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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't always trust the critics
This album has I feel has been needlessly given a bad press over the years. Indeed, it is reputed that Miles and indeed Gil Evans did not want this album released!
However, I think Miles and others maybe have been too harsh in their judgement of this album. It isn't that bad at all. Recorded on the West Coast it indeed has that West Coast laid back feel to the album...
Published on 24 Mar 2009 by Bc V. Price

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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Miles plays the Bossanova
This was truly an interesting session but unfortunately it also marked the end of a collaboration of two musicians that marked the history of music permanently. So let 's be blunt, this session does not stand up to neither : "Porgy and Bess", "Miles Ahead" or "Scetches of Spain", but still the music contained in it is beautiful yet very incomplete. In 1962 the Bossanova...
Published on 31 Mar 2001 by GEORGIOS G.


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't always trust the critics, 24 Mar 2009
This review is from: Quiet Nights (Audio CD)
This album has I feel has been needlessly given a bad press over the years. Indeed, it is reputed that Miles and indeed Gil Evans did not want this album released!
However, I think Miles and others maybe have been too harsh in their judgement of this album. It isn't that bad at all. Recorded on the West Coast it indeed has that West Coast laid back feel to the album. Anyway, I like this album and I would recommend it. It has for me a great moods of melancholy, menace and joy within it. It IS in the mould of Sketches of Spain in particular and also maybe Porgy and Bess for sound and arrangements.
The highlight tracks for me are 'once upon a Summertime' and the 'Night of the Barracudas' which is intersting episodic piece, in that it was written for astage play which was to star Laurence Harvey and is very moody. Miles plays both his famous Harmon Mute and some lovely Open trumpet on this album.
It is a very accesible album and user friendly. Trust your instincts,forget the 'critics' if you like mellow jazz this album will serve you well.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Miles plays the Bossanova, 31 Mar 2001
By 
GEORGIOS G. (Athens, Attiki Greece) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Quiet Nights (Audio CD)
This was truly an interesting session but unfortunately it also marked the end of a collaboration of two musicians that marked the history of music permanently. So let 's be blunt, this session does not stand up to neither : "Porgy and Bess", "Miles Ahead" or "Scetches of Spain", but still the music contained in it is beautiful yet very incomplete. In 1962 the Bossanova scene was truly VERY hot and Miles Davis having dispanded his first great quintet and after the success of "Scetches of Spain" gave in to Columbia's persistent efforts to get him to record a bossanova record with Gil Evans.
The idea was not necessarily bad just because it was a bit biased, but Columbia's urge to make as much money as possible from this trend and to make it fast, led them to cut the record and push it to the market, without allowing the two musicians to actually finish the record. While they were having a month's break from their first date in the studio when they begun the record, without consulting neither of the two, Columbia cut the record on April of 1963. The result was that the record got very bad reviews (much worse than it actually deserved) and led to the two artists exchanging some bad words and breaking up their musical cooperation for quite a while. And even when they got together again they did not record an entire album but only individual tracks.
To cut a long story short what we have here is some very sweet tunes and some obviously incomplete or average takes of songs lasting a total of 22 minutes. The very interesting 13 minute bonus track composition of "times of the Barracudas" conducted by Evans and performed by the second great Miles Davis quintet with George Coleman on sax (instead of Wayne Shorter that was still in Art Blakey's Messengers at the time) was performed for a theatrical play on May of 1963 and has absolutely nothing to do with the bossanova. It concludes an uneven CD with some very beautiful moments, but nothing close to the standards Evans and Davis set before. Maybe it is worth 4 stars but the bar was already set very high...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars For Miles completists only, 28 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Quiet Nights (Audio CD)
I have to admit - and I realise that to many this is sacrilege - that I've never really understood why Miles Davis & Gil Evans' collaborations have the reputation they do. There are some good bits on Miles Ahead and Porgy & Bess, but for the most part I find them all rather bland. Compared to, for example, the 1960s Jazz suites of Duke Ellington, Evans' arrangements seem like an an uneasy synthesis of Big-Band-Jazz and classical music that's doesn't particularly play to the strengths of either genre.

With this in mind it's perhaps inevitable that I've little good to say about Quiet Nights, Davis & Evans' fourth and final collaborative album, generally regarded - when it's even remembered at all - as one of the low points of the Davis canon. Neither Davis nor Evans had intended Quiet Nights to be released (at least, in this form) and it seems to make little sense as an album The 'suite' itself - if it can be called that - is just a sequence of bland, anonymous, vaguely latin-flavoured tracks that finish before they go anywhere, barely amounting to 20 minutes of music (perhaps Evans had intended to write some faster, longer pieces to fit between them?).

