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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars speaking as a child of the 90's.....
Apart from 'Ten' this is maybe their best record. (Ten isn't 'dated' - its an album of music.) No Code is like the healing process after all the rage and torment of Vitalogy (yet still has a lot in common with that record.) Like Vitalogy, it is innovative + diverse + uncompromising + above all (as ever with PJ) comes straight from the heart. Although No Code is...
Published on 30 Mar 2000

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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works best as a whole
It's amazing how much abuse people are willing to hurl at Pearl Jam's fourth album. I don't think it's that bad. In fact, I quite like it. It's not my favourite album or anything, but it's still pretty good. The mistake that most people make, I feel, is that they are - and this is true of every Pearl Jam release - expecting another Ten. And, granted, Ten was...
Published on 30 Nov 1999


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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Their Best, But Blimey, Its Still Awesome!, 27 April 2006
By 
Mr. R. Eggar - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
It makes me laugh how much pearl jam fans are very selective over their albums. true, they have plenty to choose from and im my personal opinion 'Ten' is their best, but then i know PJ fans who hate 'Ten'. This a;bum is great, each track having its distinctive sound. If you're looking for a PJ album with some difference then but this now. If you want classic PJ, then stick to 'Ten' or 'Riot Act.' I do, however suggest to fans of heavier PJ tracks to pick up their latest album 'Pearl Jam.' Not released yet bout early tracks sound beautifully angry!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pearl Jam r the best ever u cant deny it, 11 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
Since Pearl Jam crashed onto the music scene in 1991 they have broken many rules in the recording industry and have broken many records. They are undoubtedly the best rock band of the 90s. No Code being their fourth album shows how diverse they truly are. There are heavy beating songs uch as Lukn and Habit but there are also more mellow songs such as around the bend and sometimes. Pearl Jam have become a more open less comercial band with this album. It has shown that Pearl Jam are still a force to be recond with in this modern day world of mass produced pop, that a band of their quality can be found still around is heart warming and gives me some hope for the rest of the record industry as a whole.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect because it's not perfect, 28 Sep 2003
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
"No Code", Pearl Jam's 4th studio album, is perfect because it's not perfect. To explain, Pearl Jam had already begun to change musical tact on their last album ("Vitalogy"). They wanted out of the grunge sound that had made them, to develop to higher alternative rock plains. On this album, they are both still on their way in some places, and yet they've already made it in others, and overall this album has made it. Confused? Good! Because, that's what this album's meant to do. Its unpredictable and general weirdness makes it a bit unsettling, but give it a chance with many repeat plays, and you'll get that it's something that you're not supposed to get...and in the end that's why you'll end up loving it, and describing it as I have. Confused? Like I said, good!
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pearl Jam realises it's time to lose the rage on NO CODE. October 2, 2001, 15 Oct 2007
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
For those looking for another TEN, this is the wrong place to go. NO CODE is the key album to understanding Pearl Jam and is the turning point of their career, some say for better, others for worst. However, their progression is a journey, and this release is the one where Pearl Jam came to a fork in the road and chose a direction to follow.

Now, for those looking for another TEN, it's time to move on. You cannot expect an artist (a good one, that is) to go on milking the same formula. Where would we be had The Beatles kept singing songs like 'I Want to Hold Your Hand,' instead of traveling to the majesties of 'Hey Jude,' and 'Revolution,' (the White Album version)?

Following Pearl Jam, in some ways, is like following Bob Dylan's and The Beatles' career. These three aforementioned are true artists, and so their evolution makes a very exciting one to follow. You can't really get the full impact of BLONDE ON BLONDE without knowing the six records preceding it, or RUBBER SOUL without hearing the five albums and myriad singles before that. With this album, you can't really get the full impact without having at least a passing knowledge of the three records before this one.

Commercially, this is Pearl Jam's worst release, and there are no 'biggies' in the song selection such as 'Alive,' 'Even Flow,' 'Daughter,' or 'Better Man.' However, just because a particular album does not get a lot of radio play does not necessarily negate it to the recycle bin. Almost all the tracks are very strong compositions. Sometimes the band falls down, such as 'Present Tense,' which seems just a little to preach to me, and 'Habit,' which says the same lines over and over and over for three and a half minutes. Some may really like them, but for me they're just so-so. 'Mankind' I still don't really know what to do with, because, although I like it, the song is a rather odd selection for the tone of this album. Only one song will take you back to their earlier grunge days, and that is 'Lukin', which is just over a minute and sounds like Eddie's vocal cords are ripped to shreds when he finishes. I have a live version of the song and I can't understand anything he says in it.

