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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eurythmics best album! Was downhill from here
This is a truly amazing album. The band was fresh, new and very experimental. The songs are very artsy, some with a hint of left over traces of punk. If you're looking for anything as awful and chart geared as "Would I lie to you" on this gem, then pass this up. There is no "hit" single on this album; just great and haunting songs from a band that sounded like they were...
Published on 23 Sep 2006 by Scott Davies

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars psychedlia
The first Eurythmics album (although actually the 5th time that former Longdancer and Tourist David A Stewart had made an album, whilst it was Annie Lennox's fourth, and the second time they'd been in the studio with legendary 'krautrock' producer Conny Plank...but this was the first time they'd be writing all the material and had creative...
Published on 20 Nov 2005 by feline1


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eurythmics best album! Was downhill from here, 23 Sep 2006
By 
Scott Davies - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a truly amazing album. The band was fresh, new and very experimental. The songs are very artsy, some with a hint of left over traces of punk. If you're looking for anything as awful and chart geared as "Would I lie to you" on this gem, then pass this up. There is no "hit" single on this album; just great and haunting songs from a band that sounded like they were making music they wanted to, and not for mass consumption. Two singles were released from this album - one barely charted in the UK and the other failed totally, at least on a commercial level.

This album was before Annie Lennox started with her never ending, soulful ranting and wailing, (see destroyed versions of some of these songs on their 1983 concert video release). Just listen to the opening track, the haunting "English summer", followed by the wonderful upbeat failed single "Belinda", to the moody and wonderful "Take me to your heart". Just amazing. A real highlight is the agressive "Caveman head", in which Annie sings with a very deadpan tone with all sorts or distant shouting in the background.

Thankfully, this new reissue has the excellent B side of the singles, which were only previously available on pricey used vinyl. "Le sinistre" is a definite horror movie, and "Heartbeat heartbeat" is a fast, punchy, short song that remains my favorite Eurythmics B side. The reissue also includes 3 of the 4 live B sides from the "This is the house" 12" single, all of which are very good, (though why they left one off is bewildering to me).

The remastering of the CD is pretty good, though in truth I think my original CD sounded a bit better. With this reissue, along with the 'Sweet Dreams' reissue, you can hear some occasional bits of stereo fluctuation, which could be caused by the aging tapes or so-so tape trasfer equipment during the remastering. The booklet is amazing, containing many rare session photos that just show how wonderfully bizarre Dave and Annie were at this time.

Unfortunately, nothing from this album has ever been represented at all on the bands 'Greatest hits' CD's. Granted, it wasn't a big success, but at least the inclusion of one of the singles would give a better overall representation of their career. Instead you get all of that "Sisters are doing it for themselves" garbage.

Eurythmics continued making some interesting music on their next two albums 'Sweet dreams' and 'Touch', but those awful funky vibes were starting to come through, and once they dumped the electronic percussion for the dreadful 1985 album 'Be yourself tonight', it was all over with the rare exception of the occasional decent song.

