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4.8 out of 5 stars
Delicate Sound Of Thunder
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 12 September 2009
this is the complete experience for lovers of pink floyd. taken from probably their best ever tour, all of the songs are performed studio perfect and are recorded round and crisp in sound which can be cranked up to full volume without distortion. a must for every floyd fan.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 21 August 2013
Having got the live DSOTM, Wall and Pulse albums I thought this would not be a necessary addition to my cd collection but I was wrong! Yes, I have most of the tracks on other live albums but there are some very different arrangements of classics like Money which make the album well wort investing in. Also the live version of One of these days is terrific!

For the price of a few pints you just can't go wrong with this if you are a Floyd fan.
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46 of 52 people found the following review helpful
I believe there is something of a generation gap in terms of Pink Floyd fans' appreciation of this live double album released in 1990. Older fans who experienced all of the band's genius in the 1960s and 1970s may have had a little trouble adjusting to the reconstitution of the band (without Roger Waters) in the 1980s. As for me, I had only recently discovered the band at that time - 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason was actually the first Floyd CD I bought. I had seen The Wall and was somewhat familiar with some of the classic cuts from Dark Side of the Moon, but Delicate Sound of Thunder was essentially my first real introduction to the musical mystique of Pink Floyd. I happen to much prefer Roger Waters' vocals on vintage Floyd tracks, but I am still impressed with David Gilmour's vocals and the energy with which Waters' former band mates resurrected Pink Floyd after the bitter breakup of the band. The fact that I really learned such songs as Comfortably Numb and Time from Gilmour's versions on this live album actually allows me to appreciate Waters' original vocals even more while never looking down on these recordings as inferior versions. Had I been a fan of Pink Floyd since the beginning (and I would have been if I had been born a decade or two earlier), I imagine I would have had trouble adjusting to the Waters-less ensemble showcasing their wares here. I should also add the fact that the later live double album release, Pulse, is of superior quality than this - but Delicate Sound of Thunder still wows me. The only unhappy feelings I have toward this album come from the fact that I didn't get the chance to see them perform in the concert tour from which this music is derived.
The fifteen tracks included on these two CDs represent a mix of the new and the timeless. Five of the ten songs from 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason are included: Learning to Fly, The Dogs of War, On the Turning Away, Yet Another Movie, and Sorrow. I happen to think AMLR was a great album, and the live performances of these songs really do them justice; On the Turning Away is a particularly incredible live track.
Of course, one's attention is always fixed most closely on the timeless Pink Floyd songs. Dark Side of the Moon is represented here by three songs: Time, Money, and Us and Them (of course, the second CD in 1995's Pulse contains a live performance of the entire Dark Side of the Moon album). The backup singers do get to be a little annoying on the drawn-out version of Money. Wish You Were Here supplies its own title track, an always-welcome addition to the fun, as well as this album's opening number Shine on You Crazy Diamond. One of These Days stands out as the only purely instrumental track on the double album. I am not a big fan of extended instrumental pieces, but Pink Floyd prove to be the exception to the rule - largely due to Gilmour's devastatingly impressive guitar work. Shine on You Crazy Diamond always reminds me a little bit of the old Doctor Who theme song, and that bit of nostalgia only makes me enjoy the music even more. This second disc closes with three songs from The Wall: the ever-popular Another Brick in the Wall Part II, Comfortably Numb (featuring a particularly scintillating guitar solo by Gilmour), and Run Like Hell.
Delicate Sound of Thunder has, in some ways, been superseded by 1995's Pulse double live album. It's a superior effort all around, but a number of the timeless tracks found here on Delicate Sound of Thunder cannot be found there. I can understand why some Floyd fanatics aren't overly impressed with this 1988 release, but a newly-reconstituted Pink Floyd (sans Waters) at slightly less than their best is still way, way better than almost everything else out there. The fact that Gilmour and the guys could deliver such quality performances of songs so intimately associated with Roger Waters proves just how timeless the music of Pink Floyd is.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 25 May 2014
Forget the remastered versions. I like the creativity of PF so if you like raw live concert energy buy this .
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This in-concert material from Pink Floyd's 1988 tour to promote `A Momentary Lapse of Reason' was released in November of that year, surprisingly the band's first `official' (non-bootleg) live-in-concert material available to fans since `Ummagumma' in 1969.