Pearl Jam, with their release of TEN in 1991, became one of the major players in the early 1990s along with Nirvana, Soundgarden, and Alice in Chains. Of these bands, Pearl Jam has had the longest career, and amazingly did not self-destruct as Nirvana did. There is a reason for this, and this album becomes on of the keys in understanding Pearl Jam.
The first three albums are begin a descent into the hellish regions of rage and it's effects on the human psyche. VITALOGY, Pearl Jam's darkest album, almost plays as a concept album about paranoia, pain, and death. Eddie Vedder's emotions and struggle for understanding are laid out for all to see, and the all consuming rage will have to either be allievated or only more ill could come. The single most important moment on that particular album is 'Immortality,' where Vedder deals with Kurt Cobain's suicide. Had the rage been allowed to continue, Pearl Jam could not have continued for much longer. It's no conincidence that the first two albums sound like earlier extensions of VITALOGY. They begin a downward spiral and absolutely plummet in VITALOGY, and the reason for all the experiments that made VITALOGY so uneven was because Pearl Jam was already, in their rage and fighting their own personal demons, were trying to come up with a way to deal with it.

With NO CODE, their most varied and least accessible album on a commercial level, find Pearl Jam on the morning after. The first three albums represent the night before, drunken rage and struggle for understanding of this inherently insane world (or so it would seem) being night's only companion. From a musical standpoint this release takes the rather roughshod experiments of VITALOGY and builds an album out of them, resulting in the most sonically different album in this band's catalogue. Here, with all sorts of world vibes going down with mantra percussion and some of the softest songs of this band's career, instead of rage Vedder contemplates in a rational manner the problems facing him, and this record shows Pearl Jam finding solace in this course of action.

The experiments on VITALOGY borderline, at times, on the unlistenable with the likes of poorly executed sound collages (Foxeymophandlmama) or the inane ('Bugs'). Don't think it's because of a musical aversion to experimental music, because I really like 'Revolution 9'. Here, however, with the rage gone, the band focuses on this branching out more, and instead of half-realised thoughts on VITALOGY, we have full musical expressions. The chaotic and unrealised song fragments or experimental vibes help indicate Pearl Jam's searching, and while making an ascethic contribution, I always find myself skipping over them. The musical expansion on NO CODE, the maturing of a band, ties in with the band's personal growth as human beings. With the rage stripped away, instead we have a more subdued Pearl Jam dealing with problems in their lives with contemplation, which is one reason that it is the single most mellow album in their catalogue. It is sad the fan base couldn't see that.