This unique and wonderful album would definitely be one of my Desert Island choices - I'll never tire of it. It's definitely in my top 5 all-time favorite albums.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Andrew Moynihan, 10 Oct 2003
By 
A. Moynihan (Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: In the Garden (Audio CD)
Why has this fantastic album slipped through the annals of music history, without the faintest recognition of a classic?? It is absolutely fantastic! I really dig the morose, yet beautiful vocals mixed up with those eerie and inventive guitare sounds to produce an overall mood and melody contained in 10 great tracks (particularly English Summer and Never Gonna Cry Again).
This album relies on the type of minimalism that exudes a non-pompous brilliance, making many albums of the early 80's great, such as Boy Don't Cry from the Cure or Garlands from Cocteau Twins.
If anything, I think that their follow-up album was quite a disappointment, apart from tracks "Sweet Dreams", "Love Is A Stranger" and "Jennifer".
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars psychedlia, 20 Nov 2005
By 
feline1 (Brighton, Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
The first Eurythmics album (although actually the 5th time that former Longdancer and Tourist David A Stewart had made an album, whilst it was Annie Lennox's fourth, and the second time they'd been in the studio with legendary 'krautrock' producer Conny Plank...but this was the first time they'd be writing all the material and had creative control) is a rather muted, dreamy, unfocussed, psychedelic affair.
That's not to say it's no good - but none of the songs really leap out and arrest you as hit pop tunes the way much of their later work would - instead the album tends to cocoon the listener in an uneasy dislocated mood, full of Plank's trademark reverberting sound textures (there's tape flanging on here to match 'Ruckzuck' from the first Kraftwerk album of 1971, and plenty of echoing wierdness from Can's Leibzeit & Czukay).
All in all, this is a rather cold clammy mildewed garden, inhabited by a man who'd spent a large part of the 1970s living in squats taking LSD every day, and a woman who would experience two nervous breakdowns in the next 18 months.
Anyhow, that's the music, how about this Sony-BMG remastered digipack? Well, the sound has a noticably improved clarity to my old 1980s RCA CD - the late Conny Plank would hopefully be delighted. The B-sides of the two singles from the original album make worthy additions ("HEARTBEAT HEARTBEAT" in particular is a gripping krautrock stomper), as are three live recordings from Eurythmics 1981 tour (performed by three persons and a tape machine) - originally these appeared as tracks on the 12" of their 1982 single, 'This is the House' - however, inexplicably, since the running time of the CD is only 57 minutes, the live version of "Your Time Will Come" from that 12" hasn't been included here - a shame, cos it was probably the best of the four!
Another minor gripe - although the digipack/booklet contains plenty of lovely previously unseen photos, the artwork from the two "Belinda" and "Never Gonna Cry Again" singles isn't included (the latter featured a striking photo of Lennox as a gargoyle, well worth seeing!), neither is the listing of musicians from the singles, and also the lyrics aren't included (they were on the original release).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seriously Overlooked Electro-Rock Album, 4 Sep 2002
By 
Ophiicus (Norwich) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: In the Garden (Audio CD)
This album had been bugging me for years after I withdrew it from the local library once, without making a decent copy, largely due to the immensely catchy "She's Invisible Now", so I got it recently. Wow, was I blown away by the sheer magnificence of this recording. As I understand it they remastered it in 1999 and that made a huge difference. I don't know if they got Dave in to supervise the remastering, but it certainly sounds more like his work of recent times than the original production, which was (so the stroy goes) done in a garage on a portable eight track studio. Consequently it was of very low production values, which must have near-killed Dave at the time, if what I hear of his perfectionism is correct. This mastering, whether Dave or a studio technician is truly magnificent, picking up on so much that was lost on the original (which was a rather worn 12-year-old-original-LP by the time I had listened to it) which gives it a depth and presence it simply lacked before.
Highlights are, as already mentioned, "She's Invisible Now" along with the very tuneful "Revenge" - shame they never used that title again, eh? - and the opening track which simply attacks you, grabs you by the throat, shouts "LISTEN" then calms down and nips off to make a cup of tea whilst you get your breath and enjoy the rest of the song. The title is "English Summer" and it is the most startling opener to an album I know, including "O Fortuna" from Carmina Burana.
Sylistically it is most similar to peace, but I suspect that has quite a lot to do with the time of the remaster. It would not need a lot of work to attempt to get a hit with this album in todays charts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dreamy, multitextured music, 5 Jun 2009
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This dreamy, avant-garde album of 1981 gave little indication of the Eurythmics' subsequent melodic pop direction that led them to mega stardom for most of the decade. It more closely resembles the work of 1970s experimentalists like Howard Devoto, Brian Eno and German artists like Can. Sometimes it even sounds like the later Cocteau Twins or the more ethereal varieties of world music. The poetic imagery and melodies are superb but it's as if Lennox & Stewart went out of their way to avoid popular appeal.

This direction is all the more odd in the light of Lennox and Stewart's previous band, the brilliant but underrated pop group The Tourists with their catchy tunes. In The Garden is a highly atmospheric work and contains at least two classics. The first is the rousing Belinda - to which Holger Czukay contributes French horn - with its cascading guitar textures, mournful drone and oriental backing vocals soaring to a scorching climax. She's Invisible Now is the second, an eerie, mournful song with a haunting spoken countdown.

English Summer is replete with chirping crickets, distant voices & traffic sounds, whilst Take Me To Your Heart & Your Time Will Come both have strong melodies. The problem is that the delivery is too subdued and understated to be immediately appealing. 'Heart' has a vague eastern feel owing to Czukay's "Thai stringed instrument." Anne's vocals on 'Your Time' are particularly arresting. The voice samples and found sounds on Caveman Head create a striking, other-worldly air.