These concerts were, of course, without Roger Waters who had acrimoniously split from the band following `The Final Cut' and initiated legal proceedings to prevent the three remaining members using the Pink Floyd name. Having gained a royalty agreement and all rights to `The Wall', Waters settled the action and went his own way.

TDSoT is a good album, but IMO eclipsed by `The Pulse' released in 1995 from the `Division Bell' tour where the resurrected Waters-free band's mojo was working in overdrive. As you might expect, TDSoT majors on material from the new AMLoR album, with six tracks featured. The remaining material is classic Floyd: Crazy Diamond & WYWH, a storming rendition of `One of these Days' from Meddle, three tracks from DSotM (but not the work performed in its entirety as on `The Pulse'), and all three of Gilmour's modest contributions to The Wall: `Another Brick', `Comfortably Numb' and `Run Like Hell'.

BTW there's a film of the concert footage which includes more songs than the CD, notably an epic version of `The Great Gig in the Sky' which is worth seeking out if you've never seen it.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
I think this is an excellent recording, showcasing a fine selection from Pink Floyd's repertoire. The sound quality is fine...maybe too fine actually as most songs sound like note-perfect, error free replicas of the studio versions...hence the four star rating...
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
I know I'm in the minority here, but I like this album better than Pulse. The songs sit really well with each other, and I think the selection of songs they included is spot-on. Classics like Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Time and Comfortably Numb goes very well with the new stuff like Learning To Fly, Sorrow and particularly the superb On The Turning Away. The latter has to be my favorite, in the inclusion of that track alone does make this album stand out to Pulse for me (even if High Hopes from the latter is another favorite of mine). Btw. I have to mention that the upcoming Pulse DVD (scheduled for release this september or october) should include On The Turning Away, and I simply can't wait for it's release.

Anyway, back to Delicate Sounds Of Thunder ... Where was I? Well, the playing is immaculate. Even for someone who's not overly of a guitar enthusiast like me, Gilmores playing on Comfortably Numb is sufficiant to make me extatic. That anybody can claim his vocal to be lacking is beyond my comprehension. What he does on Shine On You Crazy Diamon, Comfortably Numb (again), Wish You Were Here, Us and Them and - of course - On The Turning Away is so wonderful it can move me to tears. And the brilliant backing singers disserve their due of credit as well, again tracks like Shine On You Crazy Diamond and Comfortably Numb are brilliant examples.

I can only recommend this recording. In fact, before I heard this, the only Floyd song I was familiar with is the terribly dull Another Brick In The Wall (part II) - which of course also is in this set. I listened to this recording twice, and I was a fan. A brilliant testimony to the legacy of a superb band - that had by no means faded in the late 80's, even after the departure of a core member. Essential.

OVERALL RATING: 10 / 10
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2014
If you like floyd what more can i say? It arrived early, and have been listening to it at least three times a week since then. Being a silver surfer, to me, this is a golden oldie
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on 19 April 2015
A great collection of Floyds best, pure brilliance from this super group. Hard to accept the age of some of these tracks, a truly brilliant period in British music. These are timeless tracks that will live on for ever. Pink Floyd are still the best and this album reaffirms this.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 3 March 2003
this is a brilliant album,it was the first live album by the neo pink floyd.the first half of the album is the best and consists mainly of material from momentary lapse of reason.the next side of the album is good but most of the songs are not as good as there oringinals,this album holds the third best comfortably numb(out of six)the first being pulse and the second being ITABOT?.the only major criticm I have of this album is the wall part 2 even though it is spectalarly done like in every other version, the intamacy is lost beacause it does not follow on from happiest days of our lives just like in pulse.
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