In the end, this is Pearl Jam's turning point. From here on out, their releases (1998's YIELD and 2000's BINURAL) would reflect this and further expand this band's journey. It is a rather sad fact that, despite it being a very strong album, the fan base simply wouldn't rally behind this one. This album had to come out, or Pearl Jam would just continually be plagued with their demons and artistically they would begin to lose their momentum and eventually self-destruct. Without Pearl Jam making this choice to let go of their anger, I do not think they'd still be around today, and I think Cobain's death was a very sobering moment for them. With this decision to move on, we have Pearl Jam's most touching, heart-felt, and most fully realised album to date.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I love this album, i really do, 7 Jun 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
Ok, at one point i said no code is my favourite, out of all six, but Ive had problems with that lately... all the albums are soooo good! This is the album which made everyone sigh, but I didnt understand yet i ask "dont it make you smile?". I feel the album is great because of this one reason... its different. It is a very different album to all the others, now we see the more gentle eddie, and hear more mellow tunes, we even hear gossard singing (wow!) on mankind. Mankind is quite a good track but not as good as many of the others. I still wonder why people saw red mosquito as "a pearl jam joke" I love that song! Most breathtaking of all is the song present tense, I love everything about that song, great guitaring, dynamic bass solo, and inspirational lyrics. I loved this album from the day i heard it, though i did find "who you are" is a bit different from anything else on the album, but leads well into "in my tree", which is another breathtakingly atmospheric song (the echo makes it seem like eddie is shouting from up in his tree!). Basically... the last thing id like to say
If you like heavy pearl jam and thats it, i doubt you'll like this. If you like the quiet pearl jam as well you will probably enjoy this, but do expect suprises (there is a harmonica in smile).
Anyway, if your not sure borrow.. then buy if you like.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUBLIMINAL MESSAGES BUT NO CODE, 25 April 2001
By 
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
A FRIEND ONCE TOLD ME "NO DO NOT BUY NO CODE, AS IT IS NOWHERE NEAR AS GOOD AS THE PREVIOUS ALBUMS."(MIND YOU HE ALSO TOLD ME THAT COUNTING CROWS - AUGUST AND EVERYTHING AFTER WAS RUBBISH TOO) FOOLISH BOYS BOTH. HIM FOR NOT LISTENING TO THE ALBUM PROPERLY AND ME FOR LISTENING TO HIM AT ALL. I HAVE WASTED FIVE YEARS OF VALUABLE LISTENING TIME AND I URGE YOU NOT TO MAKE THE SAME MISTAKE. LISTEN TO CLASSICS SUCH AS SMILE AND PRESENT TENSE AND JUDGE FOR YOURSELF. THE SUPERLATIVES ARE NOT EASY TO COME BY FOR THIS ALBUM AS IT IS TRULY UNIQUE AND REQUIRES, NAY , DESERVES TIME TO BE SPENT WITH IT AND FOR YOU TO LOVE IT AS I DO. THE EDDIE VEDDER VOCALS AND LYRICS ONCE AGAIN ARE FLAWLESS, THE BAND OUTSTRIP THEMSELVES WITH INCREDIBLE INTANGIBLE ETHEREAL SOUND. SUFFICE TO SAY THIS IS ONE ALBUM YOUR COLLECTION SHOULD NOT BE WITHOUT.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works best as a whole, 30 Nov 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
It's amazing how much abuse people are willing to hurl at Pearl Jam's fourth album. I don't think it's that bad. In fact, I quite like it. It's not my favourite album or anything, but it's still pretty good. The mistake that most people make, I feel, is that they are - and this is true of every Pearl Jam release - expecting another Ten. And, granted, Ten was brilliant, but they are not comparable albums. No Code is more of an experience than an album. You can't select a single track, and say, "this is blatantly the best track on the album", because they all have their strengths and weaknesses - there are no Blacks and no Jeremies here. No, for the album really to come to life one just has to press play and let it go. It is, however, striking that if you heard one of these songs out of context for the first time you wouldn't at first think that it was PJ - "Mankind", for instance could just be by any band.
Having said that, it's still a good album. It does have stand-out tracks, such as "In My Tree" and "Red Mosquito", but it really works best as a whole.
Just sit back relax and enjoy the melodies.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Code, 8 July 2013
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This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
This is the album the guys brought out during their famous Ticket Master feud. Every Pearl Jam fan should own it because of it's significance of the band standing up to the big guys, but don't expect their usual sound .
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's getting better, 15 Nov 2001
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
No Code, like its predecessor, is wonderfully packaged. Thankfully unlike its predecessor, it is not an embarrassing mess of a record. But what, then, is it exactly? It is worth noting that this (despite Lukin, Habit and Hail, Hail) is said to be Pearl Jam's 'quiet' album, and that it to a large extent is. Perhaps as their own reaction to the grunge rock clichés of Vitalogy, No Code is less ready to rock for the sake of it, and more inclined to sit back and think a little. Sadly, Vedder's lyrical talents had not completely returned (in truth they never would) but this record gives the impression that at least Pearl Jam were trying again. To the critical, it may seem that the fact that this represents Pearl Jam applying themselves and still falling far short of their early nineties standards is a sign of the fact that Pearl Jam were not to become the consistently high quality band they seemed to promise. But forgetting such laments (perhaps realizing them to be true but none the less no impediment to enjoying what is to be found in Pearl Jam's post Vs. work) No Code is a good record. Smile, Off He Goes, Red Mosquito and Present Tense stand as some of Pearl Jam's best work, all be it of a different sort to that to be found on Ten or Vs, and Mankind (sung - or twanged - by Stone Gossard) is a fantastic romp through nineties surf rock, filtered through a pair of sixties earphones and with bouncing firmly in mind. The rockers let the side down by being (now typically) under done and unengaging, and Sometimes, Who You Are and In My Tree are perhaps a little too slight. But the dynamic of the album is good, with the harder edged tracks used well to punch through what could otherwise be slightly dynamically flat sections of the record. It is tempting to sound critical in observing that somehow No Code fails to deliver what for no apparent reason one expects that it should. Perhaps having heard the wonderful Footsteps or Yellow Ledbetter from earlier in the band's career (neither of which would have fitted Ten, but both of which seem perfect for the mood of No Code), one is disappointed that what we actually get is not of such a standard. However, to be overly critical in this respect is to forget the huge advance this record represents from Vitalogy, and the quality of what good material is there. The performances are solid if largely unexceptional...
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars So much more mellow, 5 Oct 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: No Code (Audio CD)
The band has changed drummer and Eddie has got married and beenon holiday while the rest have been on tour with Neil Young as 'Mirror Ball'. Stone Gossard has started his own label and Pearl Jam draft in Jack Irons as their new drummer, he used to be in the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Well this is a very mellow album as if they are still on holiday this is a very mature album, there is not one song here that will make you get up of your butt and want to dance, if fact the complete opposite. You can totally tell they have been idolizing Neil Young just imagine Neil's band with Eddie on vocals. The songs that stand out slightly are 'Habit, Red Mosquito, Hail,Hail, Who You Are'. If they didn't have such a tight band this would not be such a good album.
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No Code by Pearl Jam (Audio CD - 2000)
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