The two bonus tracks are generally better than the album itself, although not so much as to redeem it. 'Summer Night' is an out-take from the session that produced Miles' album 'Seven Steps to Heaven' and has nothing to do with Gil Evans nor with this album's bossa-nova concept. It's a reasonable track but it doesn't really belong here and is actually present on CDs of Seven Steps to Heaven (it's on mine, anyway), which is obviously its proper context. The second bonus track, "The Time of the Barracudas", was another Evans-Davis collaboration that's actually better than Quiet Nights, although here again the sections end before they really get going (although it's programmed as a single 13-minute track, 'Barracudas' is actually a suite of 5-6 separate pieces).

So there's nothing really worth having here, from most peoples' perspective. Buy it if you want to complete a Miles Davis collection, or if you absolutely loved the 3 famous Evans-Davis collaborations and want to hear more, although be prepared to be disappointed if you're expecting the same quality here. One suspects that Miles' heart simply wasn't in this.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quiet Nights gets a muted reception but is saved by the Barracudas, 10 Jan 2012
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The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Quiet Nights (Audio CD)
The common view about `Quiet Nights' among Miles fans is that his peerless legacy might have been even better had it not been released.

It's hard to dissent from this view, except to say the result is in no way `bad' music, though admittedly not amongst Davis's best. This final major-project collaboration between Miles and Gil Evans was an attempt to make a Bossa Nova-themed album - very trendy in 1962 - to capture the feel of Brazil the way `Sketches of Spain' captured the musical heart of the Iberian Peninsula to perfection. QN certainly doesn't stand shoulder to shoulder with `Miles Ahead', `Porgy & Bess' or `Sketches of Spain' but it does have its moments, especially the opener `Song Number 2'.

The original release had an `unfinished' feel because it WAS unfinished: the studio rushed it into the market to catch the popular bossa-nova fad in the US in 1963 before Miles and Gil could really round it off; and was only around 30 minutes long. Miles is on record as being dissatisfied with the whole process, and the result. However, on this release we get two bonus tracks, neither of which have much to do with bossa nova but which nevertheless make the album more worthwhile. The first is `Summer Night', a Dubin composition left over from the `Seven Steps to Heaven' sessions (one of Miles' underrated gems) featuring Ron Carter, Frank Butler and Victor Feldman - a cool and mellow number befitting the title. The second is by common consent the best track here and the saving grace of this collection: `The Time of the Barracudas', a 13-minute suite with several sections originally put together as the soundtrack for a play, a quintessential Davis-Evans collaborative effort with fine orchestrations and beautiful melodic playing.

Of course, if you're a Miles fan you have to have it in the collection. Though (maybe like `Tutu' and `Doo-Bop' and a few other less-than-satisfactory releases) this is not amongst Miles' most enduring works, it's still music by Miles Davis and it definitely has its moments.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and incomplete, 10 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Quiet Nights (Audio CD)
One of the few stutters in a glittering career, Miles was persuaded to make an album in the then popular Bossa Nova style with frequent collaborator Gil Evans. Whatever happened, the sessions didn't work and the project was quietly abandoned with just 20 minutes of music committed to tape - or so they thought. With a significant investment of recording costs Columbia asked producer Teo Macero to piece together an album - a short one. With the addition of Summer Night from a completely different session an album was released - after the sublime Seven steps To Heaven recorded immediately after Quiet Nights. Miles was furious and refused to talk to Teo for several years, immediately disowning the album. That said it's hard to fault any of Miles' work from the acoustic period and this does have some redeeming features, it just isn't up to his usual impeccable standards. One for collectors only.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just get it - no questions to ask!, 24 Jun 2010
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This review is from: Quiet Nights (Audio CD)
`Talent does whatever it wants to - GENIUS does only what it can' - so said the nineteenth century painter Eugene Delacroix. In 1962 Columbia records released the Miles Davis album `Quiet Nights' - an album that would change how we see music forever. On the album is the definitive version of `Once upon a summertime' (La Valse des lilas) written by Michel Legrand in 1954 - when he was just 22! Legrand's score requires subtlety, clarity and emotion - and Miles Davis delivers! And how! Outstanding!
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