prissy, pompous and pretentious.
I own a lot of Jarrett from the 1970s. He and Mclaughlin were my favourite artists. The first thing I bought was Gary Burton & Keith Jarrett in 1972 (aged 15), Expectations was purchased in 1973. At the time I thought the latter an extremely weird record. It features Dewey Redman & Charlie Haden (ex-Ornette Coleman), Paul Motian (ex-Paul Bley / Bill Evans), Sam Brown (guitar) and Airto. Expectations is joyous but anarchic. Over the years it has grown on me. It is a strange mixture of classical and free jazz. It has some great tunes and also some outstanding playing. Expectations is clever and inventive, and was made before Jarrett took himself too seriously.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Getting to the heart, 16 Dec. 2010
By 
N. Jones "Nic The Pen" (Oxford, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Expectations (Audio CD)
So much has been written about Keith Jarrett over the years that it's difficult to get at the straightforward matter of the man as a musician. Ian Carr's uncritically gushing tome on him has been no help at all in this matter, while the way in which the ECM label has gone about marketing his music only makes life more difficult for anyone interested in the substance. As if that wasn't enough Jarrett's often overbearingly precious attitude towards his art has had the effect of making him appear like an individual so far up himself that the avoidance of his work could be more like an attempted corrective than a conscious decision based on reasoned judgement.

This double album was however recorded at a time before such irritants were part of the baggage that the man carries. It's therefore easy to appreciate his pianistic originality on something like "The Magician in You" for all of the piece's gossamer lightness.

On "Common Mama" it's the work of undervalued tenor sax player Dewey Redman which catches the ear. His take on free playing, which found such a convivial home in Ornette Coleman's small group, here sounds like the work of a man with far deeper musical concerns than Jarrett. This is why he sounds so at home on "Roussillion" where the presence of bass player and stalwart of the early Coleman groups Charlie Haden has the effect of making Jarrett seem like a special guest at his own session.

By dint of more than sheer length "Nomads" forms the most significant music on the second disc. Jarrett at this stage in his career was a sly, perhaps innovative arranger and this is the piece that makes the point most forcefully. On organ he offers us real insight into what Miles Davis heard in his playing, while as a pianist his persuasive way with long, obviously deeply contemplative yet still spontaneously fresh sounding phrases gets as close as anything here to highlighting just what all the fuss was about, and perhaps still is.

To end on a trivial point, throughout this set Jarrett indulges in hardly any of those irritating wordless vocal asides which were to figure in his later work on record. Whether or not that was a sign that his primary concern was musical before he started to believe in his own myth remains open to discussion.
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Expectations
Expectations by Keith Jarrett (Audio CD - 2001)
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