The album's melancholia is particularly evident on the lament All The Young People Of Today, a slow song with muffled vocal samples and tortured guitar parts. The French track Sing-Sing's oneiric mood is interrupted by animal & metallic sounds. The mid-tempo Revenge, a lyrical gem, concluded the original album; it contains truly bizarre sound effects including normal and demented laughter. With its ticking clock and brooding sax, Le Sinistre amply lives up to its title.

In contrast, Heartbeat Heartbeat is urgent and uptempo, whilst the live version of Never Gonna Cry Again with its lilting beat is far more varied and appealing than the studio version. Of the other two live recordings, 4/4 In Leather is buoyant and percussive; Take Me To Your Heart which has a spoken introduction in French, concludes the album. People who like Magazine, The World of Skin, the Neo-Psychedelia of the 1990s like Rose Chronicles, the above-mentioned German avant-gardists, Brian Eno's My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, etc. will appreciate In The Garden.

Beautiful photographs of Lennox & Stewart enhance the fold-out digipack & the booklet that contains a brief bio by Phil Savidge that focuses on the band's history, style & influence as well as the track listing and information on the musicians, photographers & designers. The sound is crystal clear, revealing the depth and intricacy of the complex vocal & instrumental textures.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars WISTFUL & HAUNTING, 14 July 2000
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: In the Garden (Audio CD)
This dreamy, avant-garde album of 1981 gave little indication of the Eurythmics' subsequent melodic pop direction that led them to mega stardom for most of the decade. It more closely resembles the work of 1970s experimentalists like Howard Devoto, Brian Eno and German artists like Can. Sometimes it even sounds like the later Cocteau Twins or the more ethereal varieties of world music. The poetic imagery and melodies are superb but it's as if Lennox & Stewart went out of their way to avoid popular appeal.

This direction is all the more odd in the light of Lennox and Stewart's previous band, the brilliant but underrated pop group The Tourists with their catchy tunes. In The Garden is a highly atmospheric work and contains at least two classics. The first is the rousing Belinda - to which Holger Czukay contributes French horn - with its cascading guitar textures, mournful drone and oriental backing vocals soaring to a scorching climax. She's Invisible Now is the second, an eerie, mournful song with a haunting spoken countdown.

English Summer is replete with chirping crickets, distant voices & traffic sounds, whilst Take Me To Your Heart & Your Time Will Come both have strong melodies. The problem is that the delivery is too subdued and understated to be immediately appealing. 'Heart' has a vague eastern feel owing to Czukay's "Thai stringed instrument." Anne's vocals on 'Your Time' are particularly arresting. The voice samples and found sounds on Caveman Head create a striking, other-worldly air.

The album's melancholia is particularly evident on the lament All The Young People Of Today, a slow song with muffled vocal samples and tortured guitar parts. The French track Sing-Sing's oneiric mood is interrupted by animal & metallic sounds. The mid-tempo Revenge, a lyrical gem, concluded the original album; it contains truly bizarre sound effects including normal and demented laughter. With its ticking clock and brooding sax, Le Sinistre amply lives up to its title.

In contrast, Heartbeat Heartbeat is urgent and uptempo, whilst the live version of Never Gonna Cry Again with its lilting beat is far more varied and appealing than the studio version. Of the other two live recordings, 4/4 In Leather is buoyant and percussive; Take Me To Your Heart which is introduced by a spoken introduction in French, concludes the album. People who like Magazine, The World of Skin, the Neo-Psychedelia of the 1990s like Rose Chronicles, the above-mentioned German avant-gardists, Brian Eno's My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, etc. will appreciate In The Garden.

Beautiful photographs of Lennox & Stewart enhance the fold-out digipack & the booklet that contains a brief bio by Phil Savidge that focuses on the band's history, style & influence as well as the track listing and information on the musicians, photographers & designers. The sound is crystal clear, revealing the depth and intricacy of the complex vocal & instrumental textures.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely, Surreal, Strange..., 27 Aug 2012
By 
Tim Kidner "Hucklebrook Hound" (Salisbury, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This was one LP that I really played to its warped, scratched death. Long before Annie Lennox came a household name and before her collaboration with Dave Stewart produced three minute, perfect pop songs.

Starting out with a real Siousxie & the Banshees type of eerieness, with twangy guitars and loads of ambience, we have Annie's deep and soulful voice in the mood-setting English Summer. This neatly segues into the rock anthem Belinda, all powerhouse drums, bass and a wall of guitars, whilst Annie double-tracks with escalating vocal scales, giving it a majestic climax.

Take Me To Your Heart has some wonderfully recorded instrumental effects, both percussive and melodic, whilst Annie sultrily sings to us in her best come-to-bed voice. This new digitally remastered special edition sounds particularly superb on this track.

She's Invisible Now features an awesome amount of vocoder effect on Annie, but to good effect, whilst the backing, with imaginative and inventive synths add to the good, solid bass and drums. Dave Stewart's wailing lead guitar howls again at the start of Your Time Will Come, a rock number that stomps its way around one's living room. Annie has some of her trademark vocal loops that add to a dervish effect of spiralling, whilst Dave's bass plods on, solidly.

Caveman Head is back to Siouxsie Sioux territory but with an added barrage of instruments and effects, including distant, mysterious voices. Multilayered guitars and percussive effects create a scary, drug-induced sense of hysteria, whilst Annie's voice remains resolutely cool, with very simple, almost banal lyrics.

For me though, the album only really started with side 2 and the wonderful Never Gonna Cry Again. A rthymic rock beat laden with simple keyboards and lots of lovely little effects, that create a gem of a pop song, that builds to a lovely, natural crescendo. This then moves to the wonderfully poignant and at turns, powerful, All The Young (People of Today), with its lashings of effect laden guitars and simple keyboard notes, with a percussive backdrop that really builds up to a lovely strange and distorted end.

Sing-Sing, the penultimate song is a jaunty, dancey number that has Annie singing in French. The lyrics may seem a little trite but it flows along nicely and has some great chord changes, along with some vocal effects and that sort of in-your-head readiness that makes you want more. More importantly, though, Sing-Sing introduces the best track of the entire album:

Revenge - The best song the Eurythmics have ever made - a great crashing, percussive song with a mother of a rocking bass, with Annie's vocals soaring high above us, like a spiralling bird. Her voice is gently sampled, giving it an other-worldly angelic feel. The tempo then quickens, which along with a a change of chord and an angrier feel reminds one of that moment when one realises in a club that one is now finally drunk and now, at last, you are invincible. A superb, brilliant track.

For me, that is where the album ends, so complete was it as an LP. On this extended re-issue, we get extra tracks. They're B sides to singles from this album and a three live tracks. I switch off at this point....
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic, 29 Sep 2011
By 
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The Eurythmics before they found chart success and glory.

I'd forgotten how much I liked this album until I revisited it recently......."Revenge", "Belinda" and "Caveman Head" are wonderful tracks and I'm now happily back in the 80's.............
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5.0 out of 5 stars DIGIPACK, 1 Aug 2011
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HAD THE CASSETTE, THEN THE CD,NOW THIS DIGIPACK ,LOTS OF GOOD STUFF ON IT WELL WORTH THE MONEY....NICE TO HEAR LIVE STUFF
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4.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric and haunting, 27 Nov 2004
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: In the Garden (Audio CD)
This experimental, avant-garde album gave no indication of the Eurythmics' subsequent melodic pop direction and mega stardom. It fits in more with the work of late 70s experimentalists like Brian Eno, Holger Czukay and is not commercial at all. Sometimes it even sounds like the later Cocteau Twins or the more ethereal type of world music. This direction is all the more odd in the light of Lennox and Stewart's previous band, the brilliant but underrated pop group The Tourists. In The Garden is a very atmospheric work and does contain at least two classics: the intricate Belinda with its cascading guitar textures, mournful drone and oriental backing vocals building up to a scorching climax is quite impressive, as is She's Invisible Now, a sorrowful song with a haunting countdown effect. English Summer is replete with crickets & stuff, whilst Your Time Will Come also has a catchy melody. So, not recommended for Eurythmics fans. People who like Delerium, Rose Chronicles, the above-mentioned German artists, Brian Eno's "My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts," Deep Forest etc. will certainly enjoy it.
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In the Garden
In the Garden by Eurythmics (Audio CD - 1991